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Priscilla R Owen

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NATIONAL
May 19, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Surely it was no accident that Republicans on Wednesday sent forth Priscilla R. Owen, a soft-spoken Texas Supreme Court justice, to open the Senate's political brawl over President Bush's judicial nominees. The 50-year-old jurist, who also teaches Sunday school, comes across as a mainstream conservative. She is not known for making provocative speeches -- unlike California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown, another Bush nominee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 26, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Senate finally closed the chapter on the filibuster saga of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen on Wednesday, formally confirming her nomination to a federal appellate court. The mostly party-line vote was 55-43. Democratic opposition to Owen and several of President Bush's other nominees to the federal bench had pushed the Senate to the brink of a showdown over the use of the filibuster against judicial nominees.
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NATIONAL
May 26, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Senate finally closed the chapter on the filibuster saga of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen on Wednesday, formally confirming her nomination to a federal appellate court. The mostly party-line vote was 55-43. Democratic opposition to Owen and several of President Bush's other nominees to the federal bench had pushed the Senate to the brink of a showdown over the use of the filibuster against judicial nominees.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Republicans filed a motion Friday to end debate on the nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the federal bench, a move starting the countdown to the so-called nuclear option. The motion schedules for Tuesday the long-anticipated showdown over whether Democrats have the right to use the parliamentary tactic known as the filibuster to block presidential judicial nominations. Before filing the motion, Sen.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate scandals made their way into a Senate battle over a Texas judge Tuesday, as Democrats called President Bush's nominee to the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, Priscilla R. Owen, a faithful ally of big business and a foe of injured consumers. Owen, 47, is an elected justice of the Texas Supreme Court whose first campaign was run by Karl Rove, now senior advisor to Bush. A Houstonian, she received $8,600 in campaign contributions from Enron. And she is a friend of Bush's.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Republicans filed a motion Friday to end debate on the nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the federal bench, a move starting the countdown to the so-called nuclear option. The motion schedules for Tuesday the long-anticipated showdown over whether Democrats have the right to use the parliamentary tactic known as the filibuster to block presidential judicial nominations. Before filing the motion, Sen.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Moderate Democrats and Republicans failed Tuesday to derail a confrontation over federal judgeships that both sides said would begin playing out today on the floor of the Senate. Republican leaders said they would start the day's Senate session by opening debate on President Bush's nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the federal appeals court in New Orleans.
OPINION
May 30, 2005
Re "Senate Confirms Nomination of Filibuster Target," May 26: Judge Priscilla R. Owen has now been confirmed to fill a seat on the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which has been vacant since January 1997. To fill that vacancy, President Clinton first nominated Jorge Rangel of Corpus Christi, Texas, whose nomination was returned to the president in 1998 after 15 months without even a hearing in the Judiciary Committee. In September 1999, Clinton nominated Enrique Moreno to that seat, and that nomination was stalled, without a hearing, for 17 months.
OPINION
May 18, 2005
We usually like it when centrist senators like John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) try to galvanize the sensible center on behalf of some compromise, but we sincerely hope they fail in their attempt to preserve the Senate's filibuster. Count this page on the side of conservative social activists who are pushing Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist to "nuke" the filibuster. We don't share these activists' enthusiasm for the White House judicial nominees triggering the current showdown.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Surely it was no accident that Republicans on Wednesday sent forth Priscilla R. Owen, a soft-spoken Texas Supreme Court justice, to open the Senate's political brawl over President Bush's judicial nominees. The 50-year-old jurist, who also teaches Sunday school, comes across as a mainstream conservative. She is not known for making provocative speeches -- unlike California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown, another Bush nominee.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Moderate Democrats and Republicans failed Tuesday to derail a confrontation over federal judgeships that both sides said would begin playing out today on the floor of the Senate. Republican leaders said they would start the day's Senate session by opening debate on President Bush's nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the federal appeals court in New Orleans.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate scandals made their way into a Senate battle over a Texas judge Tuesday, as Democrats called President Bush's nominee to the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, Priscilla R. Owen, a faithful ally of big business and a foe of injured consumers. Owen, 47, is an elected justice of the Texas Supreme Court whose first campaign was run by Karl Rove, now senior advisor to Bush. A Houstonian, she received $8,600 in campaign contributions from Enron. And she is a friend of Bush's.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2003 | From Reuters
A divided U.S. Senate committee gave preliminary approval Thursday to President Bush's nomination of Priscilla R. Owen, a conservative Texas Supreme Court justice, to the federal appellate bench. But Owen may face a Democratic procedural roadblock in the full Senate, like the one preventing confirmation of fellow judicial nominee Miguel Estrada. On a party-line vote of 10-9, the Judiciary Committee sent to the Senate Bush's nomination of Owen to the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.
OPINION
May 22, 2005 | Judy Dugan
This is the first of an occasional series in which members of the editorial board voice their disagreement with the official position of the newspaper. Although the board is responsible for every unsigned opinion that appears in this space, not every member agrees with every editorial. * The argument that the Senate filibuster is anti-democratic is both logical and appealing.
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