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Prison

OPINION
November 13, 2011
Californians shouldn't be surprised by recent reports, such as The Times' front-page story Friday, that county jails are filling up. Public safety realignment is no secret. After years of refusal to consider sentencing reforms, inability to provide adequate drug treatment, unwillingness to prepare parolees for lives outside prison and a continuing insistence on locking up more people longer, state prisons became so overcrowded that the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the population reduced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Six state correctional officers were recovering from injuries after they were attacked by an inmate Thursday at the California Men's Colony in San Luis Obispo. At least one of the officers was seriously injured by the inmate, who used his fists and a plastic cup to batter the officers, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. State authorities identified the inmate as Christopher McCoy, 34, who is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole for a first-degree murder conviction.
OPINION
October 5, 2009 | Bernard E. Harcourt, Bernard E. Harcourt, a professor of law and of political science at the University of Chicago, is the author of "Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy."
This term, the U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral arguments in two cases, Sullivan vs. Florida and Graham vs. Florida, that will decide whether it's cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 13-year-old or a 17-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The court should follow its prior reasoning in Roper vs. Simmons, a 2005 ruling that held the juvenile death penalty unconstitutional, and similarly draw a bright line at 18 years of age for imposing life sentences without parole.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- An Egyptian court Sunday sentenced three prominent activists to three-year prison terms and heavy fines, state media reported, in what was seen by rights advocates as a worrying sign of the military-backed government's determination to suppress political dissent. The three -- Ahmed Maher, Mohamed Adel and Ahmed Douma -- are best known for leading roles in the 2011 uprising that toppled autocratic President Hosni Mubarak as protests blazed across the Arab world. The unexpectedly harsh sentences provoked dismay among rights advocates, who have been feeling increasingly under siege at the hands of the interim government, despite its promises to return the country to democracy.
SPORTS
August 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- An Oceanside couple were sentenced Monday to lengthy prison terms for brutally keeping an under-age relative as a sex slave, housekeeper, baby sitter and prostitute. Inez Martinez Garcia, 44, was sentenced to 20 years in prison, and her husband, Marcial Garcia Hernandez, 45, to 23 years to life. Each had pleaded guilty to multiple counts of abuse. The two were accused of forcing the girl to clean and cook, take care of the couple's three children and have sex with Hernandez and with other men for money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1987
Your editorial states that "Everyone agrees that a prison belongs in Los Angeles County, which furnishes 38% of the state's male inmates but has no state facility within its border." Why does the number of prisoners that a county "furnishes" have anything to do with placing a prison in that county? Extend this kind of logic slightly and someone will decide that not only should there be a prison in Los Angeles County, but 38% of the state's male prisoners should be imprisoned in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1999
Gary Bornman's desperate plea for help before he is released from Lompoc prison (Voices, Feb. 13) is echoed by thousands of inmates across the country who are not prepared to integrate into society when they are released. As a television writer/producer, I have interviewed many prisoners who have no idea how differently a free society operates from the isolated one behind bars. Life in prison has its own rules and codes of behavior. A simple gesture, such as an innocent glance, in the outside world could be a threatening challenge in prison.
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