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Prison

OPINION
November 13, 2011
Californians shouldn't be surprised by recent reports, such as The Times' front-page story Friday, that county jails are filling up. Public safety realignment is no secret. After years of refusal to consider sentencing reforms, inability to provide adequate drug treatment, unwillingness to prepare parolees for lives outside prison and a continuing insistence on locking up more people longer, state prisons became so overcrowded that the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the population reduced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Paige St. John
Federal experts on Tuesday gave a potentially passing grade to the inmate medical care provided at a California prison in Tuolumne County, the third state prison to get such a review, despite lapses in care and the suspected carbon monoxide poisoning death of an inmate firefighter. The latest evaluation concludes the Sierra Conservation Center will be providing adequate medical care once planned building improvements are made. The prison was inspected by experts working for the U.S. District Court, which is monitoring inmate care statewide.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- An Egyptian court Sunday sentenced three prominent activists to three-year prison terms and heavy fines, state media reported, in what was seen by rights advocates as a worrying sign of the military-backed government's determination to suppress political dissent. The three -- Ahmed Maher, Mohamed Adel and Ahmed Douma -- are best known for leading roles in the 2011 uprising that toppled autocratic President Hosni Mubarak as protests blazed across the Arab world. The unexpectedly harsh sentences provoked dismay among rights advocates, who have been feeling increasingly under siege at the hands of the interim government, despite its promises to return the country to democracy.
SPORTS
August 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- A software engineer and his real estate agent wife who terrorized their tenants in a twisted attempt to force them to move are back after fleeing to Italy, and each has accepted a four-year prison sentence and two strikes rather than face trial, Dist. Atty. George Gascon announced Wednesday. Nicknamed the "landlords from hell," Kip and Nicole Macy employed tactics "so outlandish and brazen" in attempting to clear their building of renters that "it sounds like the plot of a horror movie," Gascon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- An Oceanside couple were sentenced Monday to lengthy prison terms for brutally keeping an under-age relative as a sex slave, housekeeper, baby sitter and prostitute. Inez Martinez Garcia, 44, was sentenced to 20 years in prison, and her husband, Marcial Garcia Hernandez, 45, to 23 years to life. Each had pleaded guilty to multiple counts of abuse. The two were accused of forcing the girl to clean and cook, take care of the couple's three children and have sex with Hernandez and with other men for money.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has spent his first night in prison, confined to an underground cell in a maximum-security facility with fellow accused drug traffickers with names like El Hummer, officials said Sunday. The capture on Saturday of one of the world's leading drug traffickers and Mexico's most-wanted billionaire fugitive ended a manhunt of more than a decade. Reporters at the Altiplano prison in the state of Mexico, outside Mexico City, said Guzman did not apparently receive family or lawyers as visitors, although officials were present to begin reading to him some of the many charges against him. The United States has offered a $5-million bounty on him and may seek his extradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2006 | From the Associated Press
After 38 years, Michael Robert Smith figured no one was still looking for him. He escaped from the Correctional Training Facility in Soledad, Calif., on June 7, 1968, after serving three years of a five-years-to-life sentence for robbery. He headed first to Nevada, then New Jersey and into a marriage that didn't work out, and finally five years ago to a tiny travel trailer in a heavily wooded area of Creek County, Okla.
OPINION
October 5, 2009 | Bernard E. Harcourt, Bernard E. Harcourt, a professor of law and of political science at the University of Chicago, is the author of "Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy."
This term, the U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral arguments in two cases, Sullivan vs. Florida and Graham vs. Florida, that will decide whether it's cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 13-year-old or a 17-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The court should follow its prior reasoning in Roper vs. Simmons, a 2005 ruling that held the juvenile death penalty unconstitutional, and similarly draw a bright line at 18 years of age for imposing life sentences without parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- One day after Gov. Jerry Brown unveiled a prison spending plan opposed by Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), the Senate canceled a confirmation hearing for two Corrections Department directors appointed by the governor. Brown named Daniel Stone to head the division of parole and Jayde Virbel as the associate director of adult institutions in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Both appointees need to be confirmed by the Senate, and seemed to be on their way with a hearing in the Rules Committee set for Wednesday afternoon.
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