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March 27, 2013 | By Paige St. John
Federal experts on Tuesday gave a potentially passing grade to the inmate medical care provided at a California prison in Tuolumne County, the third state prison to get such a review, despite lapses in care and the suspected carbon monoxide poisoning death of an inmate firefighter. The latest evaluation concludes the Sierra Conservation Center will be providing adequate medical care once planned building improvements are made. The prison was inspected by experts working for the U.S. District Court, which is monitoring inmate care statewide.
June 19, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- A software engineer and his real estate agent wife who terrorized their tenants in a twisted attempt to force them to move are back after fleeing to Italy, and each has accepted a four-year prison sentence and two strikes rather than face trial, Dist. Atty. George Gascon announced Wednesday. Nicknamed the "landlords from hell," Kip and Nicole Macy employed tactics "so outlandish and brazen" in attempting to clear their building of renters that "it sounds like the plot of a horror movie," Gascon said.
April 16, 2011
On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that focuses on a narrow issue: whether a judge had the right to increase a convicted defendant's sentence so she could participate in a rehabilitation program in prison. But the case of Alejandra Tapia also raises the much broader question of whether Congress should reconsider the nature and purpose of incarceration. After being convicted of smuggling illegal immigrants across the U.S.-Mexico border, Tapia came before a federal judge who sentenced her to a period in prison long enough for her to enter a drug rehabilitation program with a long waiting list.
January 16, 1987
Your editorial states that "Everyone agrees that a prison belongs in Los Angeles County, which furnishes 38% of the state's male inmates but has no state facility within its border." Why does the number of prisoners that a county "furnishes" have anything to do with placing a prison in that county? Extend this kind of logic slightly and someone will decide that not only should there be a prison in Los Angeles County, but 38% of the state's male prisoners should be imprisoned in Los Angeles County.
February 22, 1999
Gary Bornman's desperate plea for help before he is released from Lompoc prison (Voices, Feb. 13) is echoed by thousands of inmates across the country who are not prepared to integrate into society when they are released. As a television writer/producer, I have interviewed many prisoners who have no idea how differently a free society operates from the isolated one behind bars. Life in prison has its own rules and codes of behavior. A simple gesture, such as an innocent glance, in the outside world could be a threatening challenge in prison.
March 8, 2013 | By Paige St. John
A Stockton lawmaker troubled by recent violent crimes in her town committed by parole violators released early from county jail wants to let judges send those offenders back to prison. The proposal would require a partial rollback of Gov. Jerry Brown's prison realignment plan, designed to lower state prison populations following federal court orders to ease overcrowding. The 2011 measure makes counties responsible for incarcerating low-level felons who once went to prison, and for supervising most state inmates when they are released from prison.
March 2, 1994
Before we start building prisons (at a cost of some $100,000 per cell) to launch a new offensive in the "war on crime," let's consider the effectiveness of prisons. In fact, let's examine the whole concept of "crime and punishment." Why do we put people in prison when they violate the law? It seems to me that there are four main reasons: 1) "That'll teach 'em a lesson." The presumption here is that by putting a criminal in prison for a portion of his life, large or small, we give him an opportunity to reflect upon his behavior so that when he comes out, he'll be a decent, law-abiding citizen.
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