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Prisoner Exchanges

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WORLD
February 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombian President Alvaro Uribe ruled out exchanging prisoners with his country's largest rebel group, which holds dozens of hostages. Those held by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, are "good citizens" who cannot be exchanged for jailed guerrillas, Uribe said during a visit to the European Union office in Brussels. "The Colombian government cannot enter into negotiations that strengthen terrorism," Uribe said at a news conference. The hostages include three U.S.
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WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - Diplomats on Monday pushed for a limited cease-fire in Syria, a prisoner exchange and better access for aid efforts before a peace conference scheduled to begin next week in Switzerland. At a news conference in Paris, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said that he and his Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, had discussed measures to "set the stage for success. " One potential area for a cessation of hostilities, Kerry said, was the embattled northern city of Aleppo, divided for 18 months between government and opposition forces and also the site of recent rebel infighting.
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NEWS
September 6, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A complex exchange of prisoners, involving a South African army commando, a young French Communist and a Dutch historian--the latter two allegedly having worked for the African National Congress--and 133 captured Angolan soldiers was agreed upon Saturday, the governments involved announced. Angola, France, the Netherlands and South Africa all welcomed the exchange, which is scheduled to take place Monday in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Syrian opposition fighters Wednesday released 48 Iranians captured in August in exchange for the freeing of at least 2,130 detainees held by President Bashar Assad's government, in the largest prisoner swap of the country's civil war, officials said. Meanwhile, Lakhdar Brahimi, the special envoy to Syria for the United Nations and Arab League, denounced the peace plan Assad unveiled this week as sectarian and one-sided, offering little hope that a diplomatic solution to the country's violence will be found any time soon.
WORLD
May 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani authorities and Taliban militants exchanged dozens of prisoners, officials said. Pakistan army Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said tribal elders mediating in the talks secured the release of seven security personnel. In return, authorities released 30 people detained in the Waziristan region near the Afghan border. Abbas described the 30 as "tribal people," but three Pakistani intelligence officials said they were suspected militants.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | Reuters
Iran and Iraq both appealed Saturday to the Red Cross to speed the exchange of Persian Gulf War prisoners that started Friday after Baghdad suddenly gave in to Tehran's conditions for peace. The International Committee of the Red Cross insists on conducting a private interview with every prisoner to check that he wants to return home and says it can only handle 1,000 prisoners a day from each side. The prisoners were captured during the 1980-88 Gulf War.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Vietnam has a few good roads: Highway One, for instance, in stretches, but not the section here at the border. The last two miles of it are an asphalt footpath, through a mine field, to Friendship Gate. The area is scarred by war and bristling with military force, a diorama of the fitful relations between the two one-time allies. During the Vietnam War, Chinese and Soviet arms and other supplies moved down Highway One and a parallel railway into North Vietnam. U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Christmas Eve, Bosnia moved raggedly toward peace as two of the warring factions exchanged 245 prisoners Sunday, but a second release of captives here was abruptly canceled. In what officials said was one of the largest prisoner exchanges in the Balkan war, Bosnian Muslims freed 131 captives and Bosnian Serbs released 114 prisoners at a bridge near the town of Gracanica in northern Bosnia-Herzegovina. Those freed included civilians and soldiers, some imprisoned for as long as two years.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian army triumphantly announced over the weekend that it had freed captured paratrooper Nikolai Zavarzin in a special forces operation carried out behind enemy lines in Chechnya. Zavarzin appeared on state television Saturday evening, a few hours after the reported rescue, reassured his parents that he was fine and said he wanted "to thank the people who helped me get out of there."
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first day of freedom after months inside a Serbian prison, Raif Hodzic wept Saturday as he remembered the terrifying torture that he was sure would end his life. Despite the treatment he received, the 64-year-old retired railway worker spoke with an optimism baffling to an outside world that is watching as Bosnia's latest truce crumbles.
WORLD
October 18, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The day was a jarring reminder that for those whose lives have been torn apart by the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, elation on one side often equates with anguish on the other. "It's a day of victory and pride to have my son back in my lap!" cried Umm Khalid, who embraced her son Fouad Abu Amrin, 39, for the first time in 15 years as he stepped off a prison bus at the Rafah crossing in the Gaza Strip. Older and grayer than the 20-year-old who was sentenced to life in prison for murder, Abu Amrin was one of 477 Palestinian convicts released Tuesday in the first step of a 1,027-for-1 exchange for kidnapped Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit.
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
President Obama joined British Prime Minister David Cameron on Tuesday in condemning last year's release of the only person convicted in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, but both men stopped short of pledging a full inquiry into how the release unfolded and whether embattled BP executives had anything to do with it. Speaking to reporters after a morning of meetings at the White House, Cameron said that, despite reports...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2009 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post.
Milan C. "Mike" Miskovsky, a onetime CIA lawyer who quietly worked behind the scenes in high-profile prisoner negotiations and also investigated the causes of racial turmoil in the 1960s, died Oct. 15 of lung cancer at his home in Washington. He was 83. Miskovsky's varied career began when he was a forester in the western United States and took him to flash points of the Cold War and civil rights movement. He negotiated a prisoner exchange that freed U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers and helped arrange the release of Cuban Americans captured during the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion.
WORLD
July 17, 2008 | Raed Rafei, Special to The Times
Hezbollah leader Sheik Hassan Nasrallah on Wednesday warmly welcomed the five Lebanese men who were released from Israeli custody in exchange for the bodies of two Israeli soldiers. Nasrallah embraced Samir Kuntar, the most notorious Lebanese convict held by Israel, who was returning to Lebanon after 29 years in jail. He then hugged the four other fighters released with Kuntar in a swap approved by Israel's Cabinet on Tuesday.
WORLD
July 16, 2008 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Closing an uneasy chapter of its 2006 war against Lebanon's Hezbollah guerrillas, Israel prepared to swap the most notorious Lebanese convict in its prisons today for the remains of two Israeli soldiers whose capture sparked the fighting. The deal, approved by Israel's Cabinet on Tuesday, revived raw emotions on both sides of the 34-day conflict: Israel's frustration over its failure to crush an Arab foe and Hezbollah's euphoria in holding off a powerful army until a U.N.-brokered truce.
WORLD
July 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Israel's military said it had begun digging up the bodies of Lebanese fighters after the government struck a deal with the Hezbollah guerrilla movement to swap five prisoners and dozens of bodies for two Israeli soldiers captured in 2006 who Israel believes are probably dead. Israel will hand over Samir Kuntar, serving multiple life terms for a 1979 attack in Israel's north, four other prisoners and dozens of bodies. In return, Israel is to receive the two soldiers, or their bodies.
NEWS
December 18, 1988
A Soviet delegation opened a new round of talks on prisoner exchanges with Afghan guerrillas in Islamabad, Pakistan. The talks centered on the return of four Soviet soldiers held by the Muslim guerrillas in Afghanistan's northern Baghlan province, a rebel delegate said. Radio Kabul, meanwhile, reported that "criminal extremists"--an apparent reference to the rebels--blasted a northeastern provincial capital with 1,500 rockets over the last three days.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Iraq and Iran agreed today to an immediate exchange of sick and wounded prisoners of war, the first tangible progress in their peace talks since a cease-fire took effect in August. Both sides said it was up to the International Committee of the Red Cross to arrange the swap, which will involve no more than a few thousand prisoners, as soon as possible. Iraq said in a statement in Geneva that it is accepting an Iranian proposal to exchange the prisoners on humanitarian grounds.
WORLD
May 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani authorities and Taliban militants exchanged dozens of prisoners, officials said. Pakistan army Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said tribal elders mediating in the talks secured the release of seven security personnel. In return, authorities released 30 people detained in the Waziristan region near the Afghan border. Abbas described the 30 as "tribal people," but three Pakistani intelligence officials said they were suspected militants.
WORLD
October 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A German engineer and four Afghans taken hostage in central Afghanistan in July have been freed in exchange for five imprisoned criminals, an Afghan official said. Local elders handed over Rudolf Blechschmidt and the four Afghans to officials from Afghanistan's intelligence service in Wardak province, said Mohammad Nahim, a district chief.
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