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Prisoner Rehabilitation

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OPINION
July 2, 2004
The prison reforms that an expert panel presented Thursday to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger are as dramatic as the prisons' failings. For decades, California's prison guards and their union have accumulated power, so that today they run the system. Prisoner rehabilitation is a shambles. California's recidivism rate, says the review panel's report, is the nation's worst. Schwarzenegger had asked the panel, led by former Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
David Lewis, an ex-convict turned social activist who co-founded a drug treatment and prisoner rehabilitation program that gained national recognition, died June 9 of a bullet wound to the abdomen, said his mother, Cora. He was 54. Lewis was shot outside a mall in San Mateo, Calif., in what police are calling a targeted attack. With a Stanford University student in 1992, Lewis started Free at Last in East Palo Alto, Calif. The organization helps more than 4,200 people annually and has become a model of community-based treatment, said Lara Galinksy of Echoing Green, a nonprofit that provided seed money to Free at Last.
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NEWS
November 11, 2001 | RUSS BYNUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kelly Burke proudly points to the list on his Web site containing the names of 62 criminals convicted of crimes from shoplifting to stalking, drunken driving to drug dealing. Some have served time. Many haven't. Burke, district attorney for Houston County near Macon, puts them all under one heading: "BANNED." These are the bad guys he's uprooted and banished from the county. "I do it all the time. I love it," Burke said. "We banish people frequently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld and Patrick McGreevy
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday sent lawmakers his plan to trim more than $5 billion in spending by dismantling or drastically curtailing state programs that provide Californians with healthcare, higher education, welfare, parks, AIDS treatment and counseling, prisoner rehabilitation and other services. The cuts came atop other severe spending reductions in a separate $16-billion plan that the governor unveiled two weeks ago.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Nevada Pardons Board voted Friday to ease the prison term of Brian Hern, who has served 22 years behind bars for the beating death of his girlfriend's 3-year-old son in Las Vegas. In a 6-2 vote, the board agreed to reduce the no-parole life term being served by Hern, 45, to life with possible parole. That will let him go before the state Parole Board, a separate panel, and ask for his release. Hern was convicted in the February 1979 beating death of Curtis Fausett.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rich Dyer, a onetime nuclear foreman for the Department of Defense, tried to bury his former wife alive after she was granted custody of the couple's two children. He's serving a life sentence at the state prison here. Angelo Pleasant, a former wrestler, shot and killed two of his coaches when he caught them arguing over a woman. He's serving two life sentences. But Dyer and Pleasant do more than serve time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Mimi Silbert were to run a classified ad for her new Los Angeles venture, it might read, "Wanted: A few bad men and women." Silbert is the head of San Francisco's acclaimed Delancey Street Foundation, an enterprise grounded in the principle that drug addicts and ex-convicts can turn their lives around if they want to. The foundation bought the defunct Midtown Hilton on Vermont Avenue near the Hollywood Freeway earlier this year and will reopen it today as Delancey Street Los Angeles.
SPORTS
August 13, 1995 | ETHAN SKOLNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the gaze of a stately black bird and the rays of a sun hot enough to singe Lucifer, the rites of summer proceed without interruption. Handballs crash off walls, and sweaty palms swat them back again. A soccer ball floats through the air above the cacophony on the ground below. It could be a scene from summer camp; the players could be children, the chaperons seeking refuge in the shade could be counselors. But it's nothing like that.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite political and community support for Herman "Rock" Kreutzer's release, a parole board refused Thursday to free the onetime Wild West theme park owner convicted of gunning down his son-in-law in 1984. A three-member panel at the state prison in San Luis Obispo, where the 59-year-old Kreutzer is serving a sentence of 17 years to life, said Kreutzer needs to make more progress toward rehabilitation and accepting responsibility for his crime.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Funmaker surveys his congregation, a circle of bare-chested inmates squeezed into a low, beehive-shaped structure behind the wire and watchtowers of Chino state prison. The former convict-turned-spiritual adviser sees a vista of scars, tattoos and serious faces studded with dark eyes. Funmaker nods, satisfied that everyone is primed for the coming rite of fire and water. He speaks briefly to the group, stressing that favorable portents bless the gathering.
OPINION
April 29, 2006
Re "Parole in California: It's a crime," Current, April 23 The true crime is how much money is wasted each year by PhDs doing criminal justice research such as the opinions of the two authors of this article. Recidivism, and in particular "rehabilitation," in California has always been a joke in our law enforcement communities. As a taxpayer, I understand the dynamics of tail (unions) wagging the dog (administration). But even sadder is to read a comment such as: "But there's no denying that our high recidivism rate wastes human opportunity and disrupts family life in unquantifiable ways."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Thursday ordered California's top corrections official to reverse a recent decision abolishing drug treatment and other rehabilitation programs as possible sanctions for parole violators. In a victory for critics of California's widely maligned parole system, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton said that by failing to provide alternatives to a prison cell for parolees who slip up, state officials had violated a lawsuit settlement they reached in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Efforts to fix California's scandal-plagued youth prison system will flop unless the state stops housing young lawbreakers in remote "warehouses" and instead puts them in small living centers close to their homes, according to a report delivered Thursday to the Schwarzenegger administration. State officials said that they endorsed housing offenders in small groups, but that money to do so was unavailable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Who would have thought the Terminator would give bad guys a second chance? By embracing rehabilitation for felons, a strategy long given the cold shoulder in California prisons, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is veering sharply from the law-and-order mantra of his Republican Party.
OPINION
July 2, 2004
The prison reforms that an expert panel presented Thursday to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger are as dramatic as the prisons' failings. For decades, California's prison guards and their union have accumulated power, so that today they run the system. Prisoner rehabilitation is a shambles. California's recidivism rate, says the review panel's report, is the nation's worst. Schwarzenegger had asked the panel, led by former Gov.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Nevada Pardons Board voted Friday to ease the prison term of Brian Hern, who has served 22 years behind bars for the beating death of his girlfriend's 3-year-old son in Las Vegas. In a 6-2 vote, the board agreed to reduce the no-parole life term being served by Hern, 45, to life with possible parole. That will let him go before the state Parole Board, a separate panel, and ask for his release. Hern was convicted in the February 1979 beating death of Curtis Fausett.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | LEO W. BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Publishing a classy, well-written magazine is difficult under the best of circumstances. Doing it at a prison with inmate staffers would seem downright impossible. But that's just what is happening at the Arizona State Prison at Florence, where every two months inmates write, edit, paste up and print La Roca, a consistent award-winner in the National Penal Press Contest sponsored by Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the hills above Cottonwood the long, narrow road ends at the gate of an old military radar station. It is 5 a.m. The morning is as dark as the surrounding woods, full of snowy silence and biting cold, and the unwelcome voice that booms across the slumbering compound comes like that of an intruder. "Come on, people, let's get going," the public address system rasps. "This is your wake-up." Scores of feet hit the dormitory floor even before the last word is spoken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Supreme Court agreed unanimously Wednesday to review whether a serial rapist should remain locked up in a state mental hospital even though independent forensic psychologists have concluded he is no longer dangerous. The decision, made in a closed session, will keep Patrick Ghilotti, 45, at Atascadero State Hospital until the justices vote on his case after a Feb. 6 hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his final summation, an attorney for mass killer Edward Allaway told a judge Tuesday that after 25 years in state mental hospitals, the man who killed seven people at Cal State Fullerton can be safely released into society. "He should be watched like a hawk--but he can be watched like a hawk," said Deputy Public Defender John Bovee. After listening to one month of testimony, Superior Court Judge Frank F.
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