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Prisoner Rehabilitation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2003 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Ray Ortega had no hesitation when the police officer who arrested him for sleeping on a sidewalk in downtown Los Angeles' skid row offered him a choice: a trip to jail or entry into a rehabilitation program. Ortega, who has been homeless and in and out of jail for years on drug violations, chose drug treatment and avoided booking. "I was ready for something different; I just had to find the right time," Ortega, flushed and shaky, said recently in the small lounge of a social agency.
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NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Nevada Pardons Board voted Friday to ease the prison term of Brian Hern, who has served 22 years behind bars for the beating death of his girlfriend's 3-year-old son in Las Vegas. In a 6-2 vote, the board agreed to reduce the no-parole life term being served by Hern, 45, to life with possible parole. That will let him go before the state Parole Board, a separate panel, and ask for his release. Hern was convicted in the February 1979 beating death of Curtis Fausett.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Supreme Court agreed unanimously Wednesday to review whether a serial rapist should remain locked up in a state mental hospital even though independent forensic psychologists have concluded he is no longer dangerous. The decision, made in a closed session, will keep Patrick Ghilotti, 45, at Atascadero State Hospital until the justices vote on his case after a Feb. 6 hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his final summation, an attorney for mass killer Edward Allaway told a judge Tuesday that after 25 years in state mental hospitals, the man who killed seven people at Cal State Fullerton can be safely released into society. "He should be watched like a hawk--but he can be watched like a hawk," said Deputy Public Defender John Bovee. After listening to one month of testimony, Superior Court Judge Frank F.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | RUSS BYNUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kelly Burke proudly points to the list on his Web site containing the names of 62 criminals convicted of crimes from shoplifting to stalking, drunken driving to drug dealing. Some have served time. Many haven't. Burke, district attorney for Houston County near Macon, puts them all under one heading: "BANNED." These are the bad guys he's uprooted and banished from the county. "I do it all the time. I love it," Burke said. "We banish people frequently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some of the state's most violent inmates may be brought to Folsom for special training to change their behavior, under a plan proposed by the Department of Corrections. The proposal, which could start July 1, would send at least 380 violence-prone inmates through at least two years of classes, training and therapy at California State Prison, Sacramento, which adjoins Folsom State Prison. Death row inmates would not be included.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is unwise to walk the halls of a prison with a smile, so Billy Langston strains to keep up a "mad dog" look that tells other inmates not to mess with him. Yet despite his best efforts, the corners of his mouth keep winging upward against his will. A national prison advocacy group called Families Against Mandatory Minimums has argued to President Clinton that he is worthy of clemency, and every now and then a rush of hope takes over and Langston cannot help but smile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors are expected to decide today whether to convert apartments near Fountain Valley into a 50-bed halfway house for low-risk jail inmates on work furlough. The controversial proposal, approved by the county Planning Commission on a 3-2 vote Feb. 23, was appealed to the board by the city, which argues that such a facility is "inconsistent and incompatible" with the surrounding residential area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to revive a halfway house program for low-risk jail inmates on work furlough has alarmed residents of the neighborhood that would house the facility. If the Board of Supervisors signs off on the proposal, a 13-unit apartment building on a sliver of unincorporated county land between Fountain Valley and the Santa Ana River will be converted to a halfway house for 50 work furlough inmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | WILLOUGHBY MARIANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before police arrested her, 18-year-old Amanda didn't have to look very far for drama. There was plenty on the streets of San Diego, where she worked as a prostitute and scored drugs. Now that she's in the San Diego County Girls Rehabilitation Facility, a juvenile lockup, her excitement comes in another form: paperback novels. She's one of the 30 members of a special book club organized by a local juvenile judge. "Reading makes me feel better," Amanda said recently.
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