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Prisoner Rehabilitation

NEWS
February 16, 1998 | LISA MEYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"You ready?" Paris Nichols asks the 2-year-old girl sitting in a small plastic chair. She nods and smiles. Nichols is a big man. Humming like a machine, he lifts the chair, girl and all, and twirls them. She laughs and waves her hands. Two months ago, Nichols, 36, was in prison for selling drugs. Now he is part of a pioneering program that helps rehabilitate him and takes care of medically fragile children at the same time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1997 | PETER NOAH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wade Mixon, 39, graduated in November without a degree. He earned more important things: Sobriety. Work experience. A $4,000 savings account. Mixon graduated from STAIRS, a voluntary state Department of Corrections residential program that helps recently released parolees become self-sufficient. The parolees, who live in the Weingart Center, a downtown relief and referral agency for the homeless, are expected to adhere to their parole terms and the program's rigorous rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1996 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Project New Start specialized in raising women from the dead. It took in crack addicts, street prostitutes and prison inmates and transformed them into working professionals and responsible mothers. Such miracles earned the small, nonprofit organization a reputation as one of the more effective programs ever devised to rehabilitate female prisoners. Nevertheless, six years after its founding, Project New Start is about to face a death of its own, of the budgetary variety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti told representatives of an organization of black churches Monday night that he has drafted legislation requiring former inmates to pass high school equivalency exams as a condition of parole and probation. The leaders of Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches had proposed the idea to Garcetti about four months ago. On Monday night, Garcetti told the organization that he had taken steps to implement its proposal.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brenda Morrison, a Saulteaux Indian with a punk hairstyle and a flaming arrow tattooed on her left forearm, is a reservation kid from the Canadian prairie who dropped out of school and into trouble after her mother's early death. Now 33, she has lived much of the last decade in Kingston Women's Prison, an aging, notorious warehouse for Canada's most violent female inmates.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite political and community support for Herman "Rock" Kreutzer's release, a parole board refused Thursday to free the onetime Wild West theme park owner convicted of gunning down his son-in-law in 1984. A three-member panel at the state prison in San Luis Obispo, where the 59-year-old Kreutzer is serving a sentence of 17 years to life, said Kreutzer needs to make more progress toward rehabilitation and accepting responsibility for his crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 18-year-old carjacker and probation camp inmate furrowed his brow as he carefully tapped grains of orange sand out of a hollow tube, sketching a fine line around a mandala--a three-foot-wide sand painting. "When I came here, I didn't have no patience," said Jimmy, a Maywood gang member incarcerated at Camp David Gonzales who is studying the ancient art under Tibetan monks. "When somebody looked at me wrong, I'd hit them." "Now I got patience." An onlooking monk smiled approvingly.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the morning wind blew across the vast Caledonia Farm, men bent over makeshift tables, potting day lilies. Dressed in jackets, caps and gloves, each wore a bright orange vest with inmate printed across the back. Although some complained, no slackers are permitted. For that would mean a return to the Caledonia Correctional Institution to spend the day in lockup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995
Proponents who want to open a halfway house in North Long Beach knew their neighbors would be a hard-sell. For that reason they chose a quiet industrial area surrounded by warehouses to provide job training and housing to 50 nonviolent inmates nearing parole. "How could you find a better location?" said Bob Pratt, president of Volunteers of America, the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group behind the proposed facility.
SPORTS
August 13, 1995 | ETHAN SKOLNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the gaze of a stately black bird and the rays of a sun hot enough to singe Lucifer, the rites of summer proceed without interruption. Handballs crash off walls, and sweaty palms swat them back again. A soccer ball floats through the air above the cacophony on the ground below. It could be a scene from summer camp; the players could be children, the chaperons seeking refuge in the shade could be counselors. But it's nothing like that.
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