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Prisoner Releases China

NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China made several conciliatory gestures Friday on matters of concern to the United States, but at the same time it called on Communist Party members to enhance their "cohesion and combat capability" against unspecified foes. In a move apparently linked to Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
November 21, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese dissident Dai Qing was allowed to return home Wednesday, four days after authorities picked her up from a Beijing hotel to block her from meeting Secretary of State James A. Baker III or any of his aides during their visit here. Word of Dai's detention Saturday began to spread here shortly before Baker left Sunday to return to Washington. Her disappearance--which came while she was waiting for a telephone call from the U.S.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China has freed nine dissidents jailed without trial for their role in pro-democracy protests more than two years ago, an American human rights activist said. John Kamm, a Hong Kong businessman sometimes used by Beijing as a conduit for news about the fate of jailed dissidents, said the nine had been released since last November. The U.S.-based human rights group Asia Watch this month said more than 1,000 activists associated with the 1989 pro-democracy movement were still in jail.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Clinton Administration official opens talks in Beijing today amid signs that, with activist Harry Wu freed from a Chinese jail, the United States may be ready to make at least minor concessions to Beijing on the subject of Taiwan. China is now likely to pressure the Administration to reciprocate for its gesture in releasing Wu by giving some new assurances about Taiwan, which China considers part of its territory.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
Chinese police released the Boston-based editor of a dissident literary magazine on Saturday and sent him back to the United States, removing an irritant in shaky but improving China-U.S. ties. The editor, Bei Ling, arrived in San Francisco on Saturday. As he left Beijing, Bei said Chinese and U.S. diplomats arranged his release to smooth the way for President Jiang Zemin's trip to New York next month for a U.N. summit and talks with President Clinton.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture clearly aimed at influencing debate over China policy in Washington, one of China's longest-serving political prisoners was released today after serving 12 years of a 15-year sentence. Xu Wenli, 49, a former electrician and editor who was one of China's most prominent pro-democracy activists in the early 1980s, was released from Beijing No. 1 prison and driven to his home, where he embraced his wife and spoke briefly with reporters.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Chinese-born scholar from American University in Washington has been detained by Chinese police for nearly six weeks, and her husband and 5-year-old son were held separately for nearly a month before being reunited and allowed to leave China, a human rights group said Wednesday. Gao Zhan was picked up Feb. 11 at the Beijing airport with her husband and son as they were leaving after a family visit, Human Rights in China said.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania college librarian, detained in China since August, has been released after an appeal by members of a congressional delegation just back from Beijing, officials said. Rep. Patrick Toomey (R-Pa.), a member of the delegation, said Friday that the lawmakers told Chinese President Jiang Zemin that freeing the librarian, Song Yongyi, would help repair the troubled U.S.-China relationship. "We made the point upfront that we are for engagement" with China, Toomey said.
NEWS
May 27, 1996 | From Reuters
The only senior Chinese official to be imprisoned for backing the 1989 student pro-democracy protests ended his seven-year prison term today and then disappeared, his family said. "We have been told he is not in prison anymore," Bao Puliu, the son of Bao Tong, said by telephone. "But we have trouble finding him. "We don't know who has custody. He is not home. It appears he has disappeared," he said.
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