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Prisoners Florida

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NEWS
September 16, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Rosalie Martinez first laid eyes on serial killer Oscar Ray Bolin Jr., he had been brought from Florida's death row to a small holding cell in the county jail here to await the first of his three retrials. Convicted of the brutal rapes and murders 10 years ago of three young women, 35-year-old Bolin is considered by authorities to be a dangerous psychopath, a smooth-talking con man and an escape risk who has made direct threats on the lives of police.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 2003 | Paul Thomasch, Reuters
Forget Disney World, Miami's South Beach or the Florida Keys. For some of corporate America's best-known bad acts, the Florida destination of choice this year may be a spot just outside Fort Walton Beach, where they can relax in the sun, make a few phone calls or play an occasional game of tennis or softball. Welcome to Eglin Federal Prison, a minimum security facility where white-collar criminals dress in khaki uniforms, do manual labor and reside in dormitory-style facilities.
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NEWS
March 26, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The perennial American debate over the cruelty or value of the death penalty surfaced anew here Tuesday after a gruesome electric chair execution in which flames leaped from the head of a convicted murderer after the switch was thrown. Pedro Medina, a 39-year-old Cuban immigrant, was pronounced dead at 7:10 a.m.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A mentally disabled man who had been known as one of Florida's most prolific serial killers was released after 22 years in prison, cleared by DNA testing that did not exist when he was convicted. Jerry Frank Townsend, 49, was convicted in the early 1980s of six murders and one rape and had been serving concurrent life sentences.
NEWS
March 21, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the six years that she has toiled in a small optics laboratory here, Virginia McCormick says: "I've found my niche in life. This is what I want to do when I get out--out in the real world." The real world lies on the other side of the walls and barbed wire of the Broward Correctional Institution, Florida's maximum security prison for women. And between McCormick and freedom is a sentence that could stretch another two decades or more.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A killer who stabbed, raped and robbed a woman was executed Friday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected claims that Florida's electric chair was not working properly. The execution of Anthony Bertolotti, 38, was the first since the chair malfunctioned in May. It was carried out without any sign of problems, Gov. Bob Martinez's office reported. The Supreme Court rejected Bertolotti's last appeal about 30 minutes before he died.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government took its time--nearly a year--to tell Brett Bogle that part of the reason he is on death row may be because the FBI Crime Laboratory got it wrong. As far back as last September, the government knew that a key piece of evidence--a single strand of hair--had been misidentified by FBI examiner Michael Malone. But that crucial bit of information was not turned over to Bogle until recently and now he plans to use it to win himself a new trial.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | Associated Press
An inmate serving a life term in Florida State Prison was accidentally electrocuted with an electric drill, prison officials said. Gary Leroy Tucker, 32, was working on a fan in the prison's broom factory Thursday when the accident occurred, the officials said.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | From Newsday
A drunken German tourist spent 10 months in a Florida jail on hijacking charges after his slang demand to visit the bathroom during an airplane takeoff was misinterpreted as a bomb threat, according to a federal judge. The 23-year-old student, Johann Peter Grzeganek, told a flight attendant in broken English that the "roof would go" as she tried to get him to return to his seat on an American Transair L-1011 that was taking off from Ft. Lauderdale Airport bound for Hanover, Germany, Jan. 4.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | Reuters
Florida's governor ordered an inquiry into allegations that lawyers for death row inmates made $5 wagers on whether prisoners slated for death would be executed, a state spokeswoman said Friday. Gov. Lawton Chiles asked state investigators and the Florida Bar to determine the truth of allegations against attorneys in the Tampa office of the Capital Collateral Regional Counsel, the state agency that represents death row inmates, a Chiles spokeswoman said.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The recent murder convictions of Nathaniel Brazill and Lionel Tate, 14-year-old boys tried as adults, have prompted questions about how Florida handles young convicts, but prison officials said that few are housed with adult criminals. Florida has 406 convicted criminals under 18 in its adult prison system, state Department of Corrections spokeswoman Debbie Buchanan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Genetic evidence from a 1980 Seal Beach rape and murder scene has linked a Florida inmate to the crime, the California attorney general's office said Thursday. Benjamin Wayne Watta, 55, was identified when authorities ran the DNA evidence through the California DNA Convicted Felon Databank. He will be extradited and charged with first-degree murder, a Seal Beach police spokesman said.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
An inmate who died of cancer on death row 11 months ago has been cleared by DNA in the 1985 rape and murder of an 8-year-old girl, and an aide to Gov. Jeb Bush said Thursday that he is planning similar tests for other condemned prisoners. Frank Lee Smith died at age 52 after 14 years on death row for the slaying of Shandra Whitehead, who was raped, beaten and choked in her bedroom in Fort Lauderdale. Smith was scheduled for execution in 1990 but won a stay.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government took its time--nearly a year--to tell Brett Bogle that part of the reason he is on death row may be because the FBI Crime Laboratory got it wrong. As far back as last September, the government knew that a key piece of evidence--a single strand of hair--had been misidentified by FBI examiner Michael Malone. But that crucial bit of information was not turned over to Bogle until recently and now he plans to use it to win himself a new trial.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | Associated Press
Given a choice, Florida's death row inmates would rather be executed by lethal injection than in the electric chair, the state Department of Corrections said Tuesday. Two-thirds of the 366 inmates on death row had until Monday to inform the Florida State Prison warden if they wanted to go to the electric chair rather than be injected with a fatal combination of drugs. None did, the state Department of Corrections said. The remaining third have appeals pending before the Florida Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | Reuters
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush signed his first death warrants Wednesday for two convicted murderers who will face execution next month in a new electric chair that replaced the state's famous "Old Sparky." Thomas Provenzano, 50, is scheduled to die July 7 for the 1984 murder of a bailiff during a bloody rampage at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando. The execution of Allen Lee Davis, 54, for the 1982 murders of a mother and her two daughters is set for July 8.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
Presidential assailant Lynette (Squeaky) Fromme has been transferred from a high-security unit at the Lexington, Ky., federal correctional prison to a similar unit in Florida, federal prison spokesmen said. Fromme, who is serving a life sentence after attempting to assassinate President Gerald R. Ford in Sacramento in 1975, was transferred last Friday along with four other women to the correctional prison in Marianna, Fla.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal prison inmate suffering from AIDS was on his way to a private hospital Monday after a judge ruled that the U.S. Bureau of Prisons lacks adequate facilities to treat the disease. Lawyers in the case of Leonardo Botero Gomez, 43, said Monday that this is the first time a sentenced federal prisoner has been freed on bond for medical treatment and they are preparing a class-action lawsuit on behalf of all federal prisoners with AIDS.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 47-day hunger strike staged outside a remote Florida detention center is being credited for spurring U.S. immigration officials to release five convicted felons and to order speedy case reviews for about 3,500 others--including hundreds of California residents--being held indefinitely. The announcement from the U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly 13,000 prisoners serving time in Florida prisons may be eligible for early release following rulings made by the Florida Supreme Court. With much of Tallahassee, the capital, closed for the holidays, the state's highest court issued rulings in a pair of cases that affect inmates whose sentences were reduced in the 1980s to alleviate crowding in the prison system. Florida will appeal the rulings to the U.S. Supreme Court, a Florida Department of Corrections official said.
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