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Prisoners Mexico

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August 19, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A densely populated, self-contained village--known to many residents as el pueblito de La Mesa --thrives behind four whitewashed concrete walls amid a busy residential neighborhood in this border city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County man imprisoned for 6 1/2 years after being wrongly accused of molesting children at a Mexican orphanage will be released from an Ensenada prison next week, his attorneys predicted Friday. At the same time, a state judge in Mexico who conducted an independent investigation of the orphanage said she found evidence of widespread sexual abuse, including allegations that American visitors took children to empty rooms to molest them.
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NEWS
July 13, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS. Darling reported from Mexico City, Rotella from San Diego
Mexico will not accept 658 Chinese immigrants currently detained at sea by the U.S Coast Guard, saying it is up to the United States to resolve the six-day crisis, Mexican officials asserted Monday. After a weekend in which U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County man imprisoned for 6 1/2 years after being wrongly accused of molesting children at a Mexican orphanage will be released from an Ensenada prison next week, his attorney predicted Friday. At the same time, a state judge in Mexico who conducted an independent investigation of the orphanage said she found evidence of sexual abuse, including allegations that American visitors took children to empty rooms to molest them.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Oliverio Chavez was convicted of heroin dealing five years ago, his first impulse was to escape from prison, which he did in 1987. But after the airplane mechanic was recaptured two years ago, police here believe, he decided that he could run his business just as effectively from prison in Matamoros, a city across the border from Brownsville, Tex.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alejandro Hernandez knows much more about extortion today than he did when he was arrested for that crime two years ago. Unable to meet his $11,000 bail, he has been subjected to what he calls systematic extortion at the prison on the northern limits of Mexico City where he is being held awaiting trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts to extradite Rene Cruz Reynoso, an American who fled to Mexico after he was accused of paying $2,000 to have his landlord killed, appear to have collapsed despite the cooperation of Mexican law enforcement agencies, Los Angeles police said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A government human rights commission has found that two Huichol Indians charged with killing a U.S. journalist were illegally detained and possibly tortured by soldiers. Under Mexican law, soldiers are not allowed to arrest civilians in criminal cases.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven days after a Marine sergeant was jailed in Baja California, Mexico, for weapons violations after inadvertently driving across the border while on duty, a group of U.S. congressmen demanded his immediate release Wednesday. Sgt. Brian Johnston, 23, assigned to a transportation battalion at Camp Pendleton, had been sent by his superiors to the San Ysidro border crossing to pick up two Marines and mistakenly got into a traffic lane that took him into Mexico, said Navy spokesman Lt.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Jorge Estrada!" A Mexican immigration official searched the roomful of boys for the one she wanted. Sullen-faced, in heavy-metal T-shirts and worn pants, the boys stared back. They were the weekly group of illegal immigrant children deported to Mexico from Los Angeles and Orange counties, where they had been arrested, mostly for stealing. Every Thursday morning they arrive, bleary-eyed from the trip, shuffling into the Mexican immigration office at the Otay Mesa border crossing in Tijuana.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture welcomed by human rights activists, Mexican President Vicente Fox met Tuesday with supporters of two environmental activists imprisoned here and asked his lawyers to review their case for possible injustices, government officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Los Angeles environmentalists, politicians and activists has begun lobbying for the release of two Mexican farmers who led efforts to save a forest near their village. Rodolfo Montiel and Teodoro Cabrera, who were convicted of drug trafficking this year, are the focus of a national campaign coordinated by the Sierra Club and Amnesty International.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | BEN FOX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Just a few miles outside the United States, six American men live a world away. Crowded into a damp and stuffy 10-by-18-foot windowless cell, the men pass around well-read copies of U.S. newspapers and wait for the weekly aid package that helps them survive in the Tijuana prison known as "El Pueblito," or the Little Village. Home to more U.S.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Imprisoned "peasant ecologist" leader Rodolfo Montiel has won the prestigious $125,000 Goldman Environmental Prize. Montiel, 44, led a band of peasants fighting to protect forests in Guerrero state. The prize was one of six the San Francisco-based Goldman Environmental Foundation awards annually.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven days after a Marine sergeant was jailed in Baja California, Mexico, for weapons violations after inadvertently driving across the border while on duty, a group of U.S. congressmen demanded his immediate release Wednesday. Sgt. Brian Johnston, 23, assigned to a transportation battalion at Camp Pendleton, had been sent by his superiors to the San Ysidro border crossing to pick up two Marines and mistakenly got into a traffic lane that took him into Mexico, said Navy spokesman Lt.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A government human rights commission has found that two Huichol Indians charged with killing a U.S. journalist were illegally detained and possibly tortured by soldiers. Under Mexican law, soldiers are not allowed to arrest civilians in criminal cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weak, tired and suffering the effects of enduring 39 days of captivity in Mexico on weapons charges, Scott McClung arrived home three months ago seeking to resume the life of a charter boat captain. Since then, McClung has taken on a new role: media darling. The Newport Beach man has been interviewed by numerous newspaper reporters and was featured on television's "Inside Edition" and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's "Hour of Power." Even NBC's "Dateline" has shown an interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Duarte man wanted in the fatal shooting of a popular West Covina vocational school teacher has escaped from a Mexicali jail and is being sought in Mexico and this country, Mexican and local authorities said Friday. Martin Anthony Meza, who is suspected of killing Carolyn Vasquez, 36, and wounding two others Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weak, tired and suffering the effects of enduring 39 days of captivity in Mexico on weapons charges, Scott McClung arrived home three months ago seeking to resume the life of a charter boat captain. Since then, McClung has taken on a new role: media darling. The Newport Beach man has been interviewed by numerous newspaper reporters and was featured on television's "Inside Edition" and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's "Hour of Power." Even NBC's "Dateline" has shown an interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1998 | DAVID REYES
Ship captain Scott McClung on Thursday leveled harsh criticism against U.S. and Mexican officials for his lengthy detention in Cozumel and said he intends to go to Mexico next week to participate in an investigation of a prosecutor who allegedly sought a $10,000 bribe. McClung, the 36-year-old skipper charged with violating Mexican weapons laws, said in a news conference in Irvine that the U.S. Consulate's office in Merida, Yucatan, was urged to help him but that little was done in the case.
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