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Prisoners Of War Russia

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NEWS
June 16, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said Monday that some U.S. prisoners captured during the Vietnam War were moved to labor camps in the Soviet Union, and he speculated that some may still be alive. "Our archives have shown that it is true--some of them were transferred to the territory of the former U.S.S.R. and were kept in labor camps," Yeltsin told NBC News in an interview aboard his presidential jet en route from Moscow to Washington.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until two years ago, Darlene Ticehurst believed what the United States government told her about her brother, an Air Force pilot whose plane apparently was shot down over North Korea in 1951. Though shocked and saddened at the news, she accepted a Department of Defense explanation that her only brother had disappeared on a mission and was presumed dead.
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NEWS
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to heal a valued neighbor's historic wounds, apologized Tuesday for the cruel treatment and deaths of Japanese prisoners in his country after World War II and agreed that a dispute over four small islands Moscow seized from Japan must be resolved.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to heal a valued neighbor's historic wounds, apologized Tuesday for the cruel treatment and deaths of Japanese prisoners in his country after World War II and agreed that a dispute over four small islands Moscow seized from Japan must be resolved.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Russian team searching for American prisoners of war and soldiers missing in action has yet to uncover information leading to any living American service personnel, and there are only minuscule chances that such individuals exist here, officials said Thursday. "I, for one, believe that the probability of finding an American (POW or MIA) in Russia today is close to nil," said Gen. Dmitri Volkogonov, the Russian chairman of the joint commission on the fate of American POWs and MIAs.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New evidence found in the recently opened top-secret KGB archives shows that some American citizens imprisoned by Soviet authorities during and after World War II are still alive and living in the former Soviet republics, according to an article published in a Russian newspaper Thursday. "(We must) find them to correct the injustices against them and give them a chance to contact relatives currently living in the United States," Col. Gen.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this isolated, wind-scoured reservation town in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, the riddle of Joe Danens is an eerie local fragment of a seemingly eternal national mystery: What really happened to thousands of American servicemen who disappeared in Vietnam and Korea and countless Cold War skirmishes? The question of Danens' fate has haunted his family for more than 40 years--ever since his PBRY2 Privateer spy plane and its 10 crew members disappeared over the Baltic Sea on April 8, 1950.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't long ago that Mikhail S. Gorbachev came here, dined at the White House with President Bush, spoke as an esteemed guest to members of Congress and was hailed as a "hero of world peace" by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley. Starting this week, the VIP welcome mat may no longer be out. Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
Russia invited U.S. officials to a northern prison camp Thursday to investigate reports that the former Communist government may have held an American pilot shot down during the Korean War. The invitation to American members of a joint U.S.-Russian commission on POWs followed President Boris N. Yeltsin's statements this week that American servicemen might still be on Russian soil. Yeltsin's spokesman, Vyacheslav V. Kostikov, said 2,800 U.S.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Pentagon officials struggled with the shock waves set off by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's remarks about POWs, a team of U.S. and Russian investigators arrived Thursday at a remote prison camp far north of Moscow to investigate claims that a missing U.S. airman had been seen there alive. Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams said that a Russian source approached U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Russian team searching for American prisoners of war and soldiers missing in action has yet to uncover information leading to any living American service personnel, and there are only minuscule chances that such individuals exist here, officials said Thursday. "I, for one, believe that the probability of finding an American (POW or MIA) in Russia today is close to nil," said Gen. Dmitri Volkogonov, the Russian chairman of the joint commission on the fate of American POWs and MIAs.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1948, New York-born Stefan Dovgulevich, 20, went to the U.S. Embassy here, declared his allegiance to America and received a U.S. passport. But when he applied to Soviet authorities for permission to leave, his U.S. passport was replaced with a Soviet one, and he was thrown into a Stalinist labor camp. Dovgulevich's name was one of 39 on a list published Friday of Americans who were caught in Soviet territory during or after World War II and were imprisoned in Soviet labor camps.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New evidence found in the recently opened top-secret KGB archives shows that some American citizens imprisoned by Soviet authorities during and after World War II are still alive and living in the former Soviet republics, according to an article published in a Russian newspaper Thursday. "(We must) find them to correct the injustices against them and give them a chance to contact relatives currently living in the United States," Col. Gen.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this isolated, wind-scoured reservation town in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, the riddle of Joe Danens is an eerie local fragment of a seemingly eternal national mystery: What really happened to thousands of American servicemen who disappeared in Vietnam and Korea and countless Cold War skirmishes? The question of Danens' fate has haunted his family for more than 40 years--ever since his PBRY2 Privateer spy plane and its 10 crew members disappeared over the Baltic Sea on April 8, 1950.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Bush's special envoy said Tuesday that there probably is no living American POW involuntarily inside the former Soviet Union. Malcolm Toon said he had encountered "some puzzlement" among Russian officials about why President Boris N. Yeltsin had suggested that there were Americans still in captivity.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After days of intensified searching for signs of missing American prisoners of war, envoy Malcolm Toon said Friday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin must have been confused or mistaken when he held out the hope that American POWs could still be alive in the former Soviet Union. "It is clear to me that he misspoke," Toon said of Yeltsin's sensational comments during last week's Russian-American summit, "because we have found nobody here that will tell us that Mr.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Bush's special envoy said Tuesday that there probably is no living American POW involuntarily inside the former Soviet Union. Malcolm Toon said he had encountered "some puzzlement" among Russian officials about why President Boris N. Yeltsin had suggested that there were Americans still in captivity.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly frustrated by the world's inability to stop the carnage in Yugoslavia, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Saturday it would be possible to create an international air squadron to bomb the Serbian fighters besieging Sarajevo if peaceful methods don't work.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The search for information on U.S. prisoners of war missing in Russia shifted Sunday to the industrial city of Tambov after documents were found showing that as many as 2,500 Western soldiers, including Americans, were held in labor camps there after World War II.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly frustrated by the world's inability to stop the carnage in Yugoslavia, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Saturday it would be possible to create an international air squadron to bomb the Serbian fighters besieging Sarajevo if peaceful methods don't work.
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