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Prisoners Of War

NATIONAL
October 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
All former American prisoners of war who have suffered from heart disease or have had a stroke will receive government healthcare benefits without having to prove the ailments were linked to their captivity, Veterans Affairs Secretary Anthony J. Principi said. He announced the benefits while addressing the annual convention of the American Ex-Prisoners of War, an Arlington-based group with about 21,000 members nationwide.
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WORLD
August 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Ethiopia and Eritrea said they have agreed to release all the prisoners of war still languishing in detention from the nations' 1998-2000 border conflict, officials said. The holding of hundreds of prisoners by both countries long after hostilities ceased has hindered efforts to improve relations that remain strained despite the demarcation of a new boundary in April.
NEWS
January 19, 1991
A battalion of BRITAIN'S MOST FAMOUS REGIMENTS--the Coldstream Guards, established in 1650--is going to the Persian Gulf to handle Iraqi prisoners of war. More air force reservists have been called up to ease strain on the supply lines. Total British troops: 31,000
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | Associated Press
A total of 279 Iraqi prisoners of war released by Iran arrived Thursday in Baghdad, the official Iraqi News Agency reported. Their arrival followed the release by Iraq and return to Tehran the previous day of 238 Iranian POWs. This was the first exchange between the two countries in nearly two months.
WORLD
September 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Investigators from the British and U.S. militaries have cleared a British officer of allegations that he mistreated prisoners of war in Iraq, the Ministry of Defense said Monday. Ministry of Defense police concluded that no criminal proceedings should be undertaken against Col. Tim Collins, who made headlines on the eve of war with a stirring speech to his unit, the 1st Battalion of the Royal Irish Regiment. The investigation was prompted by a U.S.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
Three African National Congress guerrillas who refused to take part in their murder trial because they claimed to be prisoners of war were sentenced to death in Johannesburg for four killings. The three wore olive-green military uniforms with ANC colors throughout the proceedings. Their only active role in the trial came when one read a statement that said: "We are soldiers in a patriotic army struggling to establish democracy and peace. We believe that we are prisoners of war." Jabu Masina, 36, Ting-Ting Masango, 28, and Neo Potsane, 27, were convicted of killing two black policemen, a black town council member and the council member's sister-in law.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a shift that could break its postwar deadlock with Iraq, Iran offered to exchange prisoners of war simultaneously with an Iraqi withdrawal from its border territory. The official new agency IRNA said Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati laid out Iran's new position to a U.N. envoy in Tehran "to help break the present artificial impasse which benefits no one."
NATIONAL
July 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
American prisoners of war tortured by Iraq in the 1991 Persian Gulf War cannot be compensated from Iraqi bank accounts seized by the U.S. government, a federal judge ruled. The decision is a financial and legal victory for the Bush administration, which fought to block 17 former POWs and 37 family members from claiming the frozen accounts to pay some of the record $653-million judgment they won earlier this month against Saddam Hussein's government.
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