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Prisoners Of War

NATIONAL
November 11, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, taking up its first challenge to the Bush administration's handling of the war on terrorism, agreed Monday to decide whether the president has the power to imprison hundreds of captured foreigners at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, without giving them a chance to show that they are innocent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iraqi doctors who treated former prisoner of war Jessica Lynch dismissed on Friday claims made in her authorized biography that she was raped by her Iraqi captors. Although Lynch said she has no memory of the sexual assault, medical records cited in "I Am a Soldier, Too: The Jessica Lynch Story," due for release Tuesday, indicate that she was raped and sodomized by her Iraqi captors following an ambush on her Army convoy. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2003 | From Associated Press
The authorized biography of former prisoner-of-war Pfc. Jessica Lynch says she was raped by her Iraqi captors, a family spokesman said Thursday. "The book does cover the subject," spokesman Stephen Goodwin told the Associated Press. "It's a very difficult subject." The book -- "I Am a Soldier, Too: The Jessica Lynch Story" -- is being released by Knopf publishing on Tuesday, Veterans Day. Reporter Rick Bragg, who wrote the book, tells Lynch's story.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An Iraqi lawyer who helped U.S. forces in the rescue of Jessica Lynch toured the soldier's hometown of Palestine and visited a garden planted in his honor. "I will not forget. It will stay with me, in my mind, in my heart," said Mohammed al-Rehaief as he helped plant a ceremonial yellow mum. But al-Rehaief was unable to meet with Lynch during a four-day tour of the state.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Military prosecutors say they are so overworked they need to delay the case against a Muslim chaplain accused of mishandling secrets at the Guantanamo Bay prison for terrorist suspects, the chaplain's lawyer said. Military trial rules require hearings for Capt. James Joseph Yee by Dec. 10, defense lawyer Eugene Fidell said. No hearings have been scheduled, and military prosecutors want that deadline delayed by another 45 days, Fidell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
An Iraqi prisoner whose death sparked an investigation into treatment of prisoners by Marines died of a broken neck after being grabbed by the throat by a Marine, officials said Tuesday. The Marine and his superior officer are now charged with negligent homicide in the death of the 52-year-old prisoner at the Whitehorse detention camp near the city of Nasiriyah. The charge carries a maximum penalty of three years in prison.
WORLD
September 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Investigators from the British and U.S. militaries have cleared a British officer of allegations that he mistreated prisoners of war in Iraq, the Ministry of Defense said Monday. Ministry of Defense police concluded that no criminal proceedings should be undertaken against Col. Tim Collins, who made headlines on the eve of war with a stirring speech to his unit, the 1st Battalion of the Royal Irish Regiment. The investigation was prompted by a U.S.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Jessica Lynch, the injured Army private and prisoner of war who was retrieved from an Iraqi hospital by American commandos, has been discharged from the military, the Army said Wednesday. "She's been medically retired" because of disability from injuries, said Beverly Chidel, a spokeswoman at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
American prisoners of war tortured by Iraq in the 1991 Persian Gulf War cannot be compensated from Iraqi bank accounts seized by the U.S. government, a federal judge ruled. The decision is a financial and legal victory for the Bush administration, which fought to block 17 former POWs and 37 family members from claiming the frozen accounts to pay some of the record $653-million judgment they won earlier this month against Saddam Hussein's government.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Assets seized from the Iraqi government should be used to rebuild the country and not to compensate 17 Americans held captive in Iraq during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Justice Department lawyers told a judge Tuesday. Attorneys for the former prisoners of war argued that a 1996 federal law should give them access to the money. The case before U.S. District Judge Richard W.
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