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OPINION
April 11, 2004
Re "Prison Held Gang Members in Lockdown for Almost 2 Years," April 8: The prison officials are to be applauded for locking down prisoners who are hellbent on being disruptive and a danger to other inmates. Prisoners' rights are directly tied to their willingness to follow the rules of incarceration. Sadly, prisoners' rights advocates fail to accept this premise. Officials reported that those in the extended lockdown refused to make a pledge to not initiate further violence. Let us not forget that while in the 20-month lockdown, these inmates did not injure or kill another prisoner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A prisoners' rights lawyer says Monday's federal judge's order allowing California prison doctors to force-feed inmates on hunger strike "violates international law and generally accepted medical ethics. " Force-feeding "should only be used as a last resort, but here there are a number of reasonable alternatives,” said Jules Lobel, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who represents many of the hunger strike leaders in their related lawsuit over solitary confinement conditions at Pelican Bay State Prison.
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NEWS
March 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
A prisoner's civil rights lawsuit against five Corcoran State Prison guards has been thrown out of court by a federal judge. Inmate Ronnie Dewberry represented himself in the case against five officers until it was dismissed late Tuesday. Dewberry, a convicted killer from Oakland, said he was put into the now-infamous security housing unit's exercise yard at the prison with his enemies and was wounded by a gas gun fired to break up a fight in which he was involved.
OPINION
August 10, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Convicted murderers, gang leaders and other hardened criminals tend not to draw much sympathy from readers. But the hunger strike taking place in California prisons, which is entering its second month and has drawn prolonged attention to the solitary-confinement conditions in which thousands of inmates are housed, may have changed that. When the strike started, many of the readers who sent us letters were content to let starvation take its course with the protesting inmates; some even suggested it was a good way to address overcrowding.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | SHEILA HOTCHKIN and MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A comprehensive review of conditions facing women in American prisons has found that incidents of rape, sexual abuse and medical neglect are widespread among inmates nationwide. The study, released Thursday by the human rights group Amnesty International, cited unacceptable conditions in prisons and jails for many female inmates, whose numbers have tripled in the last 15 years to about 138,000.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Male prisoners have a constitutional right to procreate by means of artificial insemination, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday. The 2-1 decision, the first of its kind by a federal appellate court, comes in the case of William Reno Gerber, a 41-year-old third-strike convict now serving a 111-year sentence for negligently discharging a firearm, making terrorist threats and possessing a handgun as an ex-felon.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alejandro Hernandez knows much more about extortion today than he did when he was arrested for that crime two years ago. Unable to meet his $11,000 bail, he has been subjected to what he calls systematic extortion at the prison on the northern limits of Mexico City where he is being held awaiting trial.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned the death sentence of a mentally disturbed murderer who was being forcibly medicated by Louisiana prison officials so that he could be executed. The case of Michael Owen Perry has been the most closely watched death penalty case of the current term because it tested the willingness of the court's dominant conservatives to uphold executions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989 | T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
When a woman reporter told Parole Officer Hugh Alcott that she wanted to interview convicted murderer Raymond George after his release to a North Hollywood neighborhood two weeks ago, Alcott responded in horror: "I think you're crazy as hell if you do. He likes to chop up women." The next day, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal class-action suits have been filed by lawyers representing inmates in Yolo and Placer counties, contending that jails in the two counties are overcrowded and violate prisoners' constitutional rights. Placer County Sheriff Donald Nunes and Yolo County Sheriff Gary Lipelt are named in the suits, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court by the Prisoners Rights Union, a statewide advocacy group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
About 30,000 California prisoners this week began what could potentially be the biggest prison hunger strike in state history. Out of curiosity, I checked out the petition containing the prisoners' demands. The first signature belongs to Todd Ashker, a convicted killer incarcerated at Pelican Bay. He doesn't sound so bad when you check him out at “ Write a Prisoner ,” the prison pen pal website. Born under the astrological sign of Cancer, he just turned 50, is separated, and in 2008, earned a paralegal degree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's bid to end court oversight of the care it gives about 33,000 mentally ill inmates was heard Wednesday by a federal judge who voiced concern that he had only days to weigh thousands of pages of contradictory claims and issue a decision. Gov. Jerry Brown's motion to end oversight, filed in early January, triggered a federal law that requires a decision in 90 days. Documents produced in court show the state began its own preparation in late 2011, when it hired experts to review the adequacy of inmate care.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The lawyers who spent years fighting to free prisoners at Guantanamo Bay thought they had won in 2008, when the Supreme Court gave detainees a right to go to court and Barack Obama was elected president. But things haven't worked out as they had hoped. Last month, President Obama reversed a campaign promise and announced plans to keep prisoners at Guantanamo indefinitely. Congress has blocked moving any prisoners from the Cuba detention center to this country, even for a trial.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian
In a trial that never became the referendum on abortion that some abortion foes wanted, Scott Roeder, a 51-year-old airport shuttle driver, was convicted Friday of murdering George Tiller, one the nation's few physicians who performed late-term abortions. When he was slain in the vestibule of his church last May 31, Tiller became the eighth doctor since 1993 to be killed by antiabortion extremists. In June, his family announced that his clinic would close permanently. The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for only 37 minutes before finding Roeder guilty of premeditated murder.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2009 | Dean Kuipers
Civil rights activists plan to file a lawsuit today contesting the transfer of a Tunisian American prisoner to a federal prison facility that some inmates have dubbed "Little Guantanamo." The suit by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of Sabri Benkahla could be the first of many challenging the secretive units, which drastically restrict outside contact. Benkahla was transferred to the Communications Management Unit in Terre Haute, Ind.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2009 | Greg Miller
In the bitter debate over the nation's counter-terrorism policies, former Vice President Dick Cheney has introduced an assertion that substantially raises the stakes. Twice in the last two weeks -- including during his speaking duel with President Obama on Thursday -- Cheney has said that the Bush administration's approach may have saved "hundreds of thousands" of lives. It is a claim that goes beyond anything Cheney or former President George W.
NEWS
July 24, 1989
Regular visitors picketed the California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi to protest what they called inadequate visiting facilities. Susan Brown, director of the Prisoners Rights Union, which provides information to inmates and their families, said 120 people are jammed into a visiting room that can comfortably accommodate only half that number. She charged that visitors are being "treated like criminals, like they are guilty by association."
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by prison officials and correctional officers, a state Senate committee Monday approved a bill repealing the "prisoners bill of rights" that grants inmates several privileges, including conjugal visits and the right to receive hard-core pornographic and racist writings. The bill by Sen. Robert Presley (D-Riverside) would give inmates only the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2009 | David G. Savage
The new deputy solicitor general for the Obama administration urged the Supreme Court on Monday to go slow in giving prisoners a right to seek DNA testing that could free them. "Our position is there is no constitutional right to DNA," Neal Katyal, a former Georgetown University law professor, told the justices. He said establishing a right to DNA testing for inmates could "open the floodgates" to lawsuits seeking new tests of old evidence.
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