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OPINION
April 11, 2004
Re "Prison Held Gang Members in Lockdown for Almost 2 Years," April 8: The prison officials are to be applauded for locking down prisoners who are hellbent on being disruptive and a danger to other inmates. Prisoners' rights are directly tied to their willingness to follow the rules of incarceration. Sadly, prisoners' rights advocates fail to accept this premise. Officials reported that those in the extended lockdown refused to make a pledge to not initiate further violence. Let us not forget that while in the 20-month lockdown, these inmates did not injure or kill another prisoner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A prisoners' rights lawyer says Monday's federal judge's order allowing California prison doctors to force-feed inmates on hunger strike "violates international law and generally accepted medical ethics. " Force-feeding "should only be used as a last resort, but here there are a number of reasonable alternatives,” said Jules Lobel, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who represents many of the hunger strike leaders in their related lawsuit over solitary confinement conditions at Pelican Bay State Prison.
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NEWS
March 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
A prisoner's civil rights lawsuit against five Corcoran State Prison guards has been thrown out of court by a federal judge. Inmate Ronnie Dewberry represented himself in the case against five officers until it was dismissed late Tuesday. Dewberry, a convicted killer from Oakland, said he was put into the now-infamous security housing unit's exercise yard at the prison with his enemies and was wounded by a gas gun fired to break up a fight in which he was involved.
OPINION
August 10, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Convicted murderers, gang leaders and other hardened criminals tend not to draw much sympathy from readers. But the hunger strike taking place in California prisons, which is entering its second month and has drawn prolonged attention to the solitary-confinement conditions in which thousands of inmates are housed, may have changed that. When the strike started, many of the readers who sent us letters were content to let starvation take its course with the protesting inmates; some even suggested it was a good way to address overcrowding.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | SHEILA HOTCHKIN and MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A comprehensive review of conditions facing women in American prisons has found that incidents of rape, sexual abuse and medical neglect are widespread among inmates nationwide. The study, released Thursday by the human rights group Amnesty International, cited unacceptable conditions in prisons and jails for many female inmates, whose numbers have tripled in the last 15 years to about 138,000.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Male prisoners have a constitutional right to procreate by means of artificial insemination, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday. The 2-1 decision, the first of its kind by a federal appellate court, comes in the case of William Reno Gerber, a 41-year-old third-strike convict now serving a 111-year sentence for negligently discharging a firearm, making terrorist threats and possessing a handgun as an ex-felon.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alejandro Hernandez knows much more about extortion today than he did when he was arrested for that crime two years ago. Unable to meet his $11,000 bail, he has been subjected to what he calls systematic extortion at the prison on the northern limits of Mexico City where he is being held awaiting trial.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is how the justice system used to work in this country: Debtors were routinely locked up. Peasants could spend decades in prison for stealing and eating a cow. Suspects languished eight years behind bars awaiting a verdict, were found innocent, then had to remain in prison while prosecutors appealed--sometimes all the way to the Supreme Court.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2009 | Greg Miller
The CIA's secret prisons are being shuttered. Harsh interrogation techniques are off-limits. And Guantanamo Bay will eventually go back to being a wind-swept naval base on the southeastern corner of Cuba. But even while dismantling these programs, President Obama left intact an equally controversial counter-terrorism tool.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned the death sentence of a mentally disturbed murderer who was being forcibly medicated by Louisiana prison officials so that he could be executed. The case of Michael Owen Perry has been the most closely watched death penalty case of the current term because it tested the willingness of the court's dominant conservatives to uphold executions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
About 30,000 California prisoners this week began what could potentially be the biggest prison hunger strike in state history. Out of curiosity, I checked out the petition containing the prisoners' demands. The first signature belongs to Todd Ashker, a convicted killer incarcerated at Pelican Bay. He doesn't sound so bad when you check him out at “ Write a Prisoner ,” the prison pen pal website. Born under the astrological sign of Cancer, he just turned 50, is separated, and in 2008, earned a paralegal degree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's bid to end court oversight of the care it gives about 33,000 mentally ill inmates was heard Wednesday by a federal judge who voiced concern that he had only days to weigh thousands of pages of contradictory claims and issue a decision. Gov. Jerry Brown's motion to end oversight, filed in early January, triggered a federal law that requires a decision in 90 days. Documents produced in court show the state began its own preparation in late 2011, when it hired experts to review the adequacy of inmate care.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The lawyers who spent years fighting to free prisoners at Guantanamo Bay thought they had won in 2008, when the Supreme Court gave detainees a right to go to court and Barack Obama was elected president. But things haven't worked out as they had hoped. Last month, President Obama reversed a campaign promise and announced plans to keep prisoners at Guantanamo indefinitely. Congress has blocked moving any prisoners from the Cuba detention center to this country, even for a trial.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2010 | By David G. Savage
According to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, a prisoner who was slammed to a concrete floor and punched and kicked by a guard after asking for a grievance form -- but suffered neither serious nor permanent harm -- has no claim that his constitutional rights were violated. Thomas objected when the high court, in a little-noted recent opinion, said this unprovoked and malicious assault by a North Carolina prison guard amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. The court's decision came a few days after Thomas' now-famous former law clerk John C. Yoo was charged with flawed reasoning, but not professional misconduct, as a Justice Department lawyer when he applied much the same view toward the treatment of Al Qaeda prisoners.
WORLD
February 14, 2010
During a visit to the Tehran military courthouse one day last fall, Hossein and Hamid spotted the doctor. Memories from their five days at Kahrizak prison came flooding back. Prisoners seeking help were handed a few aspirin and told to go away. When they asked for bandages, the doctor struck some lightly with a club. One inmate had been beaten so badly on his feet that his toes were swollen and infected and he couldn't walk properly. He arranged for an appointment with the doctor, who told him, "Get lost before I beat you up," according to Hossein, who said he didn't even bother asking for help for his own injuries.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian
In a trial that never became the referendum on abortion that some abortion foes wanted, Scott Roeder, a 51-year-old airport shuttle driver, was convicted Friday of murdering George Tiller, one the nation's few physicians who performed late-term abortions. When he was slain in the vestibule of his church last May 31, Tiller became the eighth doctor since 1993 to be killed by antiabortion extremists. In June, his family announced that his clinic would close permanently. The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for only 37 minutes before finding Roeder guilty of premeditated murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
About 30,000 California prisoners this week began what could potentially be the biggest prison hunger strike in state history. Out of curiosity, I checked out the petition containing the prisoners' demands. The first signature belongs to Todd Ashker, a convicted killer incarcerated at Pelican Bay. He doesn't sound so bad when you check him out at “ Write a Prisoner ,” the prison pen pal website. Born under the astrological sign of Cancer, he just turned 50, is separated, and in 2008, earned a paralegal degree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989 | T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
When a woman reporter told Parole Officer Hugh Alcott that she wanted to interview convicted murderer Raymond George after his release to a North Hollywood neighborhood two weeks ago, Alcott responded in horror: "I think you're crazy as hell if you do. He likes to chop up women." The next day, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2010 | By David G. Savage
A group of dangerous sex criminals who took their case before the Supreme Court on Tuesday had one clear champion: Justice Antonin Scalia. A staunch conservative, he has not developed new sympathy for criminals. Instead, the issue before the court was whether the Constitution gave the federal government the power to lock up offenders after they had served their prison terms. Scalia said protecting the public against sex criminals was a matter for the states, their police and their prisons.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2010 | By David G. Savage
With a wide war on terrorism still being fought, an appellate court said Tuesday that Guantanamo Bay prison detainees had few legal rights, so long as the government could show they fought for or actively supported the Taliban or Al Qaeda. A three-judge panel of the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the government's broad power to hold indefinitely suspected former Taliban fighters and their supporters who were captured abroad and sent to the U.S. military prison in Cuba.
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