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NATIONAL
July 24, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Responding to criticism of secrecy within the immigration detention system, federal officials launched an online service Friday to help relatives and attorneys find detainees in the sprawling networks of prisons and jails. In the past, locating a relative was cumbersome, time-consuming and sometimes impossible, requiring numerous phone calls to detention centers around the nation. The public, Internet-based tool is designed to fix that, said Phyllis Coven, acting director of detention policy and planning for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
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OPINION
August 15, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
After nearly a decade of inaction, the Federal Communications Commission is finally stepping in to regulate how much telephone companies may charge for interstate calls made by prison and jail inmates and immigration detainees. That's a welcome move that will put an end to an unfair practice that allowed telephone companies to gouge inmates and their families. Under the new regulations, which were announced late last week, telephone providers may only charge up to 21 cents for a debit or prepaid call within the United States, and up to 25 cents for domestic collect calls made by inmates.
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NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
More Americans are employed by government than at any previous time in the nation's history, a growth helped by a boom in jobs at prisons and jails, a Census Bureau report showed today. "Corrections is the fastest-growing segment" of government employment across the country, said Meredith De Hart, a social science analyst at the Census Bureau. Overall, employment of federal, state and local governments totaled a record 17.3 million people as of October, 1987. But while that represented an increase of 2.1% from 1986, employment in corrections jumped 9.5% to 425,000, the report said.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Young people are being held for long periods of time in solitary confinement in prisons and jails, a practice that should be eliminated, two advocacy groups said Wednesday. A report released by the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch found that those younger than 18 are being held in solitary confinement for weeks or months at a time, especially teenagers who are lodged in adult facilities. The isolation “causes anguish, provokes serious mental and physical health problems, and works against rehabilitation for teenagers,” the report found.
NEWS
April 21, 1989
More Americans are employed by government than ever before, a growth helped by a boom in jobs at prisons and jails, a Census Bureau report showed. "Corrections is the fastest-growing segment" of government employment, said Meredith De Hart, a social science analyst at the Census Bureau. Employment of federal, state and local governments totaled a record 17.3 million people as of October, 1987, the most recent period for which statistics are available, the bureau reported. But while that represented an increase of 2.1% from 1986, employment in corrections jumped 9.5% to 425,000, the report said.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2005 | From Reuters
The U.S. Department of Justice released its first statistical report on prison rape and abuse Sunday, but acknowledged that much sexual violence in prisons was probably never reported. In a report required by the 2003 Prison Rape Elimination Act, the Justice Department's statistical arm measured sexual violence reported to prison authorities last year. The report said there were an estimated 8,210 incidents in the nation's prisons and jails, which hold about 2.1 million inmates.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Young people are being held for long periods of time in solitary confinement in prisons and jails, a practice that should be eliminated, two advocacy groups said Wednesday. A report released by the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch found that those younger than 18 are being held in solitary confinement for weeks or months at a time, especially teenagers who are lodged in adult facilities. The isolation “causes anguish, provokes serious mental and physical health problems, and works against rehabilitation for teenagers,” the report found.
OPINION
May 23, 2007
Re "L.A. gang members go union," May 21 Thank you for your article about former gang members finding solid employment and positive direction in their lives through work in construction. I believe that the vast majority of gang-associated youth would take advantage of the opportunity to learn job skills and work for a decent wage if that opportunity existed. Instead of creating those opportunities, we throw vast sums of money at suppression and incarceration, while our prisons and jails are breeding grounds for more gang violence.
OPINION
August 23, 2012
Re "Prison inmate caught in legal limbo," Aug. 21 After more than 30 years working as an attorney and a judge, I believed that nothing that occurred in the various court systems could shock me. However, I was both shocked and outraged to read of Daniel Larsen's continued incarceration two years after he had been found, by a court of competent jurisdiction, to have been wrongly convicted of a crime. Larsen remains in prison because California Atty. Gen.Kamala D. Harrishas determined that Larsen's violation of a procedural rule is more important than this innocent man's freedom.
OPINION
July 7, 2002
Re "O.C. Jail Officials Accused of Abuses," June 27: I must disagree with attorney Richard Herman. I have been a Newport Beach reserve police officer for 29 years. One of my duties is to deliver prisoners from the Newport Beach City Jail to Orange County Jail. During this time, I have seen Orange County Jail develop into a thoroughly modern facility, reflecting the directives of state and federal overseers of prisons and jails, concerned about the well-being of its inmates, and, above all, the safety of its deputies and inmates.
OPINION
August 23, 2012
Re "Prison inmate caught in legal limbo," Aug. 21 After more than 30 years working as an attorney and a judge, I believed that nothing that occurred in the various court systems could shock me. However, I was both shocked and outraged to read of Daniel Larsen's continued incarceration two years after he had been found, by a court of competent jurisdiction, to have been wrongly convicted of a crime. Larsen remains in prison because California Atty. Gen.Kamala D. Harrishas determined that Larsen's violation of a procedural rule is more important than this innocent man's freedom.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Responding to criticism of secrecy within the immigration detention system, federal officials launched an online service Friday to help relatives and attorneys find detainees in the sprawling networks of prisons and jails. In the past, locating a relative was cumbersome, time-consuming and sometimes impossible, requiring numerous phone calls to detention centers around the nation. The public, Internet-based tool is designed to fix that, said Phyllis Coven, acting director of detention policy and planning for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
OPINION
May 23, 2007
Re "L.A. gang members go union," May 21 Thank you for your article about former gang members finding solid employment and positive direction in their lives through work in construction. I believe that the vast majority of gang-associated youth would take advantage of the opportunity to learn job skills and work for a decent wage if that opportunity existed. Instead of creating those opportunities, we throw vast sums of money at suppression and incarceration, while our prisons and jails are breeding grounds for more gang violence.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2005 | From Reuters
The U.S. Department of Justice released its first statistical report on prison rape and abuse Sunday, but acknowledged that much sexual violence in prisons was probably never reported. In a report required by the 2003 Prison Rape Elimination Act, the Justice Department's statistical arm measured sexual violence reported to prison authorities last year. The report said there were an estimated 8,210 incidents in the nation's prisons and jails, which hold about 2.1 million inmates.
OPINION
July 7, 2002
Re "O.C. Jail Officials Accused of Abuses," June 27: I must disagree with attorney Richard Herman. I have been a Newport Beach reserve police officer for 29 years. One of my duties is to deliver prisoners from the Newport Beach City Jail to Orange County Jail. During this time, I have seen Orange County Jail develop into a thoroughly modern facility, reflecting the directives of state and federal overseers of prisons and jails, concerned about the well-being of its inmates, and, above all, the safety of its deputies and inmates.
OPINION
June 3, 2002
Re "Shield the Sick, and Society," editorial, May 28: Congratulations to The Times for supporting AB 1321. As the former supervising judge of the Mental Health Department of the Superior Court and as a judge who heard countless criminal matters involving untreated persons with severe mental illness, I applaud The Times for its support of AB 1421. As your editorial noted, various civil liberties proponents and others have taken an ideological approach that blinds itself to the reality that persons with untreated, persistent mental illness are themselves the victims of our current laws: They wander the streets hungry, homeless and without hope, cycle through our hospitals and are released with no after-care or plan to meet their human needs--and wind up in our prisons and jails not because they are criminals but because there simply is no place for them in our society.
OPINION
June 3, 2002
Re "Shield the Sick, and Society," editorial, May 28: Congratulations to The Times for supporting AB 1321. As the former supervising judge of the Mental Health Department of the Superior Court and as a judge who heard countless criminal matters involving untreated persons with severe mental illness, I applaud The Times for its support of AB 1421. As your editorial noted, various civil liberties proponents and others have taken an ideological approach that blinds itself to the reality that persons with untreated, persistent mental illness are themselves the victims of our current laws: They wander the streets hungry, homeless and without hope, cycle through our hospitals and are released with no after-care or plan to meet their human needs--and wind up in our prisons and jails not because they are criminals but because there simply is no place for them in our society.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the hush of a late summer night, America's war on drugs came speeding around 5th Street onto Jefferson, a poor, used-up part of the city where cocaine is like a hearth that people huddle around. The squad car was driven by a cop the local kids call Rat Boy. Two men were standing on the sidewalk, and they did not see him at first. This was careless. One of them had 5.18 grams of coke stashed in his left rear pants pocket.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the hush of a late summer night, America's war on drugs came speeding around 5th Street onto Jefferson, a poor, used-up part of the city where cocaine is like a hearth that people huddle around. The squad car was driven by a cop the local kids call Rat Boy. Two men were standing on the sidewalk, and they did not see him at first. This was careless. One of them had 5.18 grams of coke stashed in his left rear pants pocket.
NEWS
April 21, 1989
More Americans are employed by government than ever before, a growth helped by a boom in jobs at prisons and jails, a Census Bureau report showed. "Corrections is the fastest-growing segment" of government employment, said Meredith De Hart, a social science analyst at the Census Bureau. Employment of federal, state and local governments totaled a record 17.3 million people as of October, 1987, the most recent period for which statistics are available, the bureau reported. But while that represented an increase of 2.1% from 1986, employment in corrections jumped 9.5% to 425,000, the report said.
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