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Prisons Northern California

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NEWS
July 30, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's most famous "country club prison," once the domain of such celebrity felons as inside trader Ivan Boesky and Watergate figure H.R. Haldeman, is shutting down. The Lompoc Federal Prison Camp is being converted into a higher security federal prison. A prison with fences and razor wire instead of small "off-limits" signs around the property. A prison where inmates have to wear khaki uniforms instead of shorts and T-shirts. A prison where inmates can't play tennis in the afternoon.
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NEWS
June 1, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY and VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In much of California, economic development means luring the latest Internet start-up or building a pedestrian mall. But such paths to prosperity have largely evaded two rural communities that are poised to stake their economic futures on a less obvious growth opportunity: housing the state's sexually violent predators.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
Convicted junk bond financier Michael Milken will serve his sentence at a minimum-security prison in the San Francisco Bay Area, court documents show. Milken, the subject of one of the most intense white-collar criminal prosecutions in history, has been assigned to a prison camp at the Federal Correctional Institution in Pleasanton, on a military base. It's about 30 miles from where Milken attended college in Berkeley. Milken is to report to federal custody March 4.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soft whirring of push lawn mowers wafted across the recreation yard at Pelican Bay State Prison here Monday. In the middle of the fenced yard, two uniformed officers wielding a metal detector and shovel carefully searched for paper clips, nails or rusty razor blades that could be turned into weapons by inmates. "Corrections is 90% boredom and 10% sheer terror," said an officer at the maximum-security facility lined with gun towers and electrified fences.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Junk bond king Michael Milken spent his first full day in prison Monday, rising early on a rainy day and being led through a daylong orientation before receiving a work assignment. Milken reported to the Federal Prison Work Camp at Pleasanton after dinner on Sunday, a day before the court-imposed deadline for him to present himself at the front gate of the minimum security facility, Associate Warden Monica Wetzel said. As first days go, Milken's was uneventful, she said.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled near a towering redwood forest and the crystalline Smith River sits an imposing monolith of concrete and barbed wire that has become both savior and bane to this tiny North Coast town. When it opened about a decade ago, the maximum-security Pelican Bay State Prison seemed a clearing in the economic fog that loomed over remote Del Norte County as fishing and logging jobs in California's northwest corner began to vanish. And it was, quickly becoming the county's biggest employer.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | Associated Press
A wealthy Canadian businessman charged with hashish smuggling offered to pay for private guards and have his phone calls monitored if he could await trial in a downtown penthouse instead of a crowded jail cell. Michael Medjuck, 41, faces 20 years to life in prison if convicted of conspiring to smuggle 70 tons of hashish into the United States. He is now in the Oakland city jail, held without bail with seven other inmates.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities at remote Pelican Bay State Prison--considered the state's most secure correctional institution--are altering cell-door locks because two maximum-security inmates managed to manipulate the locks and leave their cells. A prison spokesman said the changes stem from separate incidents in which the locking mechanisms of the heavy steel doors were tampered with and the doors forced open. Neither of the inmates escaped from the prison, near Crescent City, just south of the Oregon border.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge, deploring "the senseless suffering and sometimes wretched misery" of inmates in notorious Pelican Bay Prison, ordered the state Wednesday to discontinue what he called a pattern of brutality and neglect at what was supposed to have been a national model for high-tech security. The landmark ruling here by District Judge Thelton E.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | Associated Press
A mysterious odor sent 16 people to hospitals on Wednesday and twice forced the evacuation of hundreds of inmates from cells at the Santa Clara County Jail. The source of the apparent gas leak could not be located. "It's a mystery, but we determined that whatever it was was not explosive or toxic," said Fire Capt. Dave Moore. Eight city employees were treated for nausea at nearby hospitals in the first incident, which took place around 9 a.m., police said.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled near a towering redwood forest and the crystalline Smith River sits an imposing monolith of concrete and barbed wire that has become both savior and bane to this tiny North Coast town. When it opened about a decade ago, the maximum-security Pelican Bay State Prison seemed a clearing in the economic fog that loomed over remote Del Norte County as fishing and logging jobs in California's northwest corner began to vanish. And it was, quickly becoming the county's biggest employer.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For seven years, the state of California turned a blind eye to the deadliest prison in America, where 50 inmates were wounded or shot dead by guards. Gov. Pete Wilson and the man who wants to succeed him, Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren, finally launched an examination of Corcoran State Prison that ended last year. The result was a whitewash--a pair of investigations that never probed any of the seven deaths or the other serious shootings, The Times has found.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | Associated Press
A private prison operator will build a $50-million federal detention facility for illegal immigrants, creating 400 new jobs in this small San Joaquin Valley town, a city official said Monday. Corrections Corp. of America is a Nashville, Tenn.-based company that has built state and federal prisons across the United States, Mayor Robert Silva said. "It's great. It's something we've been working for quite a while," Silva said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After serving two years of a 33-month prison sentence for racketeering, former Glendale Assemblyman Pat Nolan has been transferred to a halfway house in Sacramento as a first step toward his release from custody, officials said Friday. Nolan was moved to Sacramento from the Geiger Corrections Center in Spokane, Wash., and is scheduled to be released Aug. 27.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge, deploring "the senseless suffering and sometimes wretched misery" of inmates in notorious Pelican Bay Prison, ordered the state Wednesday to discontinue what he called a pattern of brutality and neglect at what was supposed to have been a national model for high-tech security. The landmark ruling here by District Judge Thelton E.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | PETER H. KING
Letters to the editor of the Siskiyou County Daily News have been quite lively of late. For example, in correspondence published last Tuesday, county resident Bendan Butler unloaded a series of rather breathless disclosures about opponents of a proposal to place a prison at the foot of Mt. Shasta. One anti-prison leader, Butler declared, "once claimed that she saw a flying saucer the size of Safeway land in Mt. Shasta." Another, he huffed, "used to be an attorney! No more need be said."
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For seven years, the state of California turned a blind eye to the deadliest prison in America, where 50 inmates were wounded or shot dead by guards. Gov. Pete Wilson and the man who wants to succeed him, Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren, finally launched an examination of Corcoran State Prison that ended last year. The result was a whitewash--a pair of investigations that never probed any of the seven deaths or the other serious shootings, The Times has found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After serving two years of a 33-month prison sentence for racketeering, former Glendale Assemblyman Pat Nolan has been transferred to a halfway house in Sacramento as a first step toward his release from custody, officials said Friday. Nolan was moved to Sacramento from the Geiger Corrections Center in Spokane, Wash., and is scheduled to be released Aug. 27.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | Associated Press
A wealthy Canadian businessman charged with hashish smuggling offered to pay for private guards and have his phone calls monitored if he could await trial in a downtown penthouse instead of a crowded jail cell. Michael Medjuck, 41, faces 20 years to life in prison if convicted of conspiring to smuggle 70 tons of hashish into the United States. He is now in the Oakland city jail, held without bail with seven other inmates.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | Associated Press
A mysterious odor sent 16 people to hospitals on Wednesday and twice forced the evacuation of hundreds of inmates from cells at the Santa Clara County Jail. The source of the apparent gas leak could not be located. "It's a mystery, but we determined that whatever it was was not explosive or toxic," said Fire Capt. Dave Moore. Eight city employees were treated for nausea at nearby hospitals in the first incident, which took place around 9 a.m., police said.
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