Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPrisons Populations
IN THE NEWS

Prisons Populations

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
OPINION
August 18, 2009 | Jamie Fellner, Jamie Fellner is senior counsel for the U.S. program of Human Rights Watch.
On Aug. 4, a panel of three federal judges ordered California to reduce its prison population to address grossly deficient medical and mental healthcare systems behind bars. The ruling makes for harrowing reading. Because of massive overcrowding, the court noted, California's prisons have become perilous places where inmates and staff are at risk of disease, mental illness and death. Inmates face "incompetence, indifference, cruelty and neglect." Preventable deaths occur weekly.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Eric Bailey
Two weeks after federal judges ordered California to reduce its prison population, an arm of the Schwarzenegger administration is set to vote on increased funding to police anti-drug units, potentially putting even more offenders behind bars. An advisory board for the California Emergency Management Agency is expected to decide today whether to channel $33 million in federal money to narcotics task forces around the state that have proved particularly adept at apprehending drug criminals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders on Wednesday held together their plan to close California's $26.3-billion deficit by delaying until next month a vote on a controversial provision to reduce the amount of time that thousands of inmates spend in prison.
OPINION
February 22, 2009 | Sara Catania
Earlier this month, a panel of three federal judges issued a tentative ruling that California must reduce its state prison population by more than 55,000 to relieve intense overcrowding and poor medical and mental health care. If the order holds, the state will have to figure out how to release prisoners on a scale never before seen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
A panel of three federal judges, saying overcrowding in state prisons has deprived inmates of their right to adequate healthcare, tentatively ruled Monday that the state must reduce the population in those lockups by as many as 57,000 people. The judges issued the decision after a trial in two long-running cases brought by inmates to protest the state of medical and mental healthcare in the prisons. Although their order is not final, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Two federal judges charged with forcing changes to California's troubled, overcrowded prisons expressed doubt Wednesday that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger would turn the system around, and indicated a willingness to move toward capping the inmate population. Such a move could push California's correctional system -- the biggest in the nation -- to overhaul the way it sentences criminals or even, some say, trigger the early release of thousands of inmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2007 | Steve lopez
In the ongoing flap over prison overcrowding in California and what to do about it, little consideration has been given to inmates such as Stephan Lilly. I wrote about the Los Angeles man late last year, when his conviction on charges stemming from a scuffle with a security guard were counted as a third strike. Despite a years-long battle with schizophrenia, and the fact that one of the three strikes was a threat that involved no physical contact, Lilly got 25 to life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Five weeks after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency in California's jampacked prison system, inmates went to court Monday to limit new admissions until the population declines. In legal papers filed in Sacramento and San Francisco, lawyers for the convicts said only a population cap imposed by a federal court would remedy prison conditions that amount to unconstitutional cruel and unusual punishment.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Growing at a rate of about 900 inmates each week starting in mid-2003, by mid-2004 the nation's prisons and jails held 2.1 million people, or one in every 138 U.S. residents, the government reported. By June 30, there were 48,000 more inmates, or 2.3%, more than the year before, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. The total inmate population has hovered around 2 million for the last few years, reaching 2.1 million on June 30, 2002, and just below that mark a year later.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2004 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The American criminal justice system relies too heavily on imprisoning people and needs to consider more effective alternatives, according to a study released Wednesday by the American Bar Assn., the nation's largest lawyers' organization. "For more than 20 years, we've gotten tougher on crime," said Dennis W. Archer, a former Detroit mayor and the group's current president. But it is unclear, he said, whether the U.S. is any safer for having 2.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|