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Prisons Virginia

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NEWS
March 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
Virginia's military-style boot camp for young felons is unconstitutional because women are not allowed to participate, a federal magistrate ruled Tuesday. Glen E. Conrad ruled in favor of Jennifer West, 23, who challenged the program after spending 357 days in prison for possessing cocaine with intent to sell. If West had been sent to the boot camp, she would have been released on probation in three months. "We're happy with the ruling," said West's attorney, Deborah Wyatt.
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NEWS
November 26, 1995 | DAVID WILKISON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The most dangerous weapon they're packing these days at the West Virginia Penitentiary in Moundsville is a 35 mm. Camera, that is. Hallways once walked by the state's most hardened criminals are being reopened to tourists, and Moundsville city officials hope the short-timers will give a lift to an economy that was hurt when the prison's less-desirable visitors moved out. "We feel it's our future," said Phil Remke, chairman of the Moundsville Economic Development Council.
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NEWS
January 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Fires erupted Friday night in buildings at a prison south of Washington, and authorities said an unknown number of inmates were free within the sprawling complex. The fires at the Lorton Reformatory, about 20 miles south of the District of Columbia, appeared to be deliberately set, officials said. The medium-security complex houses inmates from the district and has been the scene of numerous inmate protests because of overcrowded conditions.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | KAREN HAYWOOD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Giving a prison inmate a knife is usually not a good idea, but William E. (Dad) Smith does it all the time. He hands them eggbeaters, frying pans, measuring cups, eggs, butter and flour, too. Smith, the White House chef to former Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower, has transformed a cafeteria-style food preparation course at the District of Columbia's prison in suburban Virginia into a classroom for haute cuisine.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1989
The Virginia Department of Corrections awarded Fluor Daniel Inc. a construction management contract worth $37 million. The subsidiary of Fluor Corp. will direct the erection of a 516-cell prison in Buchanan, Va. Construction began in December and is scheduled for completion early next year.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | DAVID WILKISON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The most dangerous weapon they're packing these days at the West Virginia Penitentiary in Moundsville is a 35 mm. Camera, that is. Hallways once walked by the state's most hardened criminals are being reopened to tourists, and Moundsville city officials hope the short-timers will give a lift to an economy that was hurt when the prison's less-desirable visitors moved out. "We feel it's our future," said Phil Remke, chairman of the Moundsville Economic Development Council.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | KAREN HAYWOOD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Giving a prison inmate a knife is usually not a good idea, but William E. (Dad) Smith does it all the time. He hands them eggbeaters, frying pans, measuring cups, eggs, butter and flour, too. Smith, the White House chef to former Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower, has transformed a cafeteria-style food preparation course at the District of Columbia's prison in suburban Virginia into a classroom for haute cuisine.
OPINION
September 20, 1998
Kudos to The Times for its commitment to reading instruction and literacy ("A Long Road Back From Reading Crisis" and editorial, Sept. 13). It has been lonely teaching reading in high school these past 20 years. I missed your voice when I saw the elementary districts eliminate reading specialists to save money. And it was a rough battle when the state tried to make reading instruction literature-based. I am expected to teach twice as many students per hour as when I started. My first years, I had 15 students in a reading class and could tutor each one individually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Aiming to end a court-imposed moratorium on capital punishment in California, the Schwarzenegger administration Tuesday proposed new procedures to execute inmates by lethal injection, saying the changes "will result in the dignified end of life" for condemned inmates. The state, in papers submitted in response to a court challenge to lethal injection, said officials would stick to the three-drug protocol that has been blamed for excruciatingly painful deaths of inmates nationwide.
BOOKS
January 4, 2004 | Bruce Pandolfini, Bruce Pandolfini is the author of "Kasparov and Deep Blue" and "Every Move Must Have a Purpose." He was the real-life inspiration for the chess instructor in "Searching for Bobby Fischer."
The jacket of J.C. Hallman's "The Chess Artist: Genius, Obsession, and the World's Oldest Game" suggests that readers can anticipate a work in the tradition of Simon Winchester's "The Professor and the Madman" on the making of the Oxford English Dictionary. We should expect, it seems, an erudite excursion into the history and making of a cultural treasure. Surely chess, like the OED, has been a boon to civilization.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
Virginia's military-style boot camp for young felons is unconstitutional because women are not allowed to participate, a federal magistrate ruled Tuesday. Glen E. Conrad ruled in favor of Jennifer West, 23, who challenged the program after spending 357 days in prison for possessing cocaine with intent to sell. If West had been sent to the boot camp, she would have been released on probation in three months. "We're happy with the ruling," said West's attorney, Deborah Wyatt.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1989
The Virginia Department of Corrections awarded Fluor Daniel Inc. a construction management contract worth $37 million. The subsidiary of Fluor Corp. will direct the erection of a 516-cell prison in Buchanan, Va. Construction began in December and is scheduled for completion early next year.
NEWS
January 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Fires erupted Friday night in buildings at a prison south of Washington, and authorities said an unknown number of inmates were free within the sprawling complex. The fires at the Lorton Reformatory, about 20 miles south of the District of Columbia, appeared to be deliberately set, officials said. The medium-security complex houses inmates from the district and has been the scene of numerous inmate protests because of overcrowded conditions.
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