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Privacy Policy

BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Europe's biggest data protection authorities say they are taking steps to press Google Inc. to comply with European Union privacy rules and could impose fines if the Internet giant fails to do so. France's CNIL data protection agency said that authorities from France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands are frustrated with Google for not fixing what they say are flaws in its privacy policy. The move comes after a probe led by CNIL that concluded that Google had not given users enough information about how their personal information was being used across its various services.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, This story has been updated, as indicated below.
California Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris this week began putting top mobile app makers on notice that they will be held accountable for how they handle Californians' personal information. The state's top cop has sent out notices to 100 mobile apps that don't have a written privacy policy posted on their mobile apps that explains what information the app collects and shares. Harris initially targeted the most popular mobile apps, among them Open Table and apps for Delta and United Airlines.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
When protecting kids from online predators, you shouldn't worry only about pedophiles, pornographers, creeps and criminals. You also need to protect children against legitimate businesses that are out to invade kids' privacy. One way they do this is by getting them to disclose information that might be used to manipulate them in the marketplace.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2008 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. and privacy advocates are in a fight over valuable real estate: google.com. Several top consumer groups wrote an open letter to the Web search leader Tuesday, accusing it of violating a California law by failing to link to its privacy policy from google.com. Google's response: "We share the view that privacy information should be easy to find, and we believe our privacy policy is readily accessible to our users."
BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Privacy, schmivacy -- though not entirely without jitters. Google still reigns supreme as the go-to search engine, even if people are bit nervous about how it collects data and targets ads. A survey from Pew Internet & American Life Project found that 83% of people who use search engines in the U.S. prefer Google, up from 47% in 2004. Yahoo came in second at 6%. Nine in 10 Americans who use search engines say they find the information they are seeking and nearly as many say they learn something new or important that increased their knowledge.
HOME & GARDEN
December 9, 2004 | Steven Barrie-Anthony
Wouldn't it be nice if somebody would do your holiday shopping for you? That's the idea behind My Personal Shopper (www.personalshopper.com), a new computer program that does just that. Download and install the free software, fill out a form for each gift recipient -- name, birthday and what kind of gifts he or she likes (say, favorite authors or clothing designers). Enter your budget, and the program scours the Web and returns the best deals to your desktop.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2001 | Associated Press
Amazon.com Inc. and its Alexa Internet unit probably deceived consumers when its Internet software secretly passed on personal information to the company, the Federal Trade Commission said. But the FTC said it will not take any action against the online bookseller because one of the software programs in question--the comparison shopping service ZBubbles--no longer is operational and Alexa has changed its stated privacy policy.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Bank of America Corp. agreed to pay $14 million to resolve claims that it improperly disclosed customer information to marketers and third parties without permission. The bank will pay $10.75 million to 35 million checking and savings customers nationwide and to credit card customers in California and $3.25 million to finance privacy projects, said Shirley Norton, a spokeswoman for the bank. BofA did not admit wrongdoing in the accord.
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