Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPrivacy Policy
IN THE NEWS

Privacy Policy

NATIONAL
March 20, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As federal authorities accelerate plans to license thousands of surveillance drones over U.S. soil by late 2015, some legal experts and lawmakers are warning that unmanned aircraft could threaten privacy on an unparalleled scale. An opening shot in an expected battle to limit use of domestic drones came Wednesday when 24 civil liberties and privacy organizations submitted a formal petition to U.S. Customs and Border Protection demanding that the agency stop flying 10 unarmed Predator drones along the Mexican and Canadian borders until clear guidelines are established.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Europe's biggest data protection authorities say they are taking steps to press Google Inc. to comply with European Union privacy rules and could impose fines if the Internet giant fails to do so. France's CNIL data protection agency said that authorities from France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands are frustrated with Google for not fixing what they say are flaws in its privacy policy. The move comes after a probe led by CNIL that concluded that Google had not given users enough information about how their personal information was being used across its various services.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, This story has been updated, as indicated below.
California Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris this week began putting top mobile app makers on notice that they will be held accountable for how they handle Californians' personal information. The state's top cop has sent out notices to 100 mobile apps that don't have a written privacy policy posted on their mobile apps that explains what information the app collects and shares. Harris initially targeted the most popular mobile apps, among them Open Table and apps for Delta and United Airlines.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Mark Zuckerberg's sister, Randi, got stymied by Facebook's privacy policy this week when a photo she posted for her friends was shared publicly over Twitter. Twitter user @cshweitz shared a photo of the Zuckerberg family checking out Poke , the latest mobile app developed by Facebook, early Wednesday. The picture had originally been posted on Facebook by Randi Zuckerberg, who expressed her displeasure with the photo being shared publicly on Twitter. QUIZ: How much do you know about Facebook?
BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Privacy, schmivacy -- though not entirely without jitters. Google still reigns supreme as the go-to search engine, even if people are bit nervous about how it collects data and targets ads. A survey from Pew Internet & American Life Project found that 83% of people who use search engines in the U.S. prefer Google, up from 47% in 2004. Yahoo came in second at 6%. Nine in 10 Americans who use search engines say they find the information they are seeking and nearly as many say they learn something new or important that increased their knowledge.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007 | DAVID LAZARUS
The all-you-can-eat packages of voice, video and Internet services offered by phone and cable companies may be convenient, but they represent a potentially significant threat to people's privacy. Take, for example, Time Warner Cable, which has about 2 million customers in Southern California. The company offers a voice-video-Net package called "All the Best" for $89.85 for the first 12 months.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
When protecting kids from online predators, you shouldn't worry only about pedophiles, pornographers, creeps and criminals. You also need to protect children against legitimate businesses that are out to invade kids' privacy. One way they do this is by getting them to disclose information that might be used to manipulate them in the marketplace.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
As the spotlight is more prominently focused on the clouds, such as Google Drive, the era of being able to mindlessly click "OK" or "Agree" is over. When your stuff is stored on your computer at home, you alone are responsible for keeping it safe, secure and backed up. Your roof, your rules. But when you shift from local storage to remote, you live by terms set by someone else -- and it's best to read them. This is true for any cloud service, not just with Google. First, there are two sets of word-dense documents you need to read before marrying yourself to a cloud-service: the privacy policy and the terms of service.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|