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Privacy Policy

February 12, 2012 | By James Rainey
Traditional media outlets “have had little success” getting advertisers to move from their legacy businesses to their online news sites and relatively few of the ads they create for the Web are targeted to customers based on their interests, according to a new study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism. The struggle of traditional news organizations to adapt to the online world “throws into question the financial future of journalism as audiences continue to migrate online,” according to the group, an arm of the Pew Research Center.
September 12, 2007 | DAVID LAZARUS
The all-you-can-eat packages of voice, video and Internet services offered by phone and cable companies may be convenient, but they represent a potentially significant threat to people's privacy. Take, for example, Time Warner Cable, which has about 2 million customers in Southern California. The company offers a voice-video-Net package called "All the Best" for $89.85 for the first 12 months.
May 29, 2000
William Kennard, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, believes there are "powerful market incentives" for online companies to develop strong policies on Internet privacy. That would seem logical, considering the obvious concerns of Web companies' customers about online privacy. Yet, perversely, self-regulation has been a huge disappointment.
September 17, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- A coalition of more than 20 public health, youth and consumer groups that advocate for the health and welfare of teens are raising concerns about the potential negative effects of proposed changes to Facebook's privacy policy and are calling on the Federal Trade Commission to block the changes. The American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Collaboration for Youth, Pediatrics Now and Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity are among those groups objecting to new language under which parents or legal guardians would automatically give their permission for Facebook to use the name, image and personal information of teens in advertisements on the service.
August 27, 2010 | David Lazarus
You've probably heard it a thousand times: There's no free lunch. But sometimes it helps to get a little reminder. And so we turn our attention to e-mails making the rounds from something called BestShoppingRewards. The company has a variety of come-ons, all basically structured the same. The e-mail I'm looking at says, "Vote for your favorite item at McDonald's and get a FREE $50 McDonald's Gift Card!" When I visited the BestShoppingRewards website the other day, the pitch was for a "FREE $500 Visa Gift Card!"
July 5, 2008 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has made peace with privacy advocates over one of its policies, and it did so without cluttering up its famously sparse home page. The Web search giant had drawn criticism for its refusal to include a link to its privacy policy on Some groups called that a violation of state law. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company responded that it didn't think the link was necessary because its privacy policy was "readily accessible" to those looking for it. It can be found, among other places, on its About page, which is linked to Google.
February 15, 2012 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. said that to help users find friends also using the service, it retrieves entire address book from users' smartphones, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months. After questions about the practice, the company said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being stored. Twitter's privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that the company downloads and stores user address books. The policy does say that Twitter users "may customize your account with information such as … your address book so that we can help you find Twitter users you know.
September 1, 2000 | From Bloomberg News Inc., the biggest Internet retailer, said it revised its privacy policy and will be informing its 23 million customers of the changes via e-mail. The move comes amid concern by government regulators and consumer groups about protecting the privacy of Internet users. also faces several class-action lawsuits that allege its Alexa software unit secretly intercepted personal data and transmitted the information to and other parties.
March 8, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER, a popular political Web site that folded last month, is trying to raise cash by auctioning its consumer database, including the e-mail addresses, party affiliations and political interests of about 170,000 subscribers. The defunct Internet site is the latest to raise privacy hackles by peddling data about its users. A similar move last year by bankrupt prompted a lawsuit by the Federal Trade Commission.
October 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Eight major Web companies announced a multimillion-dollar online privacy initiative Wednesday aimed at heading off legislation in Congress. Microsoft, Excite, Lycos, Infoseek, Snap, Netscape, Yahoo and America Online unveiled the Privacy Partnership effort at the sixth annual Internet World convention in New York.
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