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Privacy Policy

BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By Shan Li
Fewer people are living in middle class neighborhoods in America as people increasingly dwell in areas segregated by income extremes. American families are moving to areas that are focused more exclusively on either the wealthy or the poor, a trend that could exacerbate the growing income divide, according to a study by professors at Cornell University and Stanford University. The study called this trend "income segregation. " MOST DANGEROUS JOBS: 10 professions with the highest fatalities in America Compared with 1970, when 65% of American families lived in middle income areas, only about 42% of families lived in those areas in 2009, the study concluded.
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HOME & GARDEN
December 9, 2004 | Steven Barrie-Anthony
Wouldn't it be nice if somebody would do your holiday shopping for you? That's the idea behind My Personal Shopper (www.personalshopper.com), a new computer program that does just that. Download and install the free software, fill out a form for each gift recipient -- name, birthday and what kind of gifts he or she likes (say, favorite authors or clothing designers). Enter your budget, and the program scours the Web and returns the best deals to your desktop.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2001 | Associated Press
Amazon.com Inc. and its Alexa Internet unit probably deceived consumers when its Internet software secretly passed on personal information to the company, the Federal Trade Commission said. But the FTC said it will not take any action against the online bookseller because one of the software programs in question--the comparison shopping service ZBubbles--no longer is operational and Alexa has changed its stated privacy policy.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Bank of America Corp. agreed to pay $14 million to resolve claims that it improperly disclosed customer information to marketers and third parties without permission. The bank will pay $10.75 million to 35 million checking and savings customers nationwide and to credit card customers in California and $3.25 million to finance privacy projects, said Shirley Norton, a spokeswoman for the bank. BofA did not admit wrongdoing in the accord.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By James Rainey
Traditional media outlets “have had little success” getting advertisers to move from their legacy businesses to their online news sites and relatively few of the ads they create for the Web are targeted to customers based on their interests, according to a new study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism. The struggle of traditional news organizations to adapt to the online world “throws into question the financial future of journalism as audiences continue to migrate online,” according to the group, an arm of the Pew Research Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2000
William Kennard, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, believes there are "powerful market incentives" for online companies to develop strong policies on Internet privacy. That would seem logical, considering the obvious concerns of Web companies' customers about online privacy. Yet, perversely, self-regulation has been a huge disappointment.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2008 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has made peace with privacy advocates over one of its policies, and it did so without cluttering up its famously sparse home page. The Web search giant had drawn criticism for its refusal to include a link to its privacy policy on Google.com. Some groups called that a violation of state law. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company responded that it didn't think the link was necessary because its privacy policy was "readily accessible" to those looking for it. It can be found, among other places, on its About page, which is linked to Google.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2012 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. said that to help users find friends also using the service, it retrieves entire address book from users' smartphones, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months. After questions about the practice, the company said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being stored. Twitter's privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that the company downloads and stores user address books. The policy does say that Twitter users "may customize your account with information such as … your address book so that we can help you find Twitter users you know.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Most cloud-service privacy policies address how they deal with your personal information and data about your usage, but less clear is whether they would tell you when and if law enforcement sought access to your files residing on their servers. As the virtual reality online storage wars gear up, many consumers and privacy advocates have expressed concern about the policies that will be applied to the content that they would be moving into remote servers. All of the services include a clause expressing that they will act in accordance with legal requests for data.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Amazon.com Inc., the biggest Internet retailer, said it revised its privacy policy and will be informing its 23 million customers of the changes via e-mail. The move comes amid concern by government regulators and consumer groups about protecting the privacy of Internet users. Amazon.com also faces several class-action lawsuits that allege its Alexa software unit secretly intercepted personal data and transmitted the information to Amazon.com and other parties.
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