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Privacy

NATIONAL
May 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times
Three Cleveland women rescued after they were abducted and held captive for about a decade thanked the public Sunday and asked for privacy. Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight issued statements that were read by a lawyer. "Thank you so much for everything you're doing and continue to do," Berry said. "I am so happy to be home with my family. " "I'm so happy to be home and want to thank everybody for all your prayers," Gina DeJesus said. "I just want time now to be with my family.
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BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1999 | Reuters
Privacy advocates are opposing Internet advertising firm DoubleClick Inc.'s proposed acquisition of consumer data collector Abacus Direct Corp., arguing that the merger would collect far too much personal information about consumers. The nonprofit Electronic Privacy Information Center and the privacy-oriented Web site Junkbusters said they are likely to ask regulators to block the deal if the companies proceed with the deal.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a victory for the health care industry, the Bush administration will at least temporarily delay sweeping new regulations proposed by former President Bill Clinton aimed at protecting the privacy of patients, officials said. One of Clinton's final directives before leaving office, the privacy rules were due to take effect Monday, with the goal of giving patients greater control over their medical records.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The lone Democrat on a White House privacy board has abruptly resigned, citing disagreements with the Bush administration over the board's role in protecting civil liberties. Lanny J. Davis, a Washington lawyer and former Clinton White House counsel, said this week he no longer believed the five-member board was sufficiently independent to provide oversight of government surveillance. Leaders of the Sept.
WORLD
February 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
President Nicolas Sarkozy married former model Carla Bruni at Elysee Palace, tying the knot less than three months after they reportedly first met. The couple said in a statement that they were married "in the presence of their families in the strictest privacy." Sarkozy, 53, told reporters in January that his relationship with the Italian-born heiress, 40, was serious but refused to reveal a wedding date. Sarkozy's approval ratings dropped during their courtship. Analysts said more traditional voters were put off by his jet-setting style.
OPINION
May 3, 2002
Re "AIDS Scare at Tiny College Shakes Town," April 30: Privacy laws prevented health officials from informing anyone of Nikko Briteramos' infection. Probably the same laws that enabled the partner who infected him. It's time our nation realizes that AIDS has never been a gay or race issue and takes action to prevent the unnecessary death sentences inflicted on these young adults. I hurt for the individuals, the families and friends of all infected, because it shouldn't have happened at all. Douglas O. McGoon III Claremont
BUSINESS
December 9, 1997 | Reuters
A group of leading technology manufacturers unveiled a voluntary code of conduct to protect the privacy of people who visit their Web sites. The Information Technology Industry Council said the list of eight principles was a response to President Clinton's call for the industry to protect privacy through self-regulation. The principles are also intended to give consumers "confidence and trust" that privacy rights will be respected when they engage in electronic commerce, he said.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, the Republican Congress quietly passed a law mandating that states use Social Security numbers on driver's licenses, hoping to make it harder for illegal immigrants to get jobs. Before the election, another Republican Congress froze funding to carry out that law--a step toward creating a national identification card, critics said--blaming the Clinton administration for trampling on personal privacy even though Republicans had introduced the legislation.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A panel on Internet names voted to conduct further studies on the databases containing names, phone numbers and other private information on domain-name owners, deferring questions over whether such details should remain public. The committee of the Marina del Rey-based Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, also rejected a proposal to give Internet users the ability to list third-party contacts rather than their own data in the open, searchable databases called Whois.
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