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BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Consumer Watchdog is looking to get a shot at challenging Google's $22.5-million settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over alleged privacy violations. A U.S. District Court judge gave the organization the ability to challenge the settlement over allegations it misled users of Apple's Safari browser. Google has denied any wrongdoing in the case. Now Consumer Watchdog is questioning whether the FTC can settle the case without an admission of wrongdoing. It is bolstering its argument by pointing to the lone dissent of FTC Commissioner J. Thomas Rosch, who criticized the settlement.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1999 | Reuters
Privacy advocates are opposing Internet advertising firm DoubleClick Inc.'s proposed acquisition of consumer data collector Abacus Direct Corp., arguing that the merger would collect far too much personal information about consumers. The nonprofit Electronic Privacy Information Center and the privacy-oriented Web site Junkbusters said they are likely to ask regulators to block the deal if the companies proceed with the deal.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Months before the futuristic glasses become publicly available, Google Glass is already getting scrutiny from Capitol Hill. Eight members of Congress on Thursday sent a letter to Google Chief Executive Larry Page to ask what his company will do to protect people's privacy. The letter landed on the second day of Google's annual conference for software developers, many of whom are already wearing an early version of Google Glass. Developers paid $1,500 a pair for the Explorer prototype and are learning how to write software for the wearable computing device.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a victory for the health care industry, the Bush administration will at least temporarily delay sweeping new regulations proposed by former President Bill Clinton aimed at protecting the privacy of patients, officials said. One of Clinton's final directives before leaving office, the privacy rules were due to take effect Monday, with the goal of giving patients greater control over their medical records.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Finally, instead of TMZ, is America saying TMI? Too much information about a celebrity? The NBC news accounts of Philip Seymour Hoffman's “secret diaries” - two volumes found in his apartment - are getting some surprising pushback. The Times' story on the NBC exclusive cites Twitter comments about the diaries - not their contents but NBC's revealing them - as “pretty tacky that anon police are offering news orgs Philip Seymour Hoffman's diary.” And so on: “simply nauseatingly intrusive” and “just despicable.” The Times' story itself attracted a comment in the same vein: “This is a ridiculous invasion of privacy ... he did not shoot up a school, murder his wife ... he killed himself, why do they need to know what's in his diary?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Sunset Strip bookie Charlie Katz suspected the feds had bugged his apartment, so he would amble over to a pay phone outside where Carney's hot dog joint now stands to call in his bets to Boston and Miami. It was 1965, a time when phone booths had four glass walls and a folding door, allowing Katz to seal himself off from eavesdroppers. Or so he thought. FBI agents planted a recording device at the booth and taped his dealings, leading to his conviction on eight illegal wagering charges.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The lone Democrat on a White House privacy board has abruptly resigned, citing disagreements with the Bush administration over the board's role in protecting civil liberties. Lanny J. Davis, a Washington lawyer and former Clinton White House counsel, said this week he no longer believed the five-member board was sufficiently independent to provide oversight of government surveillance. Leaders of the Sept.
WORLD
February 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
President Nicolas Sarkozy married former model Carla Bruni at Elysee Palace, tying the knot less than three months after they reportedly first met. The couple said in a statement that they were married "in the presence of their families in the strictest privacy." Sarkozy, 53, told reporters in January that his relationship with the Italian-born heiress, 40, was serious but refused to reveal a wedding date. Sarkozy's approval ratings dropped during their courtship. Analysts said more traditional voters were put off by his jet-setting style.
OPINION
May 3, 2002
Re "AIDS Scare at Tiny College Shakes Town," April 30: Privacy laws prevented health officials from informing anyone of Nikko Briteramos' infection. Probably the same laws that enabled the partner who infected him. It's time our nation realizes that AIDS has never been a gay or race issue and takes action to prevent the unnecessary death sentences inflicted on these young adults. I hurt for the individuals, the families and friends of all infected, because it shouldn't have happened at all. Douglas O. McGoon III Claremont
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