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BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Consumer Watchdog is looking to get a shot at challenging Google's $22.5-million settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over alleged privacy violations. A U.S. District Court judge gave the organization the ability to challenge the settlement over allegations it misled users of Apple's Safari browser. Google has denied any wrongdoing in the case. Now Consumer Watchdog is questioning whether the FTC can settle the case without an admission of wrongdoing. It is bolstering its argument by pointing to the lone dissent of FTC Commissioner J. Thomas Rosch, who criticized the settlement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton
The family of Lee Thompson Young is asking for privacy after the actor was found dead in his North Hollywood home Monday morning. Authorities responded to the home in the 5400 block of Tujunga Avenue shortly after 8 a.m. and discovered the body of the 29-year-old actor, LAPD spokeswoman Rosie Herrera said. The Los Angeles County coroner is investigating the death. A law enforcement source told The Times that the death was being investigated as a possible suicide.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1999 | GREG MILLER, technology reporter
The White House this week appointed an Ohio State University law professor to lead the administration's efforts in the increasingly thorny area of consumer privacy in the computer age. Peter Swire, regarded as a leading authority on privacy matters, was named chief counselor for privacy within the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees regulatory policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Sunset Strip bookie Charlie Katz suspected the feds had bugged his apartment, so he would amble over to a pay phone outside where Carney's hot dog joint now stands to call in his bets to Boston and Miami. It was 1965, a time when phone booths had four glass walls and a folding door, allowing Katz to seal himself off from eavesdroppers. Or so he thought. FBI agents planted a recording device at the booth and taped his dealings, leading to his conviction on eight illegal wagering charges.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2009 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court said Monday it would rule for the first time on whether employees had a right to privacy when they sent text messages on electronic devices supplied by their employers. The justices agreed to hear an appeal from the city of Ontario, which was successfully sued by police Sgt. Jeff Quon and three other officers after their text messages -- some of which were sexually explicit -- were read by the police chief. At issue is whether the chief violated their rights under the 4th Amendment, which forbids "unreasonable searches" by the government.
OPINION
May 19, 2003
Have you been to your doctor lately? Mine has asked me to read and sign a multi-page form detailing the privacy surrounding my medical records. It's presented to make it appear that our privacy is increasing, but a close read says that private medical information may now be released to law enforcement if it might help locate suspects and solve crimes. It used to be that the police needed a court order to look at your medical records. This is less privacy than before, not more. Can you spell "police state"?
BUSINESS
June 22, 1999 | Reuters
Privacy advocates are opposing Internet advertising firm DoubleClick Inc.'s proposed acquisition of consumer data collector Abacus Direct Corp., arguing that the merger would collect far too much personal information about consumers. The nonprofit Electronic Privacy Information Center and the privacy-oriented Web site Junkbusters said they are likely to ask regulators to block the deal if the companies proceed with the deal.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times
Three Cleveland women rescued after they were abducted and held captive for about a decade thanked the public Sunday and asked for privacy. Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight issued statements that were read by a lawyer. "Thank you so much for everything you're doing and continue to do," Berry said. "I am so happy to be home with my family. " "I'm so happy to be home and want to thank everybody for all your prayers," Gina DeJesus said. "I just want time now to be with my family.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a victory for the health care industry, the Bush administration will at least temporarily delay sweeping new regulations proposed by former President Bill Clinton aimed at protecting the privacy of patients, officials said. One of Clinton's final directives before leaving office, the privacy rules were due to take effect Monday, with the goal of giving patients greater control over their medical records.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The lone Democrat on a White House privacy board has abruptly resigned, citing disagreements with the Bush administration over the board's role in protecting civil liberties. Lanny J. Davis, a Washington lawyer and former Clinton White House counsel, said this week he no longer believed the five-member board was sufficiently independent to provide oversight of government surveillance. Leaders of the Sept.
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