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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Richard Winton
A private investigator who has worked for such high-profile criminal defendants as Michael Jackson and Winona Ryder pleaded no contest Tuesday to conspiracy to obstruct justice and bribery in connection with the payoff of an alleged rape victim. Bradley G. Miller entered the plea to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and three counts of bribing a witness, said Jane Robison, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. The plea came during a pretrial hearing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Bradley Zint and Jeremiah Dobruck
Orange County district attorney investigators have raided an Upland-based law firm accused of bullying civic leaders in Southern California in their aggressive representation of police and their unions. The search of Lackie, Dammeier, McGill & Ethir comes after the firm announced last month that it would be dissolving following a series of scandals and a lawsuit filed by a pair of Costa Mesa council members who alleged the firm was harassing them for political gain. The San Bernardino County Sentinel , which first reported the story, said that investigators left the law office carrying boxes of documents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY
The district attorney's office Monday announced the settlement of a consumer protection lawsuit it filed against a Westminster private detective whose agency assists victims of domestic violence. The district attorney's civil complaint alleged that William H. Holland misled prospective clients into thinking his services were free and then asked for donations, and falsely represented his business as a nonprofit organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By T.L. Stanley
TNT's new private eye drama "King & Maxwell" may share some thematic DNA with classic gumshoe series like "Moonlighting," "Remington Steele" and "The Rockford Files. " But don't call it retro, said executive producer Shane Brennan, who based the show on David Baldacci's bestselling novels. "You can't regurgitate what's been done before," said Brennan, who also created "NCIS: L.A. " "I wanted to revisit this genre that was a TV staple back in the '70s and '80s and look at it in a very fresh, modern way. " The result is a crime-solving drama, launching June 10, with Jon Tenney and Rebecca Romijn as former Secret Service agents running down bad guys in Washington, D.C. They have an insider's view of the country's halls of power and will sometimes be looking for villains in those very places.
NEWS
September 10, 1992
The City Council agreed Tuesday to hire a private detective to investigate the management of the city-owned Ramada Hotel. The 3-year-old hotel has been plagued for months with falling revenues, employee complaints and charges of unfair billing practices. Councilwoman Patricia A. Moore suggested that the hotel's records be seized immediately, but the council opted instead for a formal investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991
The family of a 12-year-old El Monte Boy Scout who disappeared on a hike in the San Bernardino Mountains last summer has hired a private detective to investigate the possibility that the youth was kidnaped. Detective Logan Clarke, who specializes in child abduction cases, said Monday that there were strong indications that Jared Negrete did not die in the San Gorgonio Wilderness, where hundreds of searchers concentrated their efforts for 16 days in July and August.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1985 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
NBC struck first with "Remington Steele," pairing a veteran private investigator with a novice of the opposite sex for mystery, fun and romance. CBS came up with a successful variation in "Scarecrow and Mrs. King." Now ABC is trying its hand at the formula with "Moonlighting," a new series debuting Sunday at 9 p.m. (Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1989 | Steve Emmons, Times Staff Writer
A private investigator because she "feared for her life," testified Wednesday that a deputy in Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates' intelligence unit assigned her to spy on one of Gates' election foes and report who attended the opponent's fund-raiser. The private investigator, Deanna Short, said the same deputy promised her a permit for a concealed weapon in exchange for information on another of Gates' political opponents. She quoted the deputy as saying that Gates "had personally approved it."
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a private detective, Eiko Yonezawa is smart and enterprising. Using one of a dozen personas, she can track down cheating husbands, dig up potentially embarrassing dirt on future brides and uncover the people behind the money in a hostile takeover. In recent years, however, she has found herself working on a new kind of assignment that is among the toughest she has encountered: clients asking to have themselves investigated.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Robert Lloyd, TELEVISION CRITIC
Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction, has turned his long short story "Bored to Death" into an HBO situation comedy, also titled, though less aptly, "Bored to Death." Each version revolves around a character named Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction who is having a hard time finishing his second novel and is drinking too much white wine -- which is his idea of drinking less alcohol -- and smoking too much pot. As the series opens, his girlfriend is moving out and -- sad, stymied and under the influence of a Raymond Chandler novel -- he goes onto Craigslist to advertise his services as a private detective: "I'm not licensed but maybe I'm someone who can help you."
BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
CAMDEN, N.J. - In an office in a sleepy town in southern New Jersey, Harry Glemser's phone rang. With no buxom secretary to take a message, he answered it himself. It was a dame, looking to hire a private eye. But this was no scene from a noir novel. The woman was calling because someone in a car kept lurking in her driveway, the engine running, when her husband wasn't home. She'd called the police, but they couldn't help. She hoped Glemser could. Detectives like Glemser across cash-strapped states have been getting more calls like these as cities and towns cut their police forces to contend with deep budget cuts.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Her holiday wish: family ,” Dec. 24 The story about Meredith Kensington's search for the three siblings she lost contact with many years ago after they entered Los Angeles County's foster care system broke my heart. I hope someone reads her story and helps her find them, as the system has failed her. It is sad when people are just objects and not living, caring individuals with feelings. The system failed my daughter and me. It took a private detective to find me after 45 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Matchmaker" is a surprise. It sounds like a throwback to an earlier, more traditional style of Israeli filmmaking but it instead provides a view of that country that's as satisfyingly eccentric and unexpected as anything we've seen. Written and directed by the veteran Avi Nesher, nominated for seven Israeli academy awards and winner of the lead actor and actress prize, "The Matchmaker" is set largely in 1968 and presents itself as the familiar coming-of-age story of a 16-year-old boy. But, as it turns out, the boy's story is only a part of a larger, more compelling dramatic mosaic and what he learns about the vagaries and perplexities of the human heart is only interesting because of the complex, unusual adults he learns it from.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The problem with "back-door pilots" — episodes of popular series written to introduce characters for a potential new show — is that they are invariably better than the front-door versions that follow. Exhibit A: "The Finder. " This spring, we met Walter Sherman (Geoff Stults), former military police officer turned private sleuth, when an episode of Fox's "Bones" took Booth (David Boreanaz) and Brennan (Emily Deschanel) into the Florida swamps. Faced with the inevitable half-rotted corpse, Booth turned to Sherman, an old Army buddy and decorated war hero who sustained the sort of gorgeously fictionalized brain damage that leaves a person with the near-miraculous ability to find anyone or anything any where, any time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
David Dutcher met Sharon on Match.com in late 2008, a few months after separating from his wife. "We had a lot in common," he recalled. Sharon loved four-wheel-drive trucks and sports. They met for coffee, then dinner. Sharon was tall, slender, blond and beautiful. She moaned that she had not had sex in a long time. She told him he had large, strong hands and wondered if that portended other things. She described his kisses as "yummy. " "It felt a lot like Christmas," said Dutcher, 49, a tall, burly engineer with wavy red hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If for no other reason than that you get to spend six hours with Jason Isaacs, I am going to recommend "Case Histories," the latest British import to take up residence under the banner of "Masterpiece Mystery" Sunday on PBS. It is not the only reason to recommend it, but it is by itself sufficient; indeed, it overwhelms any small arguments in its disfavor. Most people who know Isaacs' work will have seen him in a long blond wig as Lucius Malfoy in the Harry Potter movies — and that is many more people, certainly, than saw him in Showtime's great "Brotherhood" (2006-08)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former LAPD Deputy Chief Daniel R. Sullivan, once considered a top contender for the chief's job, pleaded no contest Friday to illegally possessing confidential law enforcement information as a private detective and was sentenced to a year's probation. He became the highest ranking former LAPD official sentenced on criminal charges since the corruption scandals of the early 1900s. Municipal Court Judge Veronica Simmons McBeth also fined Sullivan $4,995.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The farmer's wife is sleeping with his brother-in-law. The manager is having an affair with a co-worker. A rich husband has disappeared with a migrant laborer. A government official is vacationing with a call girl. Morality is running amok and somebody is watching, camera rolling, engine running. It's not Big Brother. It's Wei Wujun, private eye. The job may have become a stereotype in the West, but in Communist China it's still a novelty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Anne Francis, who costarred in the 1950s science-fiction classic "Forbidden Planet" and later played the title role in "Honey West," the mid-1960s TV series about a sexy female private detective with a pet ocelot, died Sunday. She was 80. Francis, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2007 and underwent surgery and chemotherapy, died of complications of pancreatic cancer at a retirement home in Santa Barbara, said Jane Uemura, her daughter. Friends and family members were with her, said a family spokeswoman, Melissa Fitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010 | By Brigitte Frase, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I've been following Sara Paretsky's private investigator, V.I. Warshawski, since her first case in 1982 when, in life as well as fiction, female P.I.s were a novelty. Or, I should say, I've been trying to keep up as V.I., known to her friends as Vic, races around Chicago in her little Mustang at all hours of the day and night. Victoria Iphigenia, daughter of an opera-loving Italian mother and a legendarily honest Chicago cop, is at once an over-grown, strutting, smart-mouthed tomboy and a sexy, emotionally vulnerable woman.
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