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Private Detectives

ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Thursday evening, viewers of "NBC Nightly News" got a familiar face they haven't seen much of in recent months. Ann Curry, the ousted former co-host of "Today," was the fill-in anchor for Brian Williams . Curry has been largely absent from TV screens since she was fired from her "Today" gig last summer. Though she chose to remain employed by NBC News after the ouster, she's only reported on a handful of stories. Though she was a regular fill-in anchor on "Nightly News" during her time on "Today," Thursday was the first time she's been there since her tearful "Today" departure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | AL MARTINEZ
Don Crutchfield is seated in an office surrounded by boxing pictures, talking about himself. It is something he does well, for even though he has the stocky build of a street fighter, it is accompanied by the smooth, persuasive delivery of a press agent. He is telling me he is private investigator to the stars and rattles off the names of celebrities like items on a grocery list: Sinatra, Brando, Lewis, Garland, Bronson, Rickles, pickles, bread, milk, salami. . . .
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"Never treat a war like a skirmish. Treat all skirmishes like wars." --L. Ron Hubbard The Church of Scientology does not turn the other cheek. Ministers mingle with private detectives. "Sacred scriptures" counsel the virtues of combativeness. Parishioners double as paralegals for litigious church attorneys. Consider the passage that a prominent Scientology minister selected from the religion's scriptures, authored by the late L.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
As the former prosecutors and ex-FBI agents at Kroll Associates see it, they are sort of the Rolls-Royce of private investigators. In a business sometimes sullied by questionable tactics and indiscretion, Kroll prides itself on keeping its hands clean and mouth shut while digging into the background and activities of a corporate raider, prospective business partner or errant executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by allegations of financial improprieties in the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency, interim administrator Jerry Scharlin said Wednesday he had hired a private detective firm to investigate agency operations. The private investigators' work has been turned over to the city controller's office, and helped spark a more detailed audit of agency land transactions now underway, Scharlin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
Tossing a legal hand grenade into an already-contentious case, celebrity sleuth Anthony Pellicano on Friday demanded and won the right to act as his own lawyer in his upcoming trial on wiretapping and racketeering charges. U.S. District Judge Dale S. Fischer tried to talk Pellicano out of his plan, but he would not relent. "I urge you to let me appoint counsel for you," Fischer implored in federal court in downtown Los Angeles. "You're very kind, your honor, but no, thank you," Pellicano said.
WORLD
March 13, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Police investigating Britain's phone hacking scandal swooped down on a number of homes in an early-morning raid Tuesday and arrested six people, including a woman widely identified as Rebekah Brooks, the former head of Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers. Scotland Yard said five men and the woman were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, a more serious charge than phone hacking. That suggests that the authorities' probe of the scandal has broadened to include an investigation of a possible coverup by employees and executives at Murdoch-owned News International.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They pick through trash, poke through mail and tap into sophisticated computer databases in search of the elusive money trail. When it comes to tracking down the soon-to-be ex-husband's secret nest egg, a business executive's embezzled loot or a fallen dictator's offshore bank accounts, private investigators employ methods both mundane and cutting-edge to find hidden assets. Some may rely on less scrupulous tactics. Or, as local gumshoe John J.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daniel R. Sullivan, a retired deputy police chief once considered one of the Los Angeles Police Department's brightest stars, was charged Thursday with illegally having confidential law enforcement information in the files of his private investigation company. He is the highest-ranking former LAPD official to face criminal charges since the corruption scandals of the early 1900s, a department spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Private investigator Arthur Michael Pascal, handcuffed to a wheelchair and nearly blind from diabetes, pleaded no contest Tuesday to voluntary manslaughter charges in the slaying of a Van Nuys prostitute accused of harassing one of his clients. Pascal, 56, entered his plea inside the courtroom of Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Charles Horan, bringing to an end a case that began almost nine years ago with the shooting death of June Mincher.
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