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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today, electricity is so inextricably woven into the fabric of our lives that we don't even think about it: We flick a switch and a light comes on - until, as millions in the Northeast discovered during Hurricane Sandy, it doesn't, and you learn that it can take days or even weeks to restore the complex electric grid inaugurated more than a hundred years ago. One of the many pleasures of "Age of Edison," Ernest Freeberg's engaging history of the spread...
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OPINION
December 17, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
When will the insurers revolt? It's a question that's popping up more and more. On the surface, the question answers itself. We're talking about pinstriped insurance company executives, not Hell's Angels. One doesn't want to paint with too broad a brush, but if you were going to guess which vocations lend themselves least to revolutionary zeal, the actuary sciences rank slightly behind embalmers. Still, it's hard not to wonder how much more these people are willing to take. Even an obedient dog will bite if you kick it enough.
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OPINION
January 28, 2002
I was shocked and disgusted but somehow not surprised by a detail of Kenneth Lay's compensation structure nearly buried at the end of the story of his resignation (Jan. 24). You reported that Lay had a credit line of $7.5 million from Enron, meaning he could borrow that much from the firm at any given time for his personal use. He took advantage of this arrangement multiple times last summer, and then would repay the loan with his Enron stock, only to take advantage of the credit line once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today, electricity is so inextricably woven into the fabric of our lives that we don't even think about it: We flick a switch and a light comes on - until, as millions in the Northeast discovered during Hurricane Sandy, it doesn't, and you learn that it can take days or even weeks to restore the complex electric grid inaugurated more than a hundred years ago. One of the many pleasures of "Age of Edison," Ernest Freeberg's engaging history of the spread...
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Abel G. Aganbegyan, a leading economist and key adviser to Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, has endorsed the idea of allowing private firms to provide a wide variety of consumer services. Aganbegyan, who appeared Wednesday at an officially sponsored meeting with reporters to discuss his economic thinking, was once considered unorthodox, but Gorbachev's plan for radical reform of the lagging Soviet economy have brought Aganbegyan and his associates into the mainstream.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2000 | Washington Post
China gave one of its strongest endorsements yet to private enterprise, saying that all obstacles to the development of the private sector should be eliminated. The influential State Development Planning Commission said that private enterprises should be put on an "equal footing with state-owned enterprises." In March, China characterized private enterprises as an "important component" of the economy.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Wednesday adopted a new law designed to encourage the growth of small private enterprise in the consumer sector for the first time since the 1920s. The new law provides a legal framework for individual and family-owned shops and services. It was adopted unanimously at the closing of session of the Supreme Soviet, the nominal parliament. An important feature of Soviet leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to solidify China's economic reforms, the legislature is preparing to amend the constitution to protect private enterprise and strengthen the rule of law. The amendments, to be ratified by the National People's Congress next month, also will enshrine the economic ideas of Deng Xiaoping alongside the ideologies of Marx, Lenin and Mao.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
For Yuri B., the idea of opening his own very small business--an auto repair shop--is very appealing. For him and millions of others, running an individual enterprise within the state-controlled Soviet economy will become possible next spring under a government decree designed to provide a private alternative to the heavily criticized state-run consumer sector.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | DENIS D. GRAY, Associated Press
Behind the moldering facades of Imperial Britain, in the steamy alleys of this exotic Asian capital, a vigorous black market as well as legitimate enterprises have survived one of Asia's most stifling economic systems. Rangoon is often described as a languid backwater caught in a time warp, a city best symbolized by Burmese idly smoking cheroots by the river and a clock on the Customs House that stopped at 20 minutes to midnight--more than a decade ago.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As chief technology officer for President Obama's reelection effort, Harper Reed oversaw the development of projects such as Narwhal, an intricate platform that linked the campaign's myriad databases and allowed officials to plot strategy with new precision. The heady and exhausting 19-month gig convinced Reed, former technology officer for the online T-shirt retailer Threadless, that he should launch his own venture. "When you go from building T-shirts to software for a presidential campaign used by a cast of millions, it's pretty easy to think, 'OK, we can build something pretty big,'" Reed said.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Budget discussions in Washington these days always seem to deteriorate into arguments over what government is supposed to do for its citizens, and what should be left aside. Is the reach of government strictly defined in the Constitution? Or tradition? And, if so, whose "tradition"? Here's a rule of thumb to consider for when government should take a role in providing a service: When it's cheaper. That doesn't mean cheaper merely in a narrow sense, such as cheaper at the cash register, or for some people rather than others.
WORLD
August 6, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
They began with a hose and a few rags when Amilcar Santa Cruz and his 30 siblings and cousins set up a carwash in Havana's Miramar district, a little family business to help make ends meet. And that's all it was for several years. But in the last few months, the business has exploded. The carwash today is a bustling piece of new Cuban enterprise, complete with metal roofing, fluorescent lighting, a cafe and a full line of air fresheners to hang from the rearview mirror. "Everyone here is real hardworking," Santa Cruz said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Beyond government budget jitters, there is a much bigger dynamic at play in the far-flung battle over public pensions. It goes beyond even anti-union hate, non-union envy and union gluttony. These are all key motivators in the pension tussle that has been brewing for years in Sacramento and the current all-out, anti-union attacks in Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and other states. But they're merely a symptom, it seems to me, of a gradually declining lifestyle for working stiff Americans ?
BUSINESS
November 6, 2010 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
Stock prices are at two-year highs and the U.S. job market is showing its strongest signs of life since spring. Yet many Americans may find it hard to feel elated about the sudden generous bump in their 401(k) accounts this fall. Even as the economy has brightened, Wall Street's latest burst of optimism has been driven in large part by bets on what will happen ? or won't happen ? in Washington. To that extent, going with the markets' giddy flow requires holding your nose. And that may not change soon.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | Malin Rising, Associated Press
Schools run by private enterprise? Free iPods and laptop computers to attract students? It may sound out of place in Sweden, that paragon of taxpayer-funded cradle-to-grave welfare. But a sweeping reform of the school system has survived the critics and 16 years later is spreading and attracting interest abroad. "I think most people, parents and children, appreciate the choice," said Bertil Ostberg from the Education Ministry. "You can decide what school you want to attend and that appeals to people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1989 | ROBERT J. SAMUELSON, Robert J. Samuelson writes on economic issues from Washington
I have never liked the term Reaganomics. It symbolizes what's wrong with our economic debates. Sloganeering substitutes for clear thinking. Reaganomics was a catchword of President Reagan's friends and foes alike to mean whatever they pleased. For both, it signified something new--either wonderful or terrifying. This was always hype. Reagan had no new theory. His economic success rested on an old truth: Private enterprise works.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | Associated Press
The Supreme Soviet today passed a law allowing citizens to earn extra money by privately providing some goods, such as makeup, and services, such as car repair, that are hard to obtain on the official market. The Tass press agency said the measure on "self-employment" will apply to virtually all Soviets. But adults who want to moonlight as taxi drivers, seamstresses or repairmen may do so only during their free time. Virtually all adult Soviet citizens are employed by the state.
WORLD
September 16, 2007 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
His polished shoes have bronze tips, a rich man's trinkets on a poor man's feet. The shoes glow as he lords it over a stretch of sidewalk where, after paying off cops and other officials who sidle up to him with a wink and a smirk, he can earn $5 a day parking cars beneath the palms near the mall. Moving quickly through the traffic, Mounir Essawy co-opts public space and turns it into a sliver of private enterprise.
NEWS
March 29, 2005 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
The bison is a cultural icon for Native Americans, who lived for centuries alongside the woolly beasts. But an 18-month contract that handed over responsibility for hundreds of Montana bison to nearby tribes on March 15 is anything but a return to tradition, say wildlife professionals who oppose it. Critics see the controversial deal between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Council, based in Pablo, Mont.
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