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June 7, 2009 | Lisa Girion
Some may find it hard to believe that the U.S. health insurance industry supports making major changes to the nation's healthcare system. The industry, after all, scuttled President Clinton's healthcare overhaul bid with ads featuring "Harry and Louise" fretting about change. But this time, it turns out, the health insurance industry has good reason to support at least some change: It needs it.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Maeve Reston
DURHAM, Ore. - Oregon officials will vote Friday on whether to become the first state to scrap its troubled insurance exchange and switch to the federal system, after spending an estimated $248 million on an ambitious exchange that failed in spectacular fashion. Not a single insurance seeker was able to enroll online in a private plan under the Affordable Care Act in this high-tech state, which has long prided itself on healthcare innovation and whose governor is a former emergency room doctor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1994 | FRANK MANNING
Concerned over a sharp increase in premiums for liability insurance, the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District has decided to cancel its contract with a public agency that is providing coverage. The district's board of directors voted this week to allow its staff to withdraw from its contract with the Sacramento-based Joint Powers Insurance Authority and sign with a private firm.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Polls have consistently shown that even though the public opposes Obamacare, people like some of its most significant provisions. That's particularly true of the requirement that insurers ignore preexisting conditions when signing up customers for coverage. Yet that one provision, also known as guaranteed issue, is responsible for trade-offs that people bitterly oppose. Here are two good illustrations of this dichotomy. In The Times on Monday, Soumya Karlamangla reported on the plight of some of those who aren't poor enough to qualify for Medi-Cal, the insurance program for Californians with incomes near the poverty line.
NEWS
September 6, 1986 | Associated Press
The Defense Department, departing from current policy, will begin billing private insurance companies on Oct. 1 for medical care that military hospitals give retirees and dependents, the Pentagon announced Friday. The change in billing practices, authorized by Congress early this year, will not result in any additional charges to retirees or dependents admitted to military hospitals, the Pentagon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1992
Measles, whooping cough and other illnesses that debilitate and even kill children should be things of the past. Instead they keep cropping up in epidemics, and it's no wonder. Only 42% of 2-year-olds in Los Angeles and only half in Orange County are fully immunized against childhood diseases. Obviously, additional efforts must be made to increase the numbers of children who are protected. One thing that would help would be for the Legislature to adopt--and Gov.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The repeal of the catastrophic care law will force millions of people to pay more for their supplemental medical insurance and impose a major new financial burden on state governments. Repeal will also bring bigger hospital bills to some of the sickest elderly, but provide substantial tax savings for senior citizens in higher income brackets.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2009 | Noam N. Levey and Peter Nicholas
In an effort to maintain control of the healthcare debate, President Obama on Tuesday ridiculed critics of his government-run insurance proposal, saying private insurers have nothing to fear if they are efficient and consumer-friendly. "If private insurers say that the marketplace provides the best-quality healthcare -- if they tell us that they're offering a good deal -- then why is it that the government, which they say can't run anything, suddenly is going to drive them out of business?"
NATIONAL
June 18, 2012 | By Noam N. Levey, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Trauma surgeons at MedStar Washington Hospital Center didn't know the name of the young man wheeled into the trauma center, unconscious and bleeding from his face and head after being hit by a car. Nor did they know he lacked insurance. But as they worked to save his life, doctors and nurses at the capital's largest hospital ran a dizzying battery of lab tests and high-tech scans. Surgeons operated repeatedly, at one point removing a portion of his skull to relieve pressure on the brain.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2012 | David Lazarus
We've been hearing - and will continue to hear - a lot about how Paul Ryan's plan to overhaul Medicare and Medicaid would cripple the safety-net healthcare programs. Fair criticism? The answer, as Bill Clinton might say, depends on what your definition of "cripple" is. The Ryan plan has been around for months. It's taken on new heft since Ryan, a conservative congressman from Wisconsin, was tapped over the weekend by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney to be his running mate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Reginald Clarke is someone Obamacare was designed to help. The 55-year-old, who was homeless for a time, now has an apartment in Gardena and a street-cleaning job that pays him $14,000 a year. He hadn't visited a doctor in four or five years. Then, last fall, his girlfriend told him he would be eligible for Medi-Cal starting Jan. 1. "I was excited. I could go get a physical," he said. "There are a few things I need. " But joy turned to exasperation when Clarke's application, filed in December, was mistakenly rejected - and then seemed to disappear from county and state computer systems.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- Midnight on Monday is the much-talked-of deadline for Americans to enroll in health plans that will be effective Jan. 1. Here are five key facts to keep in mind. 1. It's a deadline -- sort of. Monday is the last day to sign up for coverage effective Jan. 1, but it's not the last day to sign up overall. Open enrollment continues through March. If a person enrolls Thursday, for example, he or she will still get coverage, but it wouldn't begin until February.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
As the federal insurance website healthcare.gov puts its birth pangs behind it, critics of the Affordable Care Act may well need another attack point. One is already emerging: It's an assault on Medicaid, the federal-state health program that's a linchpin of the effort to expand access to coverage for the poorest Americans. We're being told that Medicaid is lousy insurance -- that many doctors won't accept Medicaid patients, that wait times for appointments are long, even that it's worse than no insurance at all !
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Jimmy Kimmel got some yucks from his audience the other night when he sent faux pollsters out to ask ordinary Americans which they preferred: “Obamacare” or the Affordable Care Act . Of course, they're one and the same, but that didn't stop interviewees from criticizing Obamacare but praising the Affordable Care Act.  A presumably more scientific survey by CNBC found that 46% of Americans oppose Obamacare, while only 37% oppose the Affordable Care...
BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
With the Oct. 1 rollout of a major facet of the Affordable Care Act on the horizon, you'll be hearing a lot about the glitches, loopholes and shortcomings of this most important restructuring of America's healthcare system in our lifetimes. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind: First, the vast majority of these issues result from one crucial compromise made in the drafting of the 2010 law, ostensibly to ease its passage through Congress. That was to leave the system in the hands of private health insurance companies.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration, trying to defuse one of the most contentious issues in its healthcare law, proposed Friday a new way to shield religiously affiliated organizations, such as hospitals and universities, from having to provide contraceptive coverage directly to their employees. Instead, the employees would obtain coverage through a separate, private insurance policy at no cost. The proposed rule also reaffirms that churches and other houses of worship themselves are exempt from the contraceptive mandate in Obama's healthcare overhaul, and makes it easier for institutions to show that they qualify for the exemption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Frustrated with a changing healthcare system that has resulted in longer work days and less time with patients, a growing number of doctors in California and across the nation are turning to a new type of practice — concierge medicine. The model is simple: Doctors charge their patients an annual fee and in turn, give them more time and attention. Rising costs and shrinking insurance reimbursements have prompted doctors to search for innovative ways to keep their solo practices afloat.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2012 | By David Horsey
In the mid-1980s when I was a graduate student in England, my parents came to visit and my mother ended up getting a first-hand look at socialized medicine. It was my dad and mom's one-and-only trip to Europe -- a very big deal -- and I wanted to show them as much as I could. We crossed the English Channel to France and drove to see the cathedral at Chartres. The first night there, Mom slipped and sprained her ankle. By morning, she couldn't walk and was in need of a doctor. We ended up at a hospital where, with no wait at all, she got X-rays and a friendly, highly competent female doctor checked her out and wrapped her leg.  As we were leaving, my mother asked where she should pay the bill.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
“The brain is a body part too,” President Obama said in a speech Monday in which he urged Americans to embrace those struggling with mental illness. Sounds like an innocent enough proposal, right? Like victims of cancer or diabetes, those whose suffering starts in the brain have a claim to public support. Not so for the Daily Caller's Neil Munro , who thinks he's protecting taxpayers from a government PR scheme designed to enrich the mental health industry and sap patients of their resolve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Geography plays a role in whether patients in California have elective operations such as joint replacement, weight loss surgery and gallbladder removal, according to a new study . The California HealthCare Foundation study showed wide variations in patient surgeries across the state. The authors attribute the difference to several factors, including physician preferences and lack of clinical evidence that one procedure is better than another. Patient input also played a role in whether a certain kind of operation was performed.
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