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SPORTS
April 21, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Sacramento might not have a major league baseball team, but the commissioner will pay close attention to a battle there this week between the Angels and StubHub. At issue: Who owns a ticket? Long gone are the days when fans had to buy tickets at the box office or from the neighborhood scalper. As teams shift from paper tickets to bar codes - for downloading and printing at home or scanning from a smartphone - technology enables any fan to be a ticket broker. The Angels and StubHub are the latest combatants in a national debate over whether teams and concert venues can control what fans do with a ticket once they buy it. At stake: the $4 billion fans spend each year to buy sport and concert tickets from parties other than the original seller, according to the Sports Business Journal.
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SPORTS
September 1, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
When the Dodgers acquired Adrian Gonzalez, they inherited a contract that binds him to the team through 2018 at a cost of $125 million. That will give him plenty of chances to make his mark in team history, and he will do so wearing a number that has left its mark in team history. By the end of his career, where might Gonzalez rank on the list of Dodgers to wear uniform No. 23? For now, here's how they rank, according to Times staff writer Bill Shaikin: 1: Kirk Gibson (1988-90)
SPORTS
July 31, 2013 | Chris Erskine
So what's it like in the hyper-exclusive Lexus Dugout Club, hobnobbing with Tommy Baseball and the agents from CAA? Well, Lasorda's a lot more fun than the talent agents, but that's setting the bar pretty low. Let's just say this: The Dugout Club isn't everybody's cup of high-priced tea. But should you get the chance, should some wealthy uncle gift you with a couple of tickets, you might consider going. In fact, call off your wedding. Reschedule that appendectomy. For the Dugout Club is baseball's Magic Kingdom.
SPORTS
December 14, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
There are enough red flags in Josh Hamilton's on-field dossier to make the Angels' five-year, $125-million investment in the slugger seem dubious. Injuries have limited Hamilton, 31, to an average of 123 games a year. Though the outfielder hit .285 with 43 home runs and 128 runs batted in for the Texas Rangers in 2012, he tailed off considerably in the second half, hitting .259 with 16 homers and 53 RBIs in 69 games. Hamilton, who underwent a physical Friday and is scheduled to be introduced at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the ESPN Zone in Downtown Disney, also had a career-high 162 strikeouts, chased far too many pitches outside the strike zone and led major league regulars with a 36% swing-and-miss rate.
SPORTS
May 5, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Mark Walter lives in Chicago. Stan Kasten spent most of his adult life in Atlanta. Peter Guber is an L.A. guy. So, when Guber pitched a nostalgic idea on behalf of L.A. fans, his partners in the new Dodgers ownership group listened. "Curly Coo," Guber told Kasten. "There is nothing like a Curly Coo. " Google that, and you get a bar in Scotland. Kasten had no idea what the heck Guber was talking about. Millions of Dodgers fans could have explained, the ones who cheered on Garvey, Lopes, Russell and Cey, the ones who rooted for Valenzuela, Hershiser and Piazza, all with ice cream dripping down the sides of their faces.
SPORTS
June 30, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
BALTIMORE -- It's easy to forget that Mike Trout, for all his otherworldly talent, was still living with his parents six months ago. His dad hasn't forgotten. Last Monday, when White Sox slugger Paul Konerko went hitless and Trout moved past him to take over the batting lead in the American League, Jeff Trout turned to his son and offered some fatherly advice: "Now get to bed. You've got a game tomorrow," he told his youngest boy, who was spending a rare off-day at home.
SPORTS
September 24, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
SAN FRANCISCO - Catcher A.J. Ellis was alarmed when he first set eyes on Hyun-Jin Ryu in spring training. This was the Clayton Kershaw of South Korea? Whereas Kershaw reported to camp looking as if he was already in top shape, Ryu was noticeably overweight. When the Dodgers ran on the first day, Ryu finished far behind all of his teammates. "This guy has to pick it up or this is going to be a failed experiment," Ellis thought at the time. Ellis laughed as he recalled his initial impressions of Ryu. What was once a cause for concern is now a source of humor, as the addition of Ryu has turned out to be one of the smartest moves made by the Dodgers in the last year.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Cuba's government has lifted its ban on professional sports, allowing athletes to sign contracts and compete for pay outside the island. The change will make it easier for Cubans to compete professionally in Europe and Asia, but it does not necessarily mean a new wave of Cuban baseball players will be landing in Major League Baseball. Professional sports in the United States are still bound by a 51-year-old embargo that bans nearly all business transactions between Americans and the Cuban government.
SPORTS
February 12, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
Whenever someone asks me if I want to do lunch, they always wonder if I have a favorite spot, and I always lie. I tell them about a funky steakhouse in Glendale, a bustling Chinese joint on Broadway, a bright Mexican diner in Pasadena. I never tell them the truth, because they couldn't handle the truth. I never tell them about my real favorite place, because it's my place, my secret, my unvarnished connection with this city's sporting soul, my midday siesta among this city's sports dreams, the darn near perfect spot for a sportswriter and his peanut butter sandwich.
SPORTS
June 18, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
WASHINGTON - Roger Clemens, known as "The Rocket" for the fastball that dominated major league batters, won his most critical contest yet Monday when jurors found him not guilty of lying to Congress about steroid use. For nearly five years, Clemens steadfastly had denied using steroids or human growth hormone, but this time a jury believed him, or at least was unconvinced by the testimony of his former trainer Brian McNamee that he had regularly...
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