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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
The federal government has tried just about everything to stop the flow of migrants crossing the border illegally. It boosted the number of Border Patrol agents, made punishment harsher, deployed drones and motion sensors, built and rebuilt fences. For years it has even quietly funded the dissemination in Mexico of songs and mini-documentaries about dangers at the border. Now it is using a more proactive tactic: Since last year, agents in Arizona have called Mexican and Central American television and radio stations and newspapers, asking for the opportunity to tell of the dangers of crossing illegally, particularly through the Sonoran Desert . The outreach, which was initially greeted with skepticism, is being embraced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google Now, a mobile feature designed by the Silicon Valley tech giant to give users information they might want before they search for it, is finally available for the Apple iPhone and iPad. The feature arrived Monday morning as part of the latest update for the iPhone and iPad Google app after debuting last summer exclusively for Android devices. Google Now is a big part of the search company's efforts to remain users' go-to service when seeking information on their phone or tablet.
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OPINION
July 24, 2009
Re "Inside the mind of a killer 'Santa,' " Column One, July 11 After reading your story, I am so surprised that Bruce Pardo was able to buy so many weapons from the same store without raising any suspicion. Your story says that California law limits sales of concealable firearms to one per customer every 30 days, but perhaps if this store had been more proactive and called the police, this tragic crime could have been avoided. Alejandro Lopez Eagle Rock :: This story was difficult to read but helpful in comprehending the magnitude of this tragedy that was so disturbing to me when it occurred last Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
The federal government has tried just about everything to stop the flow of migrants crossing the border illegally. It boosted the number of Border Patrol agents, made punishment harsher, deployed drones and motion sensors, built and rebuilt fences. For years it has even quietly funded the dissemination in Mexico of songs and mini-documentaries about dangers at the border. Now it is using a more proactive tactic: Since last year, agents in Arizona have called Mexican and Central American television and radio stations and newspapers, asking for the opportunity to tell of the dangers of crossing illegally, particularly through the Sonoran Desert . The outreach, which was initially greeted with skepticism, is being embraced.
OPINION
October 4, 1998
You can add hundreds, even thousands, of police officers to the LAPD (Sept. 25). Unless you make L.A. an "armed camp," a substantial force increase will have little long-term effect on crime. Where are you going to get all the courtrooms, judges and attorneys to handle the arrest and prosecution load wrought by this enlarged police force? As it is now, the court system is bucking the LAPD and L.A. Sheriff's Department arrest volume. And all the police in the world won't do any good if the others are not "proactive" and just sit in their cars answering radio call after radio call, after the fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004
Margie REESE is on the right track ["L.A. Arts Group Turns to Donors," by Mike Boehm, Aug. 17]. Government cannot do it all. We, the people, have to help or we will have a society devoid of beauty, compassion, kindness and joy. Bravo to Reese for her willingness, enthusiasm and energy to take a proactive approach to maintaining and improving the city of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department. Thomas E. Brandlin Los Angeles
OPINION
January 16, 2006
Re "Africa's tinderbox," editorial, Jan. 12 What a shame that in poverty-devastated Ethiopia and Eritrea there is money for arms but not for significant development aid. My son has traveled in this area and found the people to be shockingly poor yet hospitable and very friendly to Americans. But where the people have no hope, governments can fail, and the resultant instability allows terrorism to flourish. It is in our interest for our foreign policy to be proactive with developmental aid and less reliant on reacting to crises.
OPINION
July 29, 2006
Re "The LAPD and the myth of the 'warrior cop,' " Current, July 23 As a resident of the neighborhood east of Robertson Boulevard, I take issue with Heather MacDonald's statement: "Equally specious is the allegation that the department cares more about wealthy neighborhoods than poor." After three young people were gunned down on our streets in three days, The Times printed the statistics ("Killing Highlights Brutal Border," July 14). Last year, there were 121 assaults and robberies east of Robertson -- and no assaults and only one robbery on the west side of Robertson, "where the choicest real estate approaches Beverly Hills standards."
OPINION
October 4, 2006
Re "Symptom of a Body in Distress," Oct. 1 The 10 million residents of the nation's largest county are ill-served by the five blundering monarchs who make up the L.A. County Board of Supervisors. How many more Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center catastrophes will it take before the citizenry is shaken from its torpor and demands a leadership structure designed to be proactive instead of reactive? It is time to revisit the proposal for an elected chief executive -- a county "mayor" -- and a legislative body of at least nine members.
SPORTS
September 27, 1997
I am amused over Tony Tavares' recent quote about Paul Kariya's contract negotiations. . . . "It's easy to say 'pay him whatever.' Well, whatever's got to come from somewhere." Let me help you. How about from the annual increases in season-ticket prices, parking and concessions that the fans endure, or the millions the fans spend on Duck-logo merchandise, or the millions gained from sellout after sellout at the Pond? Clearly the money is available. Your desire to wait and simply react to others' situations is that of a follower's.
HEALTH
February 27, 2012 | By Nancy Franklin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"You have malignant melanoma," the dermatologist told me. But that wasn't the worst of it. The worst part was that thepathologist's report had been in my chart for over a year and my dermatologist had never told me. As I sat there absorbing the news, I kept thinking, "How could this happen?" I've spent my career in healthcare; I'd like to think I know how to navigate the system. I'm the one who never puts off a Pap test or mammogram; who had a colonoscopy at age 50; who gets flu shots and regular checkups.
SPORTS
December 31, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
Keith Primeau has not put on his full hockey equipment since the day he retired from professional hockey, a career cut short by several concussions, not all of them documented. To say he has good days would be stretching the definition. "I can honestly say here that there isn't a day that goes by that I don't sense I've damaged my brain," said Primeau, who retired in 2005 at 34. "Whether I stand up and get a headache or I'm resting and I get a headache, I know exactly why I had to stop playing.
SPORTS
September 1, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin and E. Scott Reckard
Frank McCourt needed money last year, so he solicited an infomercial king to invest in the Dodgers. He offered an array of enticements: game tickets, preferred parking, employee discounts on team merchandise, invitations to news conferences and — atop the list of benefits — "Championship Ring (when we win World Series). " McCourt proposed a deal in which he would receive $25 million right away. He would have five years to either pay the money back, with interest, or convert the loan into a tiny share of team ownership.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Food and Drug Administration, the nation's chief watchdog on food safety, is too often caught flat-footed when problems arise, a health advisory panel said Tuesday, urging the agency to focus more on preventing outbreaks of illness by targeting facilities and products most likely to make people sick. The panel said the FDA is trying to apply so-called risk-based management in food safety in piecemeal fashion and does not have an overall plan, or the money, to implement it effectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2010 | By Tony Barboza
A dozen notables mounted bikes outside the entrance to Long Beach City Hall late last year for the unveiling of a metallic bicycle sculpture with a lofty proclamation: "Long Beach, the most bicycle friendly city in America," it reads in bold steel lettering under the likeness of an antique bicycle. It was a little premature, leaders admit. "But we're striving for that," said City Manager Pat West, a longtime cyclist. While other cities spin their wheels, Long Beach is joining the ranks of places such as Portland, Ore., San Francisco and New York City that have made safe passage for bikes a priority, even at the expense of traffic lanes.
OPINION
July 24, 2009
Re "Inside the mind of a killer 'Santa,' " Column One, July 11 After reading your story, I am so surprised that Bruce Pardo was able to buy so many weapons from the same store without raising any suspicion. Your story says that California law limits sales of concealable firearms to one per customer every 30 days, but perhaps if this store had been more proactive and called the police, this tragic crime could have been avoided. Alejandro Lopez Eagle Rock :: This story was difficult to read but helpful in comprehending the magnitude of this tragedy that was so disturbing to me when it occurred last Christmas.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1994
I was a little amazed by Michael Schrage's techno-trash polemic ("Corporate '1984' May Intrude About 10 Years Late," July 28). Are we to believe that it is not OK for an employer to measure and attempt to improve upon the productivity of a data-entry operator? And just what is particularly sinister about monitoring the telephone effectiveness of customer service employees and thereby ensuring that customers are properly treated? The spread of proactive quality management will depend largely on data collection and data analysis as learning tools.
NEWS
October 27, 1999
Thank you for the wonderfully written article about [Duane Noriyuki's] parents (series, Oct. 24-26). I read Monday's article, then dug the Sunday paper out of the bin to read part one. [Noriyuki's] writing captures and communicates a strength and beauty of the older generation. There is also a timeless rhythm in the piece, very close to the land and very quiet. CHRIS MICHIKA Via e-mail My father was born here of Italian parentage, and was the intermediate generation between the stoicism and paternal silence of the foreign born and our second, more open generation.
HEALTH
April 27, 2009 | Francesca Lunzer Kritz
Unless you've been rushed to the hospital in an emergency, the time to start thinking about paying the bill for hospital care comes as soon as your doctor says you need to have a test, procedure or surgery. "What patients have to pay hospitals is not set in stone," says Mark Rukavina, executive director of the Access Project, a Boston-based health reform advocacy organization. Hospitals do have a master list of charges, based on that hospital's cost of delivering care.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
Two prominent governors, California's Arnold Schwarzenegger and Pennsylvania's Edward G. Rendell, sent a memo to President Obama saying he needed to assert more political leadership instead of leaving it to Congress to draft a plan for improving the nation's aging highways, bridges and ports.
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