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Procedure

SPORTS
May 9, 1998
In the May 4 Morning Briefing, a reference was made that Jay Buhner insisted on being awake for his knee arthroscopy and (that) the procedure be videotaped. As a point of reference, all arthroscopies are done with a video monitor to guide the surgeon, and taping the procedure is standard. As far as being awake, this is the preferred method. KEITH FEDER, M.D., Los Angeles
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NEWS
September 21, 2010
A study of bariatric surgery on California adolescents shows that growing numbers of families are opting for a surgical solution to their children's obesity. But a study on trends in bariatric surgery among those under 21 shows that, in this population, the surgical weight-loss technique is disproportionately embraced by girls, and by white adolescents in general. The study , published this week in the journal Pediatrics, tallies a dramatic increase in weight-loss surgery between 2005 and 2007, with a surgical procedure not yet approved by the FDA for use on children showing the steepest rise.
OPINION
April 1, 2011
Imagine you decided to have a medical procedure but state law said that, even though your doctor supported your decision, you had to be screened to see if you were mentally fit for it, and then had to go to a clinic that directly opposes doing the procedure and listen to its spiel before you could go ahead. Most of us would call that unconscionable interference in our ability to make decisions about our own health. Now imagine you're a pregnant woman in South Dakota. Under a law signed by Gov. Dennis Daugaard last week, women who seek an abortion will have to wait 72 hours, undergo two visits to physicians to be checked for unspecified physical and mental risk factors, and be proselytized by an antiabortion counseling center before they can have the procedure.
SPORTS
May 31, 1989 | From Times wire services
Patrick Ewing, who led the New York Knicks to their first Atlantic Division title in almost two decades, underwent an arthroscopic procedure on his right knee today. Dr. Norman Scott, who operated on the knee five years ago, said no new damage was found and the 7-foot center will be ready for next season. He said the procedure was similar to the one performed on point guard Mark Jackson that sidelined him for just three weeks during the season. Scott said that in addition to examining the knee, he removed some loose articular cartilage.
HEALTH
July 26, 2013 | By Judy Mandell
Mary Southwick was 34 when she developed pain on the bottom of one foot. After seeing a neurologist who said she had a nerve injury caused by dancing, she developed thrombophlebitis and was admitted to the hospital. An intern underdosed her heparin (blood thinner), and she suffered a large blood clot in a lung. This was soon followed by a heart attack, then respiratory failure, renal failure and shock. Her physician husband interceded and transferred her care to a trusted cardiologist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1995
A strong exception is taken to the article in the Oct. 14 Orange County edition ("New to the Joint: Cartilage Growth Method Offers Knee Patients Relief") regarding joint cartilage transplantation. This article touted the positive aspects of this procedure, in which defects in cartilage of the knee have been filled with laboratory-grown cartilage cells but failed to point out the experimental nature and possible negative aspects of the treatment. The hype for this procedure stems from a Swedish study in which 16 cases were performed.
NEWS
March 9, 1990
It is with complete and total disbelief that I read about the abominable procedure encouraged by Dr. Philip J. DiSaia of tearing out the ovaries of women over 35 years of age if there is a history of ovarian cancer in their immediate family ("When TV and Life Part Company," Feb. 27). How does he know if a woman can tolerate replacement estrogen therapy after this barbaric procedure is inflicted on her? Nothing replaces the role of one's natural ovaries. Endocrinologists are just finding out the role natural hormones play in the quality of our lives.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1989
A Your Wheels column on May 4 recommended a method for combating mold in automobile air conditioners. The process, suggested by an allergist who had safely used it in the past, involved mixing vinegar and household bleach and placing the solution in a pan in a car. Several academic and industry experts have since raised objections to the procedure, saying it could cause irritation in some individuals. In the worst case, the experts said, the vinegar-bleach mixture could produce harmful or irritating fumes.
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