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Procedure

BUSINESS
February 23, 2010 | David Lazarus
It's wrong to say that Bob Iritano is fighting for his life; he knows he's lost that battle. What he's fighting for is time. You wouldn't know it to look at him, but Iritano, 50, has terminal cancer. It's not a question of whether he's going to die. The only question is when, and how much longer he'll be with his family. Iritano, understandably, wants all the time he can get -- many years, if possible. His health insurer, he believes, has a different time frame in mind. "My best guess is that they want me dead as soon as possible," he said matter-of-factly as we spoke at the dining room table of his Westlake Village home.
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SPORTS
May 31, 1989 | From Times wire services
Patrick Ewing, who led the New York Knicks to their first Atlantic Division title in almost two decades, underwent an arthroscopic procedure on his right knee today. Dr. Norman Scott, who operated on the knee five years ago, said no new damage was found and the 7-foot center will be ready for next season. He said the procedure was similar to the one performed on point guard Mark Jackson that sidelined him for just three weeks during the season. Scott said that in addition to examining the knee, he removed some loose articular cartilage.
HEALTH
July 26, 2013 | By Judy Mandell
Mary Southwick was 34 when she developed pain on the bottom of one foot. After seeing a neurologist who said she had a nerve injury caused by dancing, she developed thrombophlebitis and was admitted to the hospital. An intern underdosed her heparin (blood thinner), and she suffered a large blood clot in a lung. This was soon followed by a heart attack, then respiratory failure, renal failure and shock. Her physician husband interceded and transferred her care to a trusted cardiologist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1995
A strong exception is taken to the article in the Oct. 14 Orange County edition ("New to the Joint: Cartilage Growth Method Offers Knee Patients Relief") regarding joint cartilage transplantation. This article touted the positive aspects of this procedure, in which defects in cartilage of the knee have been filled with laboratory-grown cartilage cells but failed to point out the experimental nature and possible negative aspects of the treatment. The hype for this procedure stems from a Swedish study in which 16 cases were performed.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1989
A Your Wheels column on May 4 recommended a method for combating mold in automobile air conditioners. The process, suggested by an allergist who had safely used it in the past, involved mixing vinegar and household bleach and placing the solution in a pan in a car. Several academic and industry experts have since raised objections to the procedure, saying it could cause irritation in some individuals. In the worst case, the experts said, the vinegar-bleach mixture could produce harmful or irritating fumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Oregon researchers are preparing to begin human trials of a new, nonsurgical technique to prevent pregnancies. The procedure involves inserting small metal coils into the Fallopian tubes through a tiny catheter. The coils interfere with the movement of eggs and sperm, blocking pregnancy. Dr. Amy Thurmond told a meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology that they had successfully performed the painless procedure on 13 of 14 women who were undergoing hysterectomies.
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