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WORLD
July 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
China's product safety watchdog said today that it had revoked the business licenses of several firms that had exported products tainted with diethylene glycol or melamine. The General Administration for Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine said the business license had been pulled for Taixing Glycerin Factory, accused of exporting diethylene glycol and passing it off as 99.5% pure glycerin. It went into Panamanian medicines that killed at least 51 people.
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NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The White House announcement this week that President Bush plans to nominate Mary Sheila Gall to head the Consumer Product Safety Commission signals a radical shift in the government's oversight of consumer products--from an agency recently known for its regulatory reach to one more likely to be characterized by its regulatory restraint.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled the president's plan Friday to toughen civil and criminal penalties for companies that fail to notify the government or consumers about potentially dangerous products. The legislation would upgrade willful criminal violations of product safety laws from misdemeanors to felonies and eliminate the $1.6-million cap on civil penalties. "With this legislation, the punishment will finally start to fit the crime," said Mrs.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday called for a temporary halt to the sale and use of silicone gel breast implants while the agency evaluates recently obtained information that has raised new concerns about the safety of the controversial devices. "Physicians should cease using them and manufacturers should stop distributing them," FDA Commissioner David A. Kessler said at a press conference, adding: "The FDA cannot assure women of their safety at this time."
BUSINESS
August 3, 1996 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court jury Friday denied a claim by a former Allergan Inc. employee that she was forced out after allegedly being pressured to hide concerns involving product safety from regulators.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appellate court has ruled that persons implanted with certain heart valves made by Shiley Inc.--a type with a history of life-threatening failures--may sue the manufacturer for fraud even though their valves have not malfunctioned. The 4th District Court of Appeal on Wednesday reversed the opinion of an Orange County Superior Court judge that Judy Khan of Roanoke, Va., had filed her grievances prematurely because the heart valve which she received in 1983 has not malfunctioned.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The nation's top three crayon manufacturers have agreed to reformulate their product to eliminate an ingredient that may contain asbestos or asbestos-like fibers, after Consumer Product Safety Commission tests found small amounts of the cancer-causing material in some crayons. The findings, to be announced formally today, were not considered serious enough to warrant a recall, commission officials said.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
In August, Mattel Inc. recalled 7.3 million Polly Pocket play sets with small magnets that could come loose and, if swallowed, tear holes in a child's digestive system. Hearing that, Lisa Davis didn't think twice about removing the toys from her 5-year-old daughter's room and "chucking them in the trash" rather than returning the items for a replacement. "It's just not worth my time to go through the hassle," Davis said.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about gum disease, Gerald Dageford decided to try an anti-tartar toothpaste. Within days, his gums bled and his teeth ached. When he stopped using the toothpaste, his painful symptoms disappeared. Dentists say Dageford's problem isn't unusual. His dentist sees one patient a week with similar ailments. "We used to see more cases," said Torrance dentist Alan Jones. "But we've taken most of our patients off the toothpaste."
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