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Production Costs

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BUSINESS
July 5, 1990 | From United Press International
The giant West German Daimler-Benz group, which registered healthy profits in 1989, will cut production costs and possibly lay off workers to prevent risking "all healthy jobs," the group's chairman said Wednesday. The company reported $2.72 billion in pretax profit in 1989, the highest of any German company, Chairman Edzard Reuter told 9,500 shareholders at the company's annual meeting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Looking to borrow a page from its all-news radio station WINS-AM New York -- whose motto is "You give us 22 minutes, we'll give you the world" -- CBS is considering launching a digital news platform that would complement its broadcast news programming. The idea is essentially to create a rolling newscast for online platforms that could be streamed to mobile devices. CBS News has often been seen as disadvantaged because it lacks a cable news operation with which to share production costs and to create new revenue streams like NBC has with MSNBC and CNBC.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 1987 | From Associated Press
Farmers earned a record $52 billion in 1986, mostly because of declining expenses, according to an annual report released Monday by the Department of Agriculture. USDA economists said a further easing of production costs may help send net cash income up again this year to $54 billion to $58 billion. Net cash income is the difference between cash receipts and cash expenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2013 | By David Ng
With a burst of shimmering confetti and streamers, Cirque du Soleil's "Iris" bade a festive "au revoir" to Los Angeles on Saturday at the Dolby Theatre. The show, which opened in 2011 and is believed to have cost close to $100 million to produce, was supposed to run for at least 10 years in Hollywood but closed much earlier than expected after it had failed to generate sufficient box-office interest. Saturday evening's final performance of "Iris" managed to achieve what the show struggled to do all along -- playing to a packed house.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond Burr took an unaccustomed pay cut on NBC's "Perry Mason" movies. On "Quantum Leap," the fantasy drama about a scientist traveling through time, pop tunes from the '50s and '60s no longer are heard. The rights fees cost too much. Twentieth Television, producer of "Anything But Love," made the supreme sacrifice: It pulled the plug on the Jamie Lee Curtis sitcom.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1991 | From Reuters
General Motors Corp. and Chrysler Corp., facing their worst sales slump in years, said Tuesday that they would raise prices of their 1992 model cars. GM, the nation's biggest auto maker, said prices for most of its 1992 model-year passenger cars will on average cost 3.1% more than comparably equipped 1991 models. Struggling Chrysler followed suit, saying it will increase 1992 domestic car prices by an average of 1.4%.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
Production of the B-2 Stealth bomber may exceed a government-imposed cost ceiling of $44 billion, according to a congressional study. Problems in the bat-winged airplane's radar-evading technology, its own terrain-avoidance radar and its computer software, as well as testing delays, threaten to raise production costs for the 20 bombers ordered by the Pentagon, the report concludes. The report by the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress, is dated Sept.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Toy giant Mattel Inc.reported a 53% decline in profit in the first quarter, sending its stock down more than 9%, after higher production costs, slower sales of Barbie and Hot Wheels and a recent acquisition affected its bottom line. For the three months ended March 31, sales totaled $928.4 million, down 2% compared with $951.9 million in the same quarter last year, the company said Monday. Profit dropped to $7.8 million, or 2 cents a share, from $16.6 million, or 5 cents. The results fell below analyst expectations of a profit of 7 cents a share.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as Warner Bros. Pictures is casting new villains for "Batman II," the original blockbuster is still wallowing in red ink--thanks in large part to the Caped Crusader's archenemy, the Joker. The fifth-highest grossing motion picture in history and the No. 1 box-office hit of all time for Warners is still $35.8 million in the red and not likely to ever show a profit, according to financial statements obtained by The Times.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Toy giant Mattel Inc.reported a 53% decline in profit in the first quarter, sending its stock down more than 9%, after higher production costs, slower sales of Barbie and Hot Wheels and a recent acquisition affected its bottom line. For the three months ended March 31, sales totaled $928.4 million, down 2% compared with $951.9 million in the same quarter last year, the company said Monday. Profit dropped to $7.8 million, or 2 cents a share, from $16.6 million, or 5 cents. The results fell below analyst expectations of a profit of 7 cents a share.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2011 | By Dima Alzayat, Los Angeles Times
Woody Allen, the Brooklyn-born director who defined New York for filmgoers with such hits as "Bullets Over Broadway" and "Annie Hall," is once again choosing Europe over Manhattan as the stage for his next movie. Following up films shot in London, Barcelona and Paris — where Allen set the recently released "Midnight in Paris," his most successful movie in years — the idiosyncratic filmmaker is now focusing his lens on Rome. On Monday, Allen began filming his next release, "Bop Decameron," in the Italian capital, an event celebrated by the city's mayor, Gianni Alemanno.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Nine studio executives sat in a glass-enclosed conference room in Beverly Hills, discussing potential snowy locales for filming later this year. Utah was a viable option, advised the head of production. So, too, was upstate New York — in part because of tax credits. Over the course of the hourlong production meeting, the executives also received casting updates, discussed social media plans for one soon-to-debut series and mulled over a festival screening strategy for another project.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
A cable television commercial for the Redondo Beach restaurant Eat at Joe's features high-definition video, a cast of 40 and a catchy jingle that will leave you humming. Particularly enthusiastic about the slick new ad was Alex Jordan, the restaurateur who decided to take the plunge into television advertising after meeting an Altadena couple who were starting their own ad agency. They wrote and produced the 30-second spot for $5,000, and they helped him broker a deal to deliver it to 300,000 homes for $1 every time it ran. In a still tough economy in Southern California, hard times in advertising and media have led to a surprising bonanza for small businesses seeking to market themselves.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
The great programming migration to cable continues. Turner Broadcasting, just one week after signing former NBC late-night host Conan O'Brien, has teamed up with CBS in a 14-year, $10.8-billion deal for television and Internet rights to the immensely popular NCAA March Madness college basketball tournament. The move comes as broadcast television struggles with rising programming costs and greater competition for viewers and advertisers. Although the NCAA tournament is a strong performer for CBS, the costs of covering the games were starting to outweigh the benefits for the network.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2009 | By Claudia Eller
In acquiring legendary Universal Pictures, Comcast Corp. would make its Hollywood debut during a particularly turbulent time for the movie business. Not only are all studios grappling with declining DVD sales and shifting consumer habits in entertainment, but Universal is also struggling to correct course from a prolonged box-office slump, runaway production costs and turmoil in the executive suites. Comcast wouldn't be able to exert much influence over the operations of Universal until well into next year after its merger with NBC Universal is finalized.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pabst Tells Union of Payroll Cut: The Milwaukee beer maker has notified the Brewery Workers union that two-thirds of the approximately 400 employees at its plant there will be laid off by December under a plan to shift production elsewhere. Pabst Brewing Co. had said earlier this year that it would hire G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis., to produce some of its beer if it could not cut production costs through employee concessions.
NEWS
January 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, unhappy with the skyrocketing costs of the Air Force's newest air-to-air missile, designed by Hughes Aircraft Co., has ordered a delay in production and left open the possibility that he might actually cancel the program, it was learned today.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2009 | Steven Mufson, Mufson writes for the Washington Post.
The nation's largest producer of corn-based ethanol said it had slashed the cost of producing cellulosic ethanol from corncobs and that it would be able to compete with gasoline in two years. Poet, which currently produces 1.5 billion gallons a year of ethanol from corn, said its 1-year-old pilot plant has reduced the cost of making ethanol from corncobs to $2.35 a gallon from $4.13 by cutting capital costs and using an improved "cocktail" of enzymes. Moreover, the company said it could use a byproduct called lignin as fuel and that it would provide all the energy needed for the cellulosic plant as well as 80% of the energy that would be needed by a conventional corn-based distillery making twice the amount of ethanol.
SPORTS
June 25, 2008 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The most prominent manufacturer of maple bats said Tuesday that baseball players and owners should ensure the quality of bats by paying roughly triple the price.
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