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Production Costs

ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1987 | PAT H. BROESKE
In Peoria, Ill. (pop.: 124,000), the town that has come to stand as the metaphor for Middle America, moviegoers didn't stand in line for "Ishtar" at its opening shows last weekend. Paul Evans, 24, who manages Peoria's biggest showplace--the 800-seat Fox Theater--said that if it were up to him, he'd send "Ishtar" on its way and run in another movie. His theater was less than half full for the main shows (at 7:15 p.m.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | From Reuters
Nokia said Friday that it will achieve substantial savings by shifting some of its handset manufacturing from the United States to lower-cost facilities in South Korea and Mexico and cutting 800 U.S. jobs. The move by the world's largest cell phone maker is part of a seismic industry shift of handset production from high-cost European and North American plants to low-cost factories in Eastern Europe, Mexico and Asia.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can say how much the final bill will be for cleaning up the hazardous waste sites dotting neighborhoods, industrial parks and federal land across the country. Congress has appropriated $10.1 billion so far for the Superfund program alone, but even conservative estimates put the final price tag at four to five times that amount. Most independent estimates are far higher.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing congressional criticism over the $75-billion cost of the B-2 Stealth bomber, Northrop has launched an intensive effort to cut the bomber's cost that will involve such wide-ranging measures as layoffs, a trimmed-down inspection program and reduced security.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to regain investors' affections after a disappointing first quarter, Fluor Corp. on Tuesday named a longtime company executive to head its chief operating unit and vowed to shave operating expenses by $100 million a year. It is not clear whether the cost-cutting effort will include layoffs. Fluor's operating expenses totaled $10.6 billion, so a $100-million annual savings would represent less than 1%.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here, in a densely populated border city across the Rio Grande from Brownsville, Tex., the name of an infamous locale in India is heard with stunning frequency. "We don't want to be the next Bhopal," said Erasmo Lucio Garza, referring to the site of the 1984 toxic gas leak at a Union Carbide subsidiary that left almost 3,000 dead and 200,000 injured in the world's worst industrial accident.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
The maker of the Today Sponge, once the most popular over-the-counter contraceptive for women, is discontinuing the product, saying it can't meet stringent new government safety rules. Whitehall-Robins Healthcare, which voluntarily suspended production of the sponges last year, said Tuesday that upgrading its manufacturing plant to meet the rules would cost too much. Whitehall is the world's only maker of contraceptive sponges.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
Cockroaches rent for $25 a day. Blowing up a car costs $500 to $1,000 just for explosives. A top cinematographer earns $25,000 a week. An A-list movie star goes for $20 million a picture. Toss in $5,000 a week for the star's meals, $4,500 a week for his hairstylist, $3,000 for his masseuse and $40,000 every time he hops aboard a private Gulfstream jet to take a break from filming and you get some idea of why the cost of studio-made movies is spiraling out of control in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1990
Mobil Oil Corp. has set a record for campaign spending in Torrance, so far paying more than $360,000 in the hope of defeating a March 6 ballot measure that would eliminate the use of hydrofluoric acid at its refinery there. Mobil has said a conversion to less volatile sulfuric acid would cost $100 million. The oil company has far outspent supporters of the measure, who reported $7,600 in expenditures through Feb. 17.
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