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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A writer in love with the evanescence of truth, Harold Pinter can succeed or fail on stage for reasons no larger than a flea. And it's not always complete success or utter failure. The difference between a solid Pinter production and a production with something extra, with a blackjack behind its back, cannot be detected by the naked eye. You only realize the difference if, on the way back to your car, in an exhilaratingly strange way, your head hurts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2002 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Conflicts far beyond those supplied by the text complicate "The Chase," the final presentation of Woodland Hills Community Theatre's 2002 season at the West Valley Playhouse in Canoga Park. Horton Foote's 1952 account of a disillusioned Texas sheriff and the escaped convict bent on destroying him here finds the author's burgeoning early voice inadvertently clashing with a wildly misguided approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Mark Ravenhill, the English playwright best known for his play with the unprintable title (let's just call it "Shopping and Copulating"), isn't one for bromides and gooey sentiments. In "pool (no water)," now receiving its L.A. premiere at the Complex's Flight Theatre in a highly visceral Monkey Wrench Collective production, he exposes the darker side of the artistic underground. Suffice it to say, this isn't about the nobility of the creative calling. The premise of this work, first performed in 2006, is attention-grabbing: A visual artist (serenely played by Jessica Lamprinos)
OPINION
August 2, 2012
Colombia 's cocaine production fell by nearly 25% in 2011 from the previous year, and was down by more than 70% since 2001, according to the White House. A report released this week by the Office of National Drug Control Policy suggests that the Andean country once known as the largest producer of cocaine has scored a remarkable victory. That's great news, if indeed the latest estimates are accurate. But the report is at odds with a United Nations survey released last week that concluded that Colombia's cocaine production remains virtually unchanged, dropping by a mere 1% since 2010.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1992 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shop Television Network Inc. in Burbank, once a distant third in the hotly competitive U.S. home shopping market, has filed for bankruptcy protection after one of its largest creditors won a court order to repossess most of the network's video production equipment. The filing under Chapter 11 of U.S. bankruptcy laws puts the court order and other litigation on hold while Shop Television works out a plan with its creditors to repay its debts. The company listed $10 million in assets and $4.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | By Don Lee and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
About 40 miles west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, another kind of crisis may be unfolding — this one striking at the heart of the world's multibillion-dollar market for smartphones, portable music players and other cutting-edge electronics. The powerful earthquake that rocked Japan last month knocked out a hillside factory owned by Shin-Etsu Chemical Co. Little known outside industry circles, Shin-Etsu is the world's biggest producer of advanced silicon wafers, a key material needed for the manufacturing of semiconductors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2008 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
Adapt a classic novel for the stage and you're bound to come up with a few memorable moments of drama. It's like buying an artistic insurance policy -- no matter how badly your adaptation fails, the original novel is there to save you from total disaster. "My Antonia," currently at the Rubicon Theatre in Ventura, contains a handful of truly moving scenes about failed love, growing old and learning to live with regret. For that, we can thank Willa Cather, who wrote the novel of the same name in 1918.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota's smart, sleek production of Eugene Ionesco's "Rhinoceros" at Royce Hall was a sight for sore eyes over the weekend. Not that this offering from Théâtre de la Ville-Paris convinced me that the play is entirely deserving of its status as an absurdist classic. This may be the playwright's most popular effort, but it's hardly his most theatrically effective. Yet the return of international theater to UCLA is undeniably an occasion for rejoicing. Formerly known as UCLA Live (which housed the suspended International Theatre Festival)
BUSINESS
April 4, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Feature film activity on the streets of Los Angeles rebounded in the first quarter of this year, but the gains were offset by a continued falloff in television shoots that's due to competition from New York and other cities. Location filming for movies — those shot on streets and in noncertified soundstages — generated 1,019 production days in the first quarter, up 16% over the same period a year ago. The city and county benefited from several smaller movies, including the comedy "Coffee Town," with Ben Schwartz, and Millennium Films' "Lovelace," a film about porn star Linda Lovelace starring Amanda Seyfried and James Franco that received a state film tax credit.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2009 | Richard Verrier
One of Hollywood's largest prop shops is closing, the latest sign that the falloff in local film and TV production is taking its toll on small businesses that serve the entertainment industry. 20th Century Props of North Hollywood said Thursday that it would shut its doors next month because of mounting business losses. The prop shop, which supplied the chandeliers in the blockbuster "Titanic" and futuristic furniture in "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen," has been a fixture for two decades.
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