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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999
Re "Michigan Man Swears by His Right to Use Profanity," Jan. 25: The fact that a person could be fined for using certain words called "profanity" is a victory for stupidity. People who think that certain words are bad are the ones who need help. People who do not impose restrictions on their language need to be protected from those who feel that some language is "bad." It's a shame that some people teach children that some language is "bad." Children need to be protected from such silliness and should be taught that there are no bad words, just misguided or ignorant people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is learning that a bad situation can always get worse.  Video has emerged that shows him angry and out of breath, ranting about killing someone. "It's first-degree murder!" "No holds barred. " "He dies or I die. " "I'll rip his ... throat out. " The Toronto Star has the video (caution: there's a lot of profanity), possibly taken with a cellphone. The release of the footage by the news outlet spurred another apology from Ford -- who recently admitted to and apologized for having smoked crack cocaine .  He calls the video "extremely embarrassing" and says he was "extremely inebriated" at the time.
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SPORTS
December 26, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Once again Twitter has helped an athlete get himself in trouble. This time it's Cleveland Browns return man Josh Cribbs. Cribbs fumbled a punt during Sunday's 34-12 loss to Denver, and when he checked his Twitter account later he found he was the recipient of several tweets from fans criticizing his lackluster play in the game. He responded: “See all the negativity on twitter after I gave my life to this,” then offered a profane suggestion to “all u who are against me.”  Cribbs apologized Wednesday, saying he was more mad at himself than anyone else, and that he realizes true Browns fans would not try to criticize him like that.
SPORTS
September 17, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Bo Pelini doesn't seem to handle criticism too well. Hours after lashing out at one of Nebraska's all-time great players for negative comments on Twitter, the Cornhuskers coach found himself apologizing Monday for a nearly 2-year-old profanity-laced rant about the team's "fair-weather" fans. The sports website Deadspin.com posted an audio recording of Pelini speaking off the air with Husker Sports Network play-by-play man Greg Sharpe in October 2011. The coach was coming off a win over Ohio State but had faced criticism from fans and the media the previous week after a 31-point loss at Wisconsin.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | From Associated Press
It's up for several honors at Sunday's Academy Awards ceremony, but already "Crash" has taken first prize when it comes to the most curse words in a movie nominated for a best picture Oscar, according to the movie tracking group FamilyMediaGuide.com. The organization, which tracks incidents of profanity, sex, violence and tobacco use in films, reported that "Crash" wins the most-profane award with its 182 expletives, including 99 utterances of the F-word.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Television is cussing up an increasingly blue streak, according to a study of the major broadcast networks. "During the 2002-2003 season, the broadcast networks attempted to rewrite the book on language standards for television," the Parents Television Council, a watchdog group, reported this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Disorderly-conduct charges have been dropped against a 26-year-old dance student who used profanity at John Wayne Airport, officials said. A related free-speech lawsuit challenging Orange County's law governing conduct in airports is still pending, but settlement negotiations are underway, the student's lawyer said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL
If he had it to do all over again, Encino defense attorney Alex Kessel says he'd call prosecutor Renee Urman a "lowlife" in need of diet pills, but he'd leave out the four-letter words. Kessel escaped being held in contempt of court Thursday when he apologized to Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Kathryne Ann Stoltz for using profane language in her courtroom. He apologized to the court staff, saying he didn't mean to offend them. To Urman, however, Kessel offered no apology.
SPORTS
October 27, 1993 | Prep Sports Editor Bob Rohwer and Jon Weisman
In a newspaper, profanity looks harmless, if not comical. "%$&+*$*(**!!!" In public, it's another matter. In particular, few would argue that profanity has any place in high schools. But on many high school athletic fields, you'll hear a "$%--*!!" here and a "?!* 5/8%!!" there, without any repercussions. In an era of political correctness, profanity's foothold in high school sports has all but escaped scrutiny. Although profanity is rarely approved of, it is often ignored.
IMAGE
January 6, 2008
Regarding "A Bleeping Part of the Job" [Dec. 16]: I am not a prude, but at 65 I have heard all the curse words, including during a stint in a frontline combat unit in the Army in Germany in the early '60s where some NCOs could not mouth a sentence without a few choice vulgarities. In junior high school an English teacher asked several of us to read "The Naked and the Dead" by Norman Mailer. I remember asking Mrs. Stevens what the word "fug" meant, and she said it was a replacement for a vulgar four-letter word also starting with "F."
NEWS
September 4, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
James Franco's history with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is an infamous one: During his 2011 Oscar co-hosting stint with Anne Hathaway, the actor's low-key demeanor seemed more appropriate for a backyard barbecue than an entertainment event watched by 40 million people. Now Franco, who was also nominated for an Oscar that year for his performance in "127 Hours," is giving academy members another reason to shake their heads -- an irreverent awards campaign for his raunchy arthouse hit "Spring Breakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By David Ng
Not surprisingly, Ai Weiwei's new music video features wall-to-wall profanity and an aggressive anger aimed at China's ruling Communist party. The celebrated Chinese artist has released a new heavy-metal music video about the 81 days he spent in prison after being arrested by Chinese authorities in 2011. The single, titled "Dumbass," is a Mandarin-language diatribe filled with expletives. It also features the artist's trademark mix of dry humor, media commentary and self-mythology.
WORLD
March 15, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
BUENOS AIRES - For the last two days here “it's been all pope, everything pope. In the streets, in the cafes, on the corners, everyone's talking about the pope,” said Fernando Vignoles, a thirtysomething cab driver and longtime resident of Argentina's capital. From the freeway late Thursday night, Vignoles proudly pointed into the darkness to the outline of a handsome old church where the man now known as Pope Francis, the former archbishop of Buenos Aires, had presided over his confirmation ceremony as a young man. “He's a good guy, a really good guy,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Erin Aubry Kaplan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tracey White's initial impression of "Django Unchained," Quentin Tarantino's new slave-era shoot-'em-up extravaganza, could be summed up in three words: smart, funny and ugly. Sitting through a recent screening in Beverly Hills, the L.A. costume designer was mostly absorbed and found herself laughing aloud at particularly outrageous moments. But White, who is black, said her feelings evolved significantly. Two days after reflecting on the matter of slavery and Tarantino's treatment, she pronounced the movie mostly ugly.
SPORTS
December 26, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Once again Twitter has helped an athlete get himself in trouble. This time it's Cleveland Browns return man Josh Cribbs. Cribbs fumbled a punt during Sunday's 34-12 loss to Denver, and when he checked his Twitter account later he found he was the recipient of several tweets from fans criticizing his lackluster play in the game. He responded: “See all the negativity on twitter after I gave my life to this,” then offered a profane suggestion to “all u who are against me.”  Cribbs apologized Wednesday, saying he was more mad at himself than anyone else, and that he realizes true Browns fans would not try to criticize him like that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | By Wesley Lowery
Los Angeles Times Pedro Espinoza took pride in his gang affiliation. The 18th Street gang member, with slick black hair and tattoos on his neck and arms, once bragged to a parole supervisor that he aspired to land on death row for his allegiance, prosecutors said. On Friday afternoon, Espinoza was granted his wish. The 23-year-old was sentenced to death for the 2008 murder of Jamiel Shaw II, a standout football prospect for Los Angeles High School who was killed as he walked home from a friend's house.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest debt-collection companies will face federal regulatory exams for the first time, starting in January, to determine if they are complying with consumer protection laws. Among the laws that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau would enforce would be ones that require employees to identify themselves properly and that prohibit the use of "obscene or profane language" in collecting overdue bills. The new oversight comes as the bureau, which was created by the 2010 financial reform law, continues to expand its authority beyond banks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Tom Hanks detonated an F-bomb on “Good Morning, America.” He clapped his hand over his mouth and apologized all over the place, as did interviewer Elizabeth Vargas. The actor subsequently tweeted: “For GMA, spesh kowtow for Lizzie V for WHAT DID I JUST SAY??? Oops! In character! Sorry! Hanx” The comment had watchdogs doing what they do best: barking. The Parents Television Council was quick to speak up, as the Los Angeles Times reported, saying ABC had “allowed the harshest profanity to be broadcast into every living room and breakfast table in the country.” Shame on Tom Hanks?
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