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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1999 | RICHARD E. LAPCHICK, Richard E. Lapchick is the director of Northeastern University's Center for the Study of Sport in Society
Everyone is trying to make sense out of the nightmare in Littleton, Colo., as the grief has touched the community, the state and the entire nation. As we grieve, fingers are pointing every which way: parents, hate, groups, guns, teachers, fellow students, TV, movies, music and the Internet. It was reported that the shooters targeted minorities and athletes. I am 53 years old and have been around sports since the day I was born.
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NEWS
May 3, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
The horizon is full now, a sleek number 23 and a quick number 99 joined by a stocky No. 7. Jordan, Gretzky and Elway. Into the shadows they step, together, too soon, a loss too high to calculate, a sight almost too much to bear. A sports era of character and virtue appropriately ended in weeping and gratitude Sunday when football's John Elway officially retired less than four months after the retirements of basketball's Michael Jordan and hockey's Wayne Gretzky.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | HELENE ELLIOTT
TEAM RECORD: COMMENT 1. Dallas (51-19-12): But are Stars ready for real season? 2. Colorado (44-28-10): Fast finish of 9-2-1. 3. New Jersey (47-24-11): Loosened reins do the trick. 4. Detroit (43-32-7): A-one, and a-two, and a-three . . . 5. Ottawa (44-23-15): Late 1-2-4 slide costly. 6. Toronto (45-30-7): Surprise top-scoring team. 7. Boston (39-30-13): Solid defense, goaltending. 8. St. Louis (37-32-13): 11-4-3 in final five weeks. 9. Philadelphia (37-26-19): Held together with spit and tape.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Every once in a while, a personality in the public eye gets under the public skin. Something about his (or her) attitude, appearance, ethical boundaries or ethnic background is so provocative, it makes others intolerant, no matter what this individual's skill might be. It can be a Jerry Lee Lewis wedding and bedding a cousin or the conscientious objection and proselytization of a Muhammad Ali; you never know.
SPORTS
February 21, 1999 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top three things that make sports journalists squirm: 3) Chit-chat on deadline in a press box. 2) An urgent message to "call the office." 1) An athlete talking about religion. Nothing triggers writers' cramp faster than the juxtaposition of deadline, locker stall, born-again shortstop and a reading from Ecclesiastes.
SPORTS
February 21, 1999 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Golfer: "I'd move heaven and earth to be able to break 100 on this course." Caddie: "Try heaven. You've already moved most of the earth." * Baseball belongs to the Babe, hoops to Jordan, boxing to Ali. But golf, clearly, is God's sport. If you think not, try reciting a tennis joke that begins "Jesus, Moses, a priest and a rabbi met at center court. . . ." There is something about golf--a man, a ball, a patch of grass, the banshee cries of "Fore!"--that makes it uniquely otherworldly.
SPORTS
February 21, 1999 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Safe to say that wasn't the kind of "action" the religious group "Athletes in Action" had in mind Super Bowl week when it bestowed the Bart Starr Award to Atlanta Falcon safety Eugene Robinson. Hours after receiving the honor, presented to the NFL player who exhibits high moral character, Robinson was arrested in Miami on charges of soliciting sex from an undercover police officer.
SPORTS
February 18, 1999 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manufacturers of golf equipment are constantly trying to come up with cool, new stuff to help you shoot lower scores. OK, so what they're really trying to do is make things you think will help you improve your game so you'll empty your wallet hoping they'll do just that.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | JIM HODGES
Babe Ruth, pitcher-outfielder, Boston (AL), New York (AL), Boston (NL), 1914-1935--As an overweight 40-year-old in 1935, he batted .181 for the Boston Braves, with six homers in 28 games. Still, there was a wisp of greatness remaining, when on May 25 he hit three homers in a game, becoming the first batter to do so in both leagues. Less than two weeks later, he retired.
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