Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsProfessional Misconduct
IN THE NEWS

Professional Misconduct

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1997 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Erik and Lyle Menendez's Beverly Hills therapist, who heard them confess to killing their parents and then became a key witness in the first of the brothers' two murder trials, was stripped of his psychology license Friday. L. Jerome Oziel, who had been accused by a state panel of breaking confidentiality rules and having sex with female patients, surrendered his license to the state Department of Consumer Affairs' Board of Psychology. In a deal that was agreed to Sept.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
GEORGETOWN, Texas - In emotional testimony Monday, a Texas man told a judge how it felt spending 25 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. “Brutal,” Michael Morton said. “But after a couple decades, I got used to it.” Morton, 58, who grew up in Los Angeles, was convicted in the 1986 beating death of his wife, Christine, at their home. He was exonerated and released almost a year and a half ago after DNA tests confirmed his innocence. Another man has since been charged in connection with the killing.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 15, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a popular teacher, known for working past midnight on school projects and being a compassionate ally to her students. He was one of the special ones: a sixth-grader with whom she had recognized a kindred spirit when he entered her class, talented and intense.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon inspector general has cleared the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan of allegations that he sent inappropriate emails to a Florida woman who was also involved in the scandal that led to CIA Director David H. Petraeus' resignation. The inspector general determined that Marine Gen. John R. Allen's emails to Jill Kelley, a married Tampa socialite with close ties to several senior military officers, did not constitute professional misconduct, a spokeswoman for the office said.
SPORTS
January 20, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sprinter who became one of Finland's most revered sports heroes on Tuesday resigned her post on the International Olympic Committee, the first IOC member toppled by the bribery scandal roiling the Olympic movement. Pirjo Haggman, 47, one of the first women to become an IOC member and a track champion so beloved in Finland that she has been depicted on a postage stamp, delivered her resignation to IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch in Lausanne, Switzerland.
NEWS
August 24, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Navy psychiatrist who formerly directed the drug and alcohol rehabilitation unit at Camp Pendleton faces a general court-martial today on a range of charges, including larceny, attempted sodomy and sexual harassment of clients and co-workers. The controversy swirling around Cmdr. William J.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Months had passed, and still Rick Crowl couldn't purge images of the Lehmer baby from his mind. There'd been no obvious wounds on the 3-month-old, nothing you could see. No signs of massive trauma; no signs of any trauma. No skull fracture, no collarbone bruises, no head injuries, no bleeding in the eyes, no gross bleeding under the scalp. Yet Thomas Bennett, the state medical examiner, had diagnosed shaken-slammed baby syndrome. Thomas Bennett had called Jonathan's death a homicide.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not one to seek refuge in clunky medical jargon, psychiatrist William Vicary has always talked of his patients in the most evocative way. He called a convicted killer "a very sick lady with one foot on a banana peel and the other in the gas chamber." He described a teenage murder suspect as "an accident waiting to happen." He deemed Erik Menendez "so sick it was almost time to take him upstairs and put him in the rubber room."
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sportscaster Marv Albert's sexual assault trial, which was replete with kinky details of lurid assignations in hotel rooms, came to an abrupt end Thursday when the flamboyant announcer pleaded guilty to assault and battery and was promptly fired by NBC. In exchange for a guilty plea on the misdemeanor assault charge, prosecutors in Arlington, Va., dropped a more serious forcible sodomy charge. Albert, who became known as the "Yesss!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2012 | Catherine Saillant
A high-profile perjury and voter fraud case against Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon and his wife could be in trouble based on a judge's warning at a court hearing last month, transcripts show. In the March 2 hearing, L.A. County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy sharply criticized the prosecution's case and scolded Deputy Dist. Atty. Jennifer Lentz Snyder for being "very dismissive" of defense evidence submitted to a grand jury in 2010. Those jurors returned a 24-count felony indictment against the Alarcons, who have pleaded not guilty.
WORLD
January 17, 2012 | Sarah Delaney
Hope of finding survivors on the half-submerged Costa Concordia waned Monday after rescuers found a sixth victim, three days after the giant luxury liner ran aground off the Italian coast in an accident that increasingly appeared to have been avoidable. Both judicial and media attention was concentrated Monday on ascertaining what led to the tragedy that one prosecutor said was due to an "inexcusable" maneuver by the ship's captain, who remained in custody. The sixth victim was a still-unidentified male passenger who was found on the second bridge of the ship wearing a life jacket.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2010 | Washington Post
The White House nominee to lead the Transportation Security Administration gave Congress misleading information about incidents in which he inappropriately accessed a federal database, possibly in violation of privacy laws, documents obtained by the Washington Post show. The disclosure comes as pressure builds from Democrats on Capitol Hill for a quick January confirmation of Erroll Southers, whose nomination has been held up by GOP opponents. In the aftermath of an attempted airline bombing on Christmas Day, calls have intensified for lawmakers to install permanent leadership at the TSA, a crucial agency in enforcing airline security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2009 | By Harriet Ryan
A state appellate court Monday rejected Roman Polanski's bid to have his 1977 child-sex prosecution dismissed but outlined a way that could end the long-running case without Polanski serving more time behind bars or returning to the American justice system he fled three decades ago. In a 3-0 ruling, the 2nd District Court of Appeal suggested that Polanski ask to be sentenced in absentia for the statutory rape he admitted committing 32 years ago....
SPORTS
December 3, 2009 | By Chris Foster
A day after former USC basketball coach Tim Floyd had his say -- when he denied allegations of breaking NCAA rules and complained that Trojans Athletic Director Mike Garrett abandoned him -- USC and the NCAA declined to have theirs. A request to interview Garrett on Wednesday brought this response from USC spokesman Tim Tessalone: "Because there is an ongoing NCAA investigation, we cannot comment." In an interview with Times reporter Diane Pucin late Tuesday night, Floyd said that during his last six weeks as coach of the Trojans, Garrett communicated with him only through letters delivered by courier to his home or office.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2009 | Washington Post
Amid a firestorm of criticism, the community organizing group known as ACORN announced Wednesday that it would launch an independent review into "the indefensible action of a handful of our employees" who were secretly videotaped while giving advice to actors posing as a pimp and prostitute on how to buy a home and start a brothel. The announcement by Bertha Lewis, ACORN's chief executive, came on the day that her organization's actions were strongly condemned by White House spokesman Robert Gibbs and days after conservative members of Congress called for a complete cutoff of federal funding for the group.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | Associated Press
A pathologist acquitted in the mercy killing of his cancer-stricken wife agreed to give up his medical license rather than face a professional misconduct charge. The Florida Board of Medicine accepted Peter Rosier's license and an accompanying letter Friday without comment. Rosier, 52, could have contested the charge but his psychiatrist said Rosier realized he was not emotionally able to practice medicine.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
French bank Societe Generale fired an assistant to former trader Jerome Kerviel after a report indicated that Kerviel may have had assistance in amassing $78 billion in unauthorized futures positions. Thomas Mougard, 23, was fired for "professional misconduct," his lawyer said. Without naming Mougard, Societe Generale said in a report last week that as many as 15% of Kerviel's questionable trades were registered by his assistant.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
ABC News is being accused of checkbook journalism after landing the first sit-down interview with Joe Jackson following the recent death of his pop superstar son, Michael. Segments of a 45-minute interview with the Jackson family patriarch have already aired on ABC's "Nightline" and "Good Morning America," but the bulk of the interview will air tonight on the network as part of its summer series "Primetime Family Secrets." Mediabistro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2009 | Larry Gordon
In a case that triggered a national debate about academic freedom, a UC Santa Barbara investigation has cleared a sociology professor of improper conduct for e-mailing students images that compared Palestinian casualties of Israel's Gaza offensive this year to Jewish victims of the Holocaust. But professor William Robinson said Thursday he was not satisfied with faculty and administrative findings that he should not be disciplined. Robinson wants a campus apology and an investigation of what he said were improper efforts to silence him. In January, Robinson sent his class the images, along with a statement in which he described Israel's Gaza policy as slow-motion genocide.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|