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Professional Misconduct

NEWS
August 3, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some Southern California probate judges have been waging a quiet campaign to stamp out abuses by a small number of professional conservators--entrepreneurs who control the lives and estates of mostly elderly people unable to take care of their personal and financial affairs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2007 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Kaiser Permanente will be assessed a record fine today for its haphazard investigations of questionable care, physician performance and patient complaints at its California hospitals, according to state HMO regulators. The California Department of Managed Health Care said it will levy a $3-million fine against Kaiser, the largest HMO in the state, with 29 medical centers and more than 6 million members.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After office hours one Friday, Denver neurosurgeon Kenneth P. Burres piled his examination table, waiting room furniture and some medical records onto a truck and set out for California--abandoning his practice. It was 1987, and he was fleeing a host of problems: a medical board investigation of malpractice suits against him, and financial and marital woes. He slipped out of town without warning his physician partner, his staff or his patients, according to Colorado medical board records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending legal action by relatives whose family graves had been mishandled by a Santa Fe Springs cemetery, a court commissioner approved a $3.9-million settlement Thursday with about 40 mortuaries in the Los Angeles area. "The court made the right decision. I don't think anything can be done to improve the settlement amount received," said Mike Arias, one of the lead attorneys for the plaintiffs. But some of the families involved said they felt little sense of closure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates medical complaints and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles County physicians and surgeons who were subject to serious disciplinary actions between Feb. 1 and April 30, 2000, according to Medical Board documents. Generally final actions are published only after all appeals are exhausted. Dr.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to restore confidence in the state's much-criticized doctor discipline system, the executive director of the California Medical Board announced Friday that he has ordered a review of all recently closed cases that involve either a patient death or dismemberment or accusations that a physician engaged in sexual misconduct.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
GEORGETOWN, Texas - In emotional testimony Monday, a Texas man told a judge how it felt spending 25 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. “Brutal,” Michael Morton said. “But after a couple decades, I got used to it.” Morton, 58, who grew up in Los Angeles, was convicted in the 1986 beating death of his wife, Christine, at their home. He was exonerated and released almost a year and a half ago after DNA tests confirmed his innocence. Another man has since been charged in connection with the killing.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | from The Washington Post
Twenty Justice Department lawyers left their jobs while under investigation for charges of professional misconduct during the first year of the Clinton Administration, according to a department report. At the same time, allegations of misconduct by department lawyers and assistant U.S. attorneys rose 78% over the last year of the George Bush Administration, the department's Office of Professional Responsibility report shows.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a near-empty courtroom here, the biggest medical sexual-abuse case in California history came to an unexpectedly abrupt end on Tuesday. Dr. Ivan C. Namihas, a Tustin gynecologist accused of about 50 instances of alleged sexual abuse of his patients, declined to appear at his court hearing to defend himself, clearing the way for permanent revocation of his right to practice medicine in California.
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