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Professional Misconduct

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2009 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger replaced most members of the state Board of Registered Nursing on Monday, citing the unacceptable time it takes to discipline nurses accused of egregious misconduct. He fired three of six sitting board members -- including President Susanne Phillips -- in two-paragraph letters curtly thanking them for their service. Another member resigned Sunday. Late Monday, the governor's administration released a list of replacements.
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NATIONAL
February 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
GEORGETOWN, Texas - In emotional testimony Monday, a Texas man told a judge how it felt spending 25 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. “Brutal,” Michael Morton said. “But after a couple decades, I got used to it.” Morton, 58, who grew up in Los Angeles, was convicted in the 1986 beating death of his wife, Christine, at their home. He was exonerated and released almost a year and a half ago after DNA tests confirmed his innocence. Another man has since been charged in connection with the killing.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | from The Washington Post
Twenty Justice Department lawyers left their jobs while under investigation for charges of professional misconduct during the first year of the Clinton Administration, according to a department report. At the same time, allegations of misconduct by department lawyers and assistant U.S. attorneys rose 78% over the last year of the George Bush Administration, the department's Office of Professional Responsibility report shows.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
An internal Justice Department report released Friday has concluded that although two former Bush administration lawyers used "poor judgment" in issuing legal memos authorizing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics on terrorism suspects, they did not commit any professional misconduct. The report by the department's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that the lawyers did not purposely give bad legal advice to CIA interrogators and others dealing with suspects captured after the Sept.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a near-empty courtroom here, the biggest medical sexual-abuse case in California history came to an unexpectedly abrupt end on Tuesday. Dr. Ivan C. Namihas, a Tustin gynecologist accused of about 50 instances of alleged sexual abuse of his patients, declined to appear at his court hearing to defend himself, clearing the way for permanent revocation of his right to practice medicine in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2002
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates medical complaints and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Ventura County physicians and surgeons who were subject to serious disciplinary actions between Aug. 1 and Oct. 31, 2001, according to Medical Board documents.
SPORTS
October 9, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
The mixed martial arts world is abuzz by post-fight comments made by Seth Petruzelli, the little-known, last-minute replacement on CBS' national broadcast of Elite XC fights Saturday who needed only 14 seconds to knock out popular heavyweight Kimbo Slice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury has ordered a Santa Ana lawyer to pay $21 million to a woman who claimed that his faulty advice in business dealings left her destitute. Jurors returned the verdict Friday against Lee Durst, whose client accused him of negligently handling a lawsuit against a mortgage company and recklessly handling her and her husband's investment in a Kansas nightclub. Superior Court Judge James Selna is scheduled to review the verdict this morning.
SPORTS
August 24, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
It was the perfect metaphor for a perfectly awful situation: Paul Hamm, surrounded by boos he had not caused, standing in a limbo where he did not belong. An Olympic gold medal winner being treated as if he did not exist. It happened Monday night when Hamm followed Russian star Alexei Nemov in the individual high bar finals. Thousands of fans, angered at the score given Nemov, and perhaps fueled by the controversy over Hamm's all-around gold medal from last week, booed for 8 1/2 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Travel-trailer magnate Johnnie R. Crean was a roughhewn candidate for Congress who was so unpalatable that after winning the Republican nomination in 1982, GOP activists successfully backed a write-in candidate. Today, Crean is under fire again, this time from parents and faculty revolting against his 10-year chairmanship of the Army and Navy Academy in Carlsbad, California's only private military boarding school.
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