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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
The first day of school, one of America's great communal experiences. Pencils are sharpened, backpacks bought and outfits laid out, found to be totally lame, OMG, and laid out again. But what today's kids in Los Angeles public schools will experience on Days 2 through 180 is significantly different from what their parents enjoyed when it comes to music, art, drama and field trips. For a variety of reasons, funds available to school boards for education in California have been devastated over the last 20 years, to levels some in the industry call the worst in U.S. history.
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SPORTS
February 4, 1987 | TOM HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Fewer scholarships each year for NCAA Division I football programs may mean more quality athletes in the Western Athletic Conference and the Pacific Coast Athletic Assn. Delegates to the NCAA Convention in San Diego voted last month to reduce football scholarships from 30 to 25 in any given year. Basketball scholarships were cut from 15 to 13 for Division I schools. Both rules go into effect Aug. 1, 1988. "I think the new rule will help us," said Gene Murphy, Cal State Fullerton football coach.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Veritas Software Corp. agreed to pay a total of $599 million for two companies whose programs help computers and applications perform more efficiently, to expand beyond products that protect data. The company will pay $537 million for Israel-based Precise Software Solutions Ltd., whose software spots potential system failures, and $62 million for closely held Jareva Technologies, a Sunnyvale, Calif., maker of programs that automate management of server computers. Shares of Mountain View, Calif.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Barbara Bronson Gray is a regular contributor to Valley Life
Our society supports people more in death than in life, at least when it comes to divorce, says Christine Archambault, founder of Divorce Anonymous. "Nobody brings you a casserole. Family members take sides; there's no closing ritual--like a funeral--and sometimes very little assistance," says Archambault, who is also co-author of Divorce Recovery (Bantam, $4.50). But there are a range of groups committed to helping people navigate the emotional and legal hurdles that often accompany divorce.
OPINION
August 22, 2013
Re “Egypt in the rearview mirror,” opinion, Aug. 20 Thank you, Andrew J. Bacevich, for your concise and insightful article on U.S. aid to the Middle East. Such a true statement when Bacevich writes: “Rather than furthering the cause of mutual understanding - funding education programs or cultural exchanges, for example - most of that money has gone to the purchase of advanced weaponry.” One has to ask our leaders, what were you thinking? Carole Jentink Glendale Bacevich speciously posits the false options that the U.S. can either spend money on bad foreign military aid programs abroad or on good economic programs here at home.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1989
March Kessler has been named senior vice president-current programs at Lorimar Television, Culver City. She had been vice president-current programs.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Jon Healey
A headline Monday in Politics Now, the L.A. Times' blog on national politics, distilled the challenge facing Rep. Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) as he tries to broaden his party's appeal. The story by Lisa Mascaro was about a report the House Budget Committee (which Ryan chairs) released Monday on Washington's "duplicative and complex" array of benefits for the poor. Declared the headline: "Paul Ryan calls for cuts to anti-poverty programs. " The report didn't actually call for cuts, however.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1985 | DJ
Cost Engineering Research Inc. won a $5.8-million Navy contract for engineering work on sonar programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The corner of 4th and Gless streets in East Los Angeles, once a center of prostitution and drugs, now houses a place of soaring dreams. Inside the gleaming Boyle Heights Technology Youth Center, a classroom of young people battered by hard luck or bad choices is filled with quiet, focused energy. Marcos Avila, a 19-year-old who was kicked out of high school for fighting, is learning to compare and contrast two essays. Vincent Guzman, 18, who left school after his brother was killed in a drive-by shooting, is puzzling over two-step algebraic problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | PRICE FISHBACK and SHAWN KANTOR, Price Fishback and Shawn Kantor are professors of economics at the University of Arizona
With the hodgepodge of programs proposed to alleviate the current recession, it is worthwhile to look back to the time in U.S. history when the federal government first stepped in with massive stimulus programs: the New Deal.
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