Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsProhibition
IN THE NEWS

Prohibition

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011
'Prohibition' Where: KOCE When: Part 1, 8 and 9:45 p.m. Sunday; Part 2, 8 and 10 p.m. Monday; Part 3, 8 and 10 p.m. Tuesday. Rating: TV-PG (may be unsuitable for young children)
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
"Supreme Court rules against affirmative action. " That is likely to be a common shorthand description of Tuesday's decision upholding the constitutionality of Michigan's ban on the use of racial preferences in admission to state universities. But it's misleading. The 6-2 decision leaves undisturbed previous rulings in which the justices said that state universities may take race into account in admissions policies without violating the U.S. Constitution. But the court now has made it clear that although such preferences are permissible, voters may opt to prohibit them.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Matt Ballinger
Prohibition ended 80 years ago Thursday. The top headlines on the Los Angeles Times' front page conveyed the news: " Dry Era End Proclaimed on Utah's Ratification: Roosevelt Calls on Nation to Ban Bootlegger and Saloon's Return; Huge Liquor Imports Authorized" "Rum Flows in Quietly: Repeal Hailed in Sane Style" My favorite tidbit from the main story involves when and how President Franklin Roosevelt signed a proclamation about the...
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court next week will consider for the first time whether states may enforce laws that make it a crime to knowingly publish false statements about political candidates. The justices will hear an antiabortion group's free-speech challenge to an Ohio law that was invoked in 2010 by then-Rep. Steve Driehaus, a Democrat. He had voted for President Obama's healthcare law and was facing a tough race for reelection. The antiabortion group Susan B. Anthony List launched a campaign to unseat Driehaus, preparing to run billboard ads saying, "Shame on Steve Driehaus!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
Ken Burns opened the tap and poured some big ratings for the first night of his PBS documentary "Prohibition. " The first episode Sunday night averaged 3.9-million viewers, according to Nielsen. PBS estimated that at least 7.6-million viewers saw at least six minutes of the first installment of the three-part, 5½-hour program. Those are giant figures by PBS' usual standards, reflecting the power of Burns to draw a large audience. But they are small by commercial broadcast yardsticks and also lower than for some of the filmmaker's past multi-part projects.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
I know that Prohibition didn't work. But sometimes I get nostalgic for it anyway. And I'm thinking that, today, Reese Witherspoon and Al Michaels might agree. By now you've seen the headlines about their misadventures with demon rum. If you're a news junkie, you might even have read the stories. If you're under 30, you've checked out the tweets -- which, I'm told, is just as good if not better than reading whole stories, like us old fogies do. (An aside here: Did you catch the wonderful documentary about “ All the President's Men ” and Watergate on Sunday?
OPINION
January 12, 2009
Re "Looking for crime's smoking gun," Opinion, Jan. 8 I find it amazing that a renowned crime researcher could mention the decrease in crime in the 1930s over the 1920s without acknowledging one obvious reason: the repeal of Prohibition. Once the ban on alcohol was repealed, millions of Americans who wanted to drink no longer had to patronize criminals, and thousands who wanted to make and sell alcoholic beverages no longer had to break the law. As a result, turf wars between alcohol enterprises could be fought in the courts instead of in the streets with guns, and by taxing alcohol, the government could raise money to pay for the social costs of its use. It's a lesson James Q. Wilson should be acknowledging so his committee could consider whether lifting today's similarly misguided laws against recreational drugs might help solve the gang problem by cutting off their main source of income.
REAL ESTATE
September 13, 1987
A bill to permanently ban commercial rent control in California has been approved by both houses of the Legislature and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian. SB 692 provides for a statewide prohibition against imposition of rent controls on any type of commercial (non-residential) property.
OPINION
October 9, 2011
Time for a change Re "Neither high nor dry," Opinion, Oct. 5 Kevin A. Sabet argues that the country's disastrous experience with alcohol prohibition does not stand as an example of why the war on drugs must change. He misses a very basic point. The reason Prohibition didn't work and why the laws against drugs don't work is the same: People's desire to alter their consciousness, whether through alcohol or what are classified as "drugs," will not go away simply because of a law. In a country where individual freedom is cherished above virtually everything else, it is time to do away with the draconian drug laws that violate our freedom to make choices in our lives, even when the choices are bad ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
It's fall on PBS, when the big documentary blockbusters heave into view; and nobody builds them bigger than Ken Burns, whose name always seems to be part of the title, even when it isn't: "Ken Burns' Baseball," "Ken Burns' Jazz," "Ken Burns' Civil War. " Burns likes to swallow huge subjects whole -- American subjects -- and this year he brings us "Prohibition," the story of the 14-year misrule of the 18th Amendment and of the decades-long temperance movement...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Matt Stevens and Martha Groves
Skating fans in Culver City were celebrating a temporary victory after city officials dug out an obscure document that advocates hope can keep an ice rink in the neighborhood. City officials informed the owner of Culver City Ice Arena of its findings last week. They said a use variance granted in 1960 prohibits the use of the property for anything except an ice rink. The new lessee, Planet Granite, plans to convert the 52-year-old rink into a rock climbing, fitness and yoga facility.
OPINION
January 31, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A California law that prohibits therapists from trying to change the sexual orientation of children and adolescents survived another legal challenge this week. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals announced that an earlier decision by a three-judge panel upholding the law wouldn't be reconsidered by a larger group of 11 judges. That was the correct decision. But a judge who believes the law should be reconsidered on free-speech grounds raised an important question in his dissenting opinion.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2014 | By Dahleen Glanton and Jason Meisner
CHICAGO - A federal judge Monday stripped away a key element of Chicago's gun ordinance, ruling that it was unconstitutional to prohibit licensed gun stores from operating in the city. U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang said Chicago had failed to persuade him that banning the sale of guns by licensed dealers was necessary to reduce gun violence that has plagued the city. The ruling also would make it legal for individuals to transfer ownership of firearms as gifts or in private sales as long as the recipients were over 18 and had state firearm owner identification cards.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Pascal Tessier, 17, had aspired to rise to the rank of Eagle Scout since he was in the sixth grade. "It shows to everyone that I'm a capable person - that I'm worth something," said Tessier, of Kensington, Md. He knew it would be an arduous process to achieve Scouting's highest honor: earn 21 merit badges, play a leadership role in the troop, complete a service project and undergo a board of review. Tessier also knew there was one requirement that he could never meet: being straight.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Jim Puzzanghera and E. Scott Reckard
WASHINGTON - Government regulators approved a sweeping new set of rules for the nation's biggest banks that ban them from the kind of ultra-high-risk trading that nearly collapsed the world's financial system. Despite a fierce lobbying effort to prevent the new measure, five of the nation's top regulatory agencies on Tuesday approved the final version of a key component of the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul law. The so-called Volcker rule, named after former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, prohibits banks from trading for their own profit rather than on behalf of customers.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Matt Ballinger
Prohibition ended 80 years ago Thursday. The top headlines on the Los Angeles Times' front page conveyed the news: " Dry Era End Proclaimed on Utah's Ratification: Roosevelt Calls on Nation to Ban Bootlegger and Saloon's Return; Huge Liquor Imports Authorized" "Rum Flows in Quietly: Repeal Hailed in Sane Style" My favorite tidbit from the main story involves when and how President Franklin Roosevelt signed a proclamation about the...
NEWS
November 30, 1986 | DAVID TOMLIN, Associated Press
Glur's Tavern may be the oldest saloon west of the Missouri River, but it was during the dry days of Prohibition that the place took on the flavor that helped make it a national landmark. In the 1920s, when a tavern keeper couldn't sell anything stronger than root beer, Louis Glur introduced decks of cards, cribbage boards and slot machines with drink-token payoffs in a frantic effort to keep showing his sober customers a good time.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Old World architectural details take center stage at this Spanish Colonial Revival-style house in the Little Holmby area of Westwood. Elaborate ironwork, carved and stenciled beams and colorful tile, as well as a Prohibition-era bar hidden behind panels, are among original features. Location: 10571 Wyton Drive, Los Angeles 90024 Asking price: $2.895 million Year built: 1932 House size: Four bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 4,243 square feet Lot size: 10,649 square feet Features: Rotunda entry, French doors, wood-paneled library, breakfast room, vaulted ceilings, balcony, sleeping porch, outdoor dining loggia About the area: In the first half of the year, 42 single-family homes sold in the 90024 ZIP Code at a median price of $1.82 million, according to DataQuick.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Jazz babies and their beaus can relive the Roaring '20s in the Arizona Biltmore's Mystery Room, the newly re-created "secret" speak-easy in the resort's main building. The Arizona Biltmore opened in 1929 during Prohibition. But a desert resort with no hooch to satisfy the patrons' thirst? Unthinkable. The owners found a way with the Mystery Room, a.k.a. the Men's Smoker, up a staircase and hidden down a corridor. Here gentlemen could purchase a set-up for the bootleg liquor stashed in a cabinet that converted into a bookcase in case of a raid.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|