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Project Glass

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NATIONAL
April 6, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google's Project Glass made its public debut on the face of Google co-founder Sergey Brin on Thursday night, prompting new excitement about the project, fresh predictions of future marvels -- or horrors -- and inspiration, most likely, for new parodies of the funky, futuristic headset. In photos, Brin appears comfortable in the augmented-reality specs as he stands alongside tech guru Robert Scoble at a charity event in San Francisco. Interestingly, the event at which the futuristic eyewear made its first appearance was Dining in the Dark for the Foundation Fighting Blindness.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google glasses may still be on the fringes of mainstream consciousness. But they are not going to stay there very long. It's one of the longest and most anticipated product rollouts in recent memory (the $1,500 Internet-connected eyewear won't be widely available for months yet). And the product tease is working for Google Glass. Google co-founder Sergey Brin, the product's most famous beta tester, turned the product launch into performance art by introducing the world to Project Glass during a skydiving stunt last year at Google's annual developer conference in San Francisco.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple may be taking a page out of Google's book. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday awarded the Cupertino tech giant a patent for a wearable display device that certainly sounds, at the very least, similar to Google's Project Glass. As you likely have seen by now, Google co-founder Sergey Brin has been touting the company's computer glasses, going as far as putting together a huge spectacle last week, complete with bikers and skydivers, to announce that participants in the company's Google I/O conference could purchase a prototype of the project that will arrive early next year for $1,500.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has announced the dates for its 2013 developer conference, where the company typically announces new products and software. Google I/O 2013 is set to take place May 15-17. The Mountain View, Calif., company announced the news on its developer Google+ page , pointing out that the conference is 162 days away. The conference will be returning to San Francisco's Moscone Center West. That was also the headquarters for this year's conference. There, the company announced the Nexus 7 small-sized tablet and the unreleased Nexus Q media device, and also put together a skydiving stunt for Project Glass , the famed Google glasses.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has announced the dates for its 2013 developer conference, where the company typically announces new products and software. Google I/O 2013 is set to take place May 15-17. The Mountain View, Calif., company announced the news on its developer Google+ page , pointing out that the conference is 162 days away. The conference will be returning to San Francisco's Moscone Center West. That was also the headquarters for this year's conference. There, the company announced the Nexus 7 small-sized tablet and the unreleased Nexus Q media device, and also put together a skydiving stunt for Project Glass , the famed Google glasses.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google glasses may still be on the fringes of mainstream consciousness. But they are not going to stay there very long. It's one of the longest and most anticipated product rollouts in recent memory (the $1,500 Internet-connected eyewear won't be widely available for months yet). And the product tease is working for Google Glass. Google co-founder Sergey Brin, the product's most famous beta tester, turned the product launch into performance art by introducing the world to Project Glass during a skydiving stunt last year at Google's annual developer conference in San Francisco.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google has asked for feedback about its concept-stage augmented-reality specs Project Glass.  And the company is getting it. Much of it is admiring; some of it is definitely not. Henry Blodget of Business Times tweeted of the headgear: "Ridiculous toy that shows Google is rapidly becoming Microsoft. " "Has anyone asked Google whether the Project Glass video post-production simply missed a deadline of April 1?" (David Chartier). The Glass eyewear would project info graphics in pop-ups on a small screen a few inches from the wearer's right eye.  The gear might incorporate motion-sensing capability, GPS location services, 3G or 4G wireless connections and Google Goggles' augmented-reality software.  Or it might not. It's all apparently very much up in the air -- the unveiling of the project Wednesday made it clear that this was an effort to find out what people thought and what they wanted.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google 's Project Glass -- the newly unveiled concept headgear that would superimpose graphics on your view of the world -- immediately made me think of Steve Martin's glasses in "The Jerk. " The ones that made him cross-eyed. With the new augmented-reality headgear, cool graphics pop up on a small screen a few inches from your right eye. Would those of us 40 and older have problems refocusing ? Honestly, just thinking about it makes my head hurt. But it's early yet. Perhaps the middle-aged can request built-in progressive lenses -- the virtual suggestion box, after all, is open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the largest housing development in Los Angeles County history moves toward a final vote, an old California problem remains the major unresolved issue: water. Many of those initially opposed to Newhall Land & Farming Co.'s proposed planned community in the Santa Clarita Valley said negotiations have nearly resolved their concerns.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Google Play store will now sell movies, TV shows and magazine subscriptions, Google announced Wednesday. This is important news for any Android users but it was overshadowed by other major Google announcements from its Google I/O keynote, especially since the announcement was basically used as a gap filler between the introduction of Jelly Bean and the unveiling of the Nexus 7 tablet. TV shows and magazine subscriptions are brand new additions to Google Play. Movies were previously available on the digital Google store but they could only be rented.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple may be taking a page out of Google's book. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday awarded the Cupertino tech giant a patent for a wearable display device that certainly sounds, at the very least, similar to Google's Project Glass. As you likely have seen by now, Google co-founder Sergey Brin has been touting the company's computer glasses, going as far as putting together a huge spectacle last week, complete with bikers and skydivers, to announce that participants in the company's Google I/O conference could purchase a prototype of the project that will arrive early next year for $1,500.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google's Project Glass made its public debut on the face of Google co-founder Sergey Brin on Thursday night, prompting new excitement about the project, fresh predictions of future marvels -- or horrors -- and inspiration, most likely, for new parodies of the funky, futuristic headset. In photos, Brin appears comfortable in the augmented-reality specs as he stands alongside tech guru Robert Scoble at a charity event in San Francisco. Interestingly, the event at which the futuristic eyewear made its first appearance was Dining in the Dark for the Foundation Fighting Blindness.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google has asked for feedback about its concept-stage augmented-reality specs Project Glass.  And the company is getting it. Much of it is admiring; some of it is definitely not. Henry Blodget of Business Times tweeted of the headgear: "Ridiculous toy that shows Google is rapidly becoming Microsoft. " "Has anyone asked Google whether the Project Glass video post-production simply missed a deadline of April 1?" (David Chartier). The Glass eyewear would project info graphics in pop-ups on a small screen a few inches from the wearer's right eye.  The gear might incorporate motion-sensing capability, GPS location services, 3G or 4G wireless connections and Google Goggles' augmented-reality software.  Or it might not. It's all apparently very much up in the air -- the unveiling of the project Wednesday made it clear that this was an effort to find out what people thought and what they wanted.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google 's Project Glass -- the newly unveiled concept headgear that would superimpose graphics on your view of the world -- immediately made me think of Steve Martin's glasses in "The Jerk. " The ones that made him cross-eyed. With the new augmented-reality headgear, cool graphics pop up on a small screen a few inches from your right eye. Would those of us 40 and older have problems refocusing ? Honestly, just thinking about it makes my head hurt. But it's early yet. Perhaps the middle-aged can request built-in progressive lenses -- the virtual suggestion box, after all, is open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the largest housing development in Los Angeles County history moves toward a final vote, an old California problem remains the major unresolved issue: water. Many of those initially opposed to Newhall Land & Farming Co.'s proposed planned community in the Santa Clarita Valley said negotiations have nearly resolved their concerns.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Has your 4-year-old contribution to an anti-gay marriage law suddenly resurfaced on the Internet? Then you know exactly what Brendan Eich, co-founder of Mozilla, inventor of JavaScript, and general developer hero, is going through when it recently came to light that back in 2008, he made a $1,000 contribution to support Proposition 8 . The record of the donation has been available since at least 2008, but it was rediscovered by the...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By David Sarno
If you're one of the millions of new players of the addictive online Pictionary-like game Draw Something (which earned its maker, OMGPOP, a $180-million payday from buyer Zynga), you know there's one thing that Draw Something players can't seem to erase: cheating. For those who haven't played, the game mechanics are simple. You, the artist, are given a palette of colors and a word to draw out with your finger. The object is to get your opponent to guess it correctly. If she does, you both get play money that can be used to buy in-game stuff like new paint colors and brush shapes.
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