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SPORTS
November 23, 1986 | BILL BRUBAKER, The Washington Post
These have been trying times for A. Lee Fentress, a globe-trotting 45-year-old lawyer who co-founded Advantage International Inc., a 3 1/2-year-old Washington-based sports management firm that represents more than 150 athletes from nine offices on four continents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Christoland, the countdown had reached Day 138. That many days remained before the flowering at Gorman of the latest gigantic environmental sculpture by the artist Christo. Toiling on it on a sunny Thursday not long ago were workers in offices, factories, classrooms, rice fields and on mountainsides. They were in Tokyo, Toronto, San Diego, Ft. Worth, Bakersfield, the German city of Bayreuth, the little Japanese town of Hitachi-ota and on the Grapevine along Interstate 5.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | TED THACKREY Jr., Times Staff Writer
Auto magnate Henry Ford II, who for 35 years ran the automobile company founded by his grandfather, managing it from the brink of disaster to the top rank of industrial power, died Tuesday in a Detroit hospital. Ford, 70, who had a history of heart problems, was admitted to Cottage Hospital in suburban Grosse Pointe Farms on Sept. 9 for treatment of pneumonia he contracted while living at his country estate outside London. He was transferred Sept.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking back now, Daniel Hernandez says he has a few regrets. But, then again, too few to mention. One month after he and his wife, an Orange County society couple, were arrested in connection with the disappearance of nearly $8 million from a Santa Fe Springs precious-metals firm, Hernandez wished only that he had hidden the money better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost two weeks, jurors in the retrial of the Menendez brothers have been focusing on the bloody details of parricide, replayed shot by shot and larger than life. It has been grim work. They have heard the chilling, metallic clicks of a 12-gauge Mossberg shotgun similar to the alleged murder weapons; they have seen the blood-encrusted polo shirt Jose Menendez wore when he died. And countless autopsy photos have been projected on a courtroom screen.
SPORTS
February 24, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
Floyd Mayweather Jr. gave himself a 37 th birthday present Monday, confirming he'll collect another multimillion-dollar purse by selecting Marcos Maidana as his May 3 opponent. Mayweather (45-0, 26 knockouts) will defend his World Boxing Council welterweight title on Showtime pay-per-view at a site to be determined, either MGM Grand or Brooklyn's Barclays Center. "I am extremely happy to be facing Floyd Mayweather because it will give me the opportunity to show the world that I am the best welterweight in the division," said Maidana, who will represent throngs of Latino boxing fans on Cinco de Mayo when he faces the pound-for-pound king.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000 | DAVE CARPENTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It crushes the competition on sidelines, finish lines and checkout lines. Its name is as synonymous with sports drinks as Kleenex is with tissues and Frisbee with flying discs. Long the thirst-quencher of choice for jocks and other heavy sweaters, Gatorade has become a powerhouse product in supermarkets and convenience stores. It has only one real rival. "The biggest enemy is tap water," pronounced Robert S. Morrison, chief of Gatorade's parent, Quaker Oats Co., during a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1994 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a mistrial has been declared in the Erik Menendez murder case and jury deliberations are continuing in the trial of his brother Lyle, both CBS and Fox are proceeding with projects based on the sensationalized Beverly Hills killings of their parents, Jose and Kitty Menendez. "It is incumbent on us to be very circumspect about what we say and where we put the emphasis," said Zev Braun, producer of a four-hour miniseries for CBS, targeted to air during the May ratings sweeps.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the nation's largest-ever trademark infringement award, a Los Angeles jury Tuesday ordered pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc. to pay a British company $143 million for stealing the Trovan name to market its controversial antibiotic. Legal experts called the verdict "staggering," saying it raises the stakes for companies that deliberately infringe other companies' trademarks. Jurors said Pfizer, the second-largest U.S.
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