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NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | MICHELLE MUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON -- A yearlong investigation into whether Clinton administration aides left the White House in fraternity-party disarray as they vacated the presidential premises has turned up about $15,000 in damage, according to a government report released Tuesday. Rep. Bob Barr (R-Ga.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2009 | By Bob Pool
Nancy Gjerset was finished sifting through the ashes for the day when the young woman stopped on Big Tujunga Canyon Road and offered a strange compliment. "She said, 'I hope you'll forgive me, but this is absolutely stunning,' " Gjerset recalled. That is hardly the way Gjerset looks at the ghostly, blackened trees around her and at the ghastly, charred foundation of her home of nearly 40 years that lies at her feet. The house burned to the ground Aug. 29. It was one of about 90 dwellings destroyed by the Station fire, the massive wildfire that killed two county firefighters and burned 250 square miles of Angeles National Forest.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether clipped into lollipop shape or allowed to spread thick evergreen canopies, ficus trees have transformed the look of Southern California cities from San Diego to San Luis Obispo. They also have garnered great affection and, more recently, blossoming antagonism. Hailed as a miracle tree able to thrive under tough urban conditions, two ficus varieties commonly called "Indian laurel fig" were planted in enormous numbers throughout Southern California in the late '50s and early '60s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after they moved into their hilltop dream home in Laguna Niguel, Steven and Sue Guenther were flabbergasted to see their new neighbors waving picket signs and warning home shoppers of faulty construction by developers. Fretting over their new $270,000 investment in the latest phase of the Kite Hill subdivision, the Guenthers went to a project salesman to ask what was wrong. Just a crack in a swimming pool, they were assured. That was nearly 10 years ago.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | from Associated Press
Tornadoes skipped through the Dallas area on Sunday, striking and shutting down a hospital, destroying homes and killing at least one person. At least 60 others were injured. Tornadoes touched down in Wylie, Sachse, Terrell, Forney and Lake Lavon in northeast Texas, the National Weather Service said. Hardest hit was Wylie, 25 miles northeast of Dallas, where the tornado cut through the town's business center and hit Physicians Regional Hospital.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 1, 1988, scores of Los Angeles police officers descended on two apartment buildings on the corner of 39th Street and Dalton Avenue in southwest Los Angeles. It was an all-out search for drugs and a massive show of force designed to deliver a strong message to the gangs.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | Associated Press
An earthquake measured at 3.2 on the Richter scale jolted the three-state corner of Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia on Tuesday. Residents reported minor property damage but no injuries, authorities said.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | Associated Press
Insured property damage caused by Hurricane Jerry earlier this month is estimated at $35 million, the American Insurance Services Group reported Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2005 | Dan Weikel, Christine Hanley and Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writers
A landslide that sent multimillion-dollar homes crashing down a hill Wednesday in Laguna Beach was apparently a delayed consequence of last winter's heavy rains in Southern California, and could foreshadow more devastation to come, authorities said. No deaths or serious injuries were blamed on the slide, which announced itself with a bang just before 7 a.m., and sheared away part of the face of Laguna's scenic Bluebird Canyon.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
Engineers on Tuesday sifted through the debris of what had been billed as the world's tallest sign, trying to determine why the $4-million structure crumpled during a vicious storm. The top quarter of the 362-foot-tall sign atop the Las Vegas Hilton came crashing to the ground Monday night as winds of 78 m.p.h. raked the Las Vegas Valley. The marquee was designed to withstand winds of 130 m.p.h., a spokeswoman for the builder said.
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