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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996
As a retired person and homeowner living on a modest pension I recently voted against all propositions (A-AA-BB) which when passed would result in raising my property taxes in the form of assessments. I realize that taxes are necessary to provide the community with a quality of life that we may enjoy, but why always target the property owners? I find an increase in the sales tax and state gasoline tax would be a fair way to increase revenue. This way, everyone in California would be taxed, including the millions of tourists that visit here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | Andrew Khouri
Arie Shashou remembers simple pleasures from the decades spent in his Westside home: helping neighbors with small tasks; the daily chats with the former manager of the complex; the paintings that line the walls of his one-bedroom. "It was a happy time," Shashou, 77, recalled on a recent Sunday afternoon. "I was hoping to die here. " That was before Shashou received an eviction notice in March. Shashou's $825-a-month rent-controlled apartment, and 17 other units, will be demolished to make way for a pricey new apartment complex.
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NEWS
August 9, 1990
The district attorney's office has filed separate misdemeanor charges against two Covina property owners who allegedly cluttered their yards with vehicles, rubbish and animals. Gary Davis and Henry Cordova are scheduled to be arraigned Sept. 5 in Citrus Municipal Court in West Covina. Davis, owner of a single-family home in the 500 block of East Greenhaven Street, has been charged with four misdemeanor counts of failing to park inoperable cars and motorcycles in a garage or a paved area.
OPINION
February 26, 2014
Re "Arizona bill under fire from business," Feb. 23 What an amazing revelation: Four Roman Catholic bishops in Arizona are asking the faithful to support legislation that will give business owners the right to refuse service to customers who happen to be gay. Obviously these bishops did not read Pope Francis' "who am I to judge" memo. That, or perhaps they yearn for the days when business owners routinely refused to serve Americans of color as well as Catholics and Jews. In those days, property owners often included racial and religious covenants in their deeds to prevent their property from ever being sold to Americans of color or to Catholics or Jews.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2012 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court strengthened the rights of property owners who are confronted by federal environmental regulators, ruling Wednesday that they are entitled to a hearing to challenge the government's threats to fine them for building on their own land. The 9-0 decision is a victory for an Idaho couple who were portrayed by critics of the Environmental Protection Agency as victims of heavy-handed regulators. Michael and Chantell Sackett were told they faced fines of up $75,000 a day if they failed to restore their residential lot to its natural state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1998
Re "A Line in the Paint," June 29. As a supporter of both the arts and property rights, I would have to say that Tony Touma was 180 degrees wrong in obliterating M.B. Hanrahan's mural. After all, the owner of the building, Ray Ramirez, is of the opinion that "it really was beneficial." I admired Mr. Ramirez's courage when he owned the business, as well. Mr. Touma had the right to buy a business elsewhere that didn't have a mural on the building, but he chose to buy that business.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
As the MTA moves closer to starting construction on a subway tunnel in downtown Los Angeles, some property owners have dug in for a fight. The big landlords fear that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's plans to build a massive trench on Flower Street will disrupt their businesses for years, costing millions of dollars in lost revenue. The four-story-deep canyon planned by the MTA would travel through more than two busy city blocks of the financial district, which includes popular destinations such as the Westin Bonaventure Hotel, the Central Library and the City National Plaza office and retail complex.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Traditional Southern California supermarkets, already facing growing competition from leviathan discounters such as Wal-Mart and Target, are now catching blows on another flank as markets catering to environmentally conscious foodies proffer local fare in laid-back settings. Souped-up gourmet stores like Whole Foods Market long ago claimed a big share of the grocery business. But today it is smaller neighborhood stores, which aspire to offer customers top-drawer local fare, that are crowding in on the action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Reacting to the Bell city salary scandal, Los Angeles County supervisors said Tuesday that they were seeking state legislation to return $2.9 million in property tax overcharges to Bell property owners. Bell city officials illegally raised its property taxes in 2007, imposing a "retirement tax" to cover rising pension costs for its employees, state controller John Chiang found last week. But Chiang said Bell residents wouldn't be getting a tax refund because state law says such tax overpayments must instead go to schools in Bell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993
I disagree with the conclusions of your Nov. 7 editorial on Proposition 170, which would have lowered the vote needed to pass school bonds from a two-thirds majority to a simple majority. It was defeated in the Valley so badly because the tax money needed today for school bonds came from only one source, the property owner. Why? You will see this happen again and again when the attempt is made to tax only one group of citizens. I resent paying for education for people who never pay for education for their children.
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Is there a better symbol of Los Angeles' mismanagement than its miles and miles of sidewalks broken, buckled and twisted by tree roots? These concrete chasms and mini-mountains have made many of L.A.'s walkways nearly impassable for people in wheelchairs or those pushing strollers or those who are less sure-footed. Yet the mayor and City Council have consistently punted on long-term, politically difficult decisions required to address the problem, and their inaction costs taxpayers about $4 million a year to settle trip-and-fall lawsuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | Steve Lopez
If somehow you missed the news that California is drier than a stale tortilla, the Amber Alert signs have come to the rescue with highway bulletins like this one: "Serious drought, help save water. " This is helpful to a point, I suppose, and I like the creative use of highway signs heretofore reserved largely for safety warnings or child abductions. If Caltrans would consider pushing the boundaries even further, I'd spring for a sign that says: "Hey, Brian D'Arcy, where's our $40 million?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they will determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Doug Smith and Rosanna Xia
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they would determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Looking for new ways to fix buckled and broken sidewalks, Los Angeles City Councilman Bob Blumenfield called Tuesday for the reinstatement of a program that allows private property owners to pay a portion of the repair bill. Blumenfield , who represents part of the west San Fernando Valley, said he wants to make it possible for property owners to pay up to 75% of the cost of repairing their sidewalks. The effort would resemble a cost-sharing program that ended in 2009 amid a city financial crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
The University of California's release of data on nearly 1,500 older concrete buildings across Los Angeles marks a key step in the city's efforts to improve earthquake safety. Now the hard part begins. UC researchers spent several years compiling the list of buildings, a first-of-its-kind effort to help identify a type of building that earthquake experts have long said poses the greatest risk of death. Of all the older concrete buildings in Los Angeles, the researchers estimated that only about 75 would collapse during a huge quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO
A bit of taxpayer relief is in sight for 737,000 property owners across the city of Los Angeles. The city will credit $15.7 million in taxes that were overpaid toward the purchase of a Fire Department safety and paramedic communications system. On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved crediting the property owners on their upcoming tax bills. The tax dates back to November 1988, when voters approved a bond measure to finance $67 million in bonds to replace the system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles city building officials have concluded that it would take inspectors more than a year to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame that is vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake. City staffers developed a plan to winnow out these so-called soft story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau at the Department of Building and Safety, wrote in a report submitted to a City Council planning committee.
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