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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
As a beloved ex-President, Ronald Reagan almost always gets what he wants these days. But this week, one of Reagan's personal wishes was blocked by a federal convict with a typewriter. Last Friday, Reagan personally telephoned the National Park Service in Washington to add his support to proposed national historic landmark status for a mitten-shaped hill in the Santa Monica Mountains that includes prized Chumash Indian cave paintings. But on Monday, when the Park Service's advisory board met, it concluded that its hands were tied.
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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
As the camera pans through a marble room, a statue of a flute player, carved from the same beige marble, sways in time to his own music. As if fulfilling King Midas' dream, the flutist and the other statues in the room turn to gold, glittering in the light. Suddenly, a white ball appears and fills the screen with the familiar brush-stroke logo of The Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7).
NATIONAL
December 5, 2013 | David G. Savage
Veteran peace activist Dennis Apel says he was exercising his 1st Amendment rights when he was arrested after marking the start of the 2003 Iraq war by throwing some of his blood at a Vandenberg Air Force Base sign north of Santa Barbara. But after a second trespassing arrest at Vandenberg four years later, the military banned Apel from protesting in the area, including in a space across from the base's main gate along Highway 1, which had been specifically set aside for peaceful public protests.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS and FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even before AIDS-stricken rap star Eric (Eazy-E) Wright was laid to rest earlier this month, Wright's former lovers and business associates were haggling in Los Angeles Superior Court for control over his dwindling fortune. "It's sad and it's shocking," said the rapper's 26-year-old widow, Tomica Woods Wright, who has a year-old child by Wright and is pregnant with another, due in September. "A lot of people who claim to know (Wright) really didn't.
OPINION
September 12, 2012
Re "Court blocks property seizures," Sept. 6 The recent decision by a panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirming the property rights of the homeless has its roots in the seizure of four shopping carts provided by the group Catholic Worker. Since 1997, Catholic Worker has distributed more than 20,000 free shopping carts to the homeless. These are the property of Catholic Worker and cannot legally be taken by the police. These carts are pervasive around skid row, and they are the bane of the police and the business community.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2002
Due to my normal libertarian bent, Nicolai Ouroussoff and I would likely settle on agreeing to disagree regarding property owners' rights ("There Goes Our History," April 28). However, I'd like to extend a heartfelt thank-you to the city of Los Angeles for limiting to two the number of cultural heritage "police" that it employs. New York City is currently facing a massive budget deficit. I can only suggest that Mayor Bloomberg consider the 50-person staff of the Landmarks Commission as an excellent example of waste that can be cut. I would ask Ouroussoff to consider what any homeless shelter in New York could do with that bureaucracy's budget.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Mike and Chantell Sackett wanted to live on scenic Priest Lake in Idaho but couldn't afford it. So they bought a residential lot across the road that offered a distant view of the water, clearing the land and laying gravel. But instead of building their dream home, the Sacketts found themselves enmeshed in a four-year legal battle with the Environmental Protection Agency over whether their dry lot is a protected "wetlands" and possibly off-limits for building. Next week, the Supreme Court will take up the Sacketts' case, not to redefine wetlands but to decide whether landowners are entitled to a hearing before a judge when they are confronted by the EPA. The case is being closely watched by developers and environmentalists.
OPINION
February 22, 2012
City Atty. Carmen Trutanich is a man of his word. OK, perhaps not when it comes to his campaign promise to serve out his full term, but certainly when it involves the city's homeless policies. Last June, his office vowed to appeal a preliminary injunction by a federal court that temporarily barred the city's Bureau of Street Services and police from seizing or destroying the unattended property of homeless people in downtown's skid row neighborhood. This month, he followed through, asking the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn the injunction on the grounds that the city's homeless are in effect using the sidewalks as "their own public storage area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1987
From statements made by Neal R. Peirce ("Black Tuesday: "A Big Victory for Property Rights Over Public Rights," June 26) I think it's fair to conclude that he considers himself a liberal. Aren't property owners and developers just as entitled to their constitutional rights as everyone else? Why is it that U.S. Supreme Court decisions in favor of civil rights are applauded by liberals and decisions in favor of private property rights are scorned by the same people? Apparently Peirce doesn't like to consider private property owners as people with constitutional rights, thus making it easier to take away their rights in the so called best interest of the public.
WORLD
October 2, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SIDROLANDIA, Brazil - Early one morning in May, gunfire rang out in a rural encampment of the indigenous Terena tribe in southwestern Brazil, killing Oziel Gabriel, who had been carrying a bow and arrow. Though violent disputes over land between farm owners and tribesmen aren't uncommon in Brazil, this case has drawn attention because witnesses say Gabriel, a school janitor in his mid-30s, wasn't shot by pistoleiros - hired gunmen sent by farm owners to clear native Brazilians off the land - but by uniformed police officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Ronald Coase, a British-born University of Chicago economist whose Nobel Prize-winning work on the role of corporations stemmed from visits in the early 1930s to American companies including Ford Motor Co. and Union Carbide Corp., has died. He was 102. Coase, who had been the oldest living Nobel laureate, died Monday at St. Joseph Hospital in Chicago, the university announced. No cause was given. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science awarded Coase the 1991 Nobel in economics "for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property rights for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - In a decision bolstering private property rights, the Supreme Court ruled that a Florida landowner could sue a local government agency for denying him a building permit because he refused to pay for improvements on public property several miles away. The 5-4 decision expanded the ability of property owners to claim that government requirements attached to land-use permits amount to an improper "taking" under the Constitution. The 5th Amendment says private property can not be taken for public use without "just compensation.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Aaron Swartz was a wunderkind, a gifted boy who became a remarkable young man. He created a Wikipedia-like Web app and RSS software when he was a teenager. As a college student, he co-founded the website service Reddit. But like a figure in a fairy tale, despite his gifts, he was also evidently haunted: by severe depression, and lately by the prospect of a federal trial for a bakers' dozen of felony charges. Swartz was found dead over the weekend, hanged in his New York apartment, a suicide at age 26. The online world is aghast.
WORLD
October 18, 2012 | Daniel Hernandez and Cecilia Sanchez
Separated from the Yucatan Peninsula by a lagoon, this pristine island has streets of sand, iguanas that roam among humans, and a police presence best described as casual. In the tiny town on its western tip, golf carts are the primary mode of transportation. "It's like out of movie, isn't it?" said a chuckling Ramon Chan, a 41-year-old vendor who on a recent day was hacking away at fresh coconuts from a cart on the beach. In recent years, however, Isla Holbox (pronounced "holl-bosch")
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Robert Greene
The California Democratic Party opposes Proposition 31 , a measure on the Nov. 6 ballot to change the way budgeting is done at the state level while reframing the relationship between Sacramento and local governments. The California Republican Party supports it. No surprise. Democrats run California and have a vested interest in retaining the status quo. In the game of politics, they're winning here. They have mastered the rules. They will resist efforts to change them.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Aaron Swartz was a wunderkind, a gifted boy who became a remarkable young man. He created a Wikipedia-like Web app and RSS software when he was a teenager. As a college student, he co-founded the website service Reddit. But like a figure in a fairy tale, despite his gifts, he was also evidently haunted: by severe depression, and lately by the prospect of a federal trial for a bakers' dozen of felony charges. Swartz was found dead over the weekend, hanged in his New York apartment, a suicide at age 26. The online world is aghast.
OPINION
September 12, 2012
Re "Court blocks property seizures," Sept. 6 The recent decision by a panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirming the property rights of the homeless has its roots in the seizure of four shopping carts provided by the group Catholic Worker. Since 1997, Catholic Worker has distributed more than 20,000 free shopping carts to the homeless. These are the property of Catholic Worker and cannot legally be taken by the police. These carts are pervasive around skid row, and they are the bane of the police and the business community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
There was a time when the Pine Mountain Inn hosted the biggest party in town. Bikers would roar up the tortuous mountain roads north of Ojai, and cowboys would mosey by in their pickups. Hunters - sometimes more than 100 at a time - would camp in Tom Wolf's field and string fresh deer jerky on clotheslines. The menu boasted of "the purtiest waitresses, best food, lowest prices and only flush toilets within 14 miles in any direction. " There was no phone and only a generator for power.
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