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Proposition 143 Higher Education Facilities Bond

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NEWS
November 10, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voter rejection on Tuesday of a $450-million higher education construction bond measure means students will be squeezed into existing colleges and universities and planned new campuses probably will be delayed, officials of all three segments of California higher education said Friday. "This puts a dark cloud over a year of planning and leaves many necessary projects in jeopardy," said Ellis McCune, chancellor of the 20-campus California State University system.
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NEWS
November 10, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voter rejection on Tuesday of a $450-million higher education construction bond measure means students will be squeezed into existing colleges and universities and planned new campuses probably will be delayed, officials of all three segments of California higher education said Friday. "This puts a dark cloud over a year of planning and leaves many necessary projects in jeopardy," said Ellis McCune, chancellor of the 20-campus California State University system.
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SPORTS
November 6, 1990 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The fate of a $7.8-million project to expand Cal State Fullerton's Titan Gym doesn't hinge entirely on the outcome of Proposition 143 on today's ballot. But if the Higher Education Facilities Bond Act doesn't pass, it could set the project back a number of years. The 45,000-square-foot, two-story expansion to the south side of the gym has already been approved by the California State University Chancellor's office.
SPORTS
November 6, 1990 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The fate of a $7.8-million project to expand Cal State Fullerton's Titan Gym doesn't hinge entirely on the outcome of Proposition 143 on today's ballot. But if the Higher Education Facilities Bond Act doesn't pass, it could set the project back a number of years. The 45,000-square-foot, two-story expansion to the south side of the gym has already been approved by the California State University Chancellor's office.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY
Arguments over Proposition 143--an initiative that would provide $450 million for public colleges and universities--generally mirror the debate over using bonds to alleviate crowding in California's public schools. Officials of California's public colleges and universities fear that voters, tiring of repeated calls to support construction bond issues, may reject Proposition 143 on the Nov. 6 ballot. "We're worried about the trend line," said William B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995
As a retired teacher in the Los Angeles Community College District, I read with interest the large headline, "Former Students Tell Why Community College Failed Them" (Nov. 24). One of the complaints was of particular note: "turned off by a dilapidated campus." Remember Proposition 143, the Higher Education Facilities Bond Act on the Nov. 6, 1990, ballot? It would have provided funds to improve the facilities of California's public higher education institutions. I brought this election (as all others)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990
Californians face many important issues on Nov. 6, including the election of a new governor, possible tax increases and complex environmental legislation. Justifiably, much attention has been given to these issues in the media and other public forums. But voters should be aware of another issue on the ballot, one that is not likely to draw headlines but that is no less important to Californians and their future. Proposition 143, the Higher Education Facilities Bond Act, is the second of a two-part, $450-million general obligation bond.
SPORTS
November 13, 1990 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Cal State Fullerton basketball Coach John Sneed couldn't place too much stock in Friday night's Blue-Orange intrasquad scrimmage. With several players recovering from the flu and other minor injuries, the Titans weren't close to being in peak physical condition. And with only 13 players available for two teams, there wasn't much rest for the weary. Fatigue certainly contributed to Fullerton's 50 turnovers (29 for the Orange team, 21 for the Blue) and some sloppy play.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY
Arguments over Proposition 143--an initiative that would provide $450 million for public colleges and universities--generally mirror the debate over using bonds to alleviate crowding in California's public schools. Officials of California's public colleges and universities fear that voters, tiring of repeated calls to support construction bond issues, may reject Proposition 143 on the Nov. 6 ballot. "We're worried about the trend line," said William B.
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