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Proposition 187 Illegal Immigration

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NEWS
November 7, 1994 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dusty farmlands of the Sacramento Valley, a Republican state legislator is campaigning as hard against illegal immigrants as he is against his Democratic opponent. But in an ironic twist to an ugly race, freshman Sen. K. Maurice Johannessen of Redding finds his own legal status under fire from Democratic challenger Mike McGowan of West Sacramento. "I'm not the one who entered this country illegally, you are," McGowan, 47, charges in a television spot directed at Johannessen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2006 | George Skelton
It's an accepted truth -- at least it keeps getting reported -- that Proposition 187 was an unmitigated disaster for the Republican Party in California and a boon for Democrats. When Republican Gov. Pete Wilson aggressively pushed for the anti-illegal immigration initiative in 1994, it set back the GOP at least a generation. And it's conceivable the party will never recover. Or so they say.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California flag hangs upside-down in Glenn Spencer's hilltop home, the international SOS sign and the symbol, he says, of a state with its priorities topsy-turvy. Until now, that is. Spencer said last week's passage of Proposition 187 has given California a chance to survive--by barring illegal immigrants from most government services. Passage of the initiative also culminates two years of effort that began on the patio of his Sherman Oaks home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proponents of a new state initiative to deny illegal immigrants most public services--reviving the controversial Proposition 187--abandoned their effort this week, saying they couldn't gather enough signatures to place the measure on the November ballot. Supporters blamed the initiative's demise on the lack of support from California's Republican leaders, and the drawn-out legal battle that eventually smothered Proposition 187.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Republican Cabinet Secretary Jack F. Kemp faced an unenthusiastic and sometimes angry audience at the Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace on Wednesday as he defended his condemnation of Proposition 187, the illegal immigration reform measure on the Nov. 8 state ballot. In his first public discussion of his opposition to the initiative, Kemp told the audience that he could not, in good conscience, support a measure that would "turn teachers and nurses into agents of the INS."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN and PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Activists who unsuccessfully fought Proposition 187 at the ballot box unveiled formal boycott plans Thursday against two U.S. corporate icons--the purveyors of Mickey Mouse and Oreos--in an effort to capitalize on the economic clout of Latino consumers and others opposed to the immigration initiative. Boycott organizers, who are hoping to win support throughout the United States and Latin America, are targeting Walt Disney Co.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | RICH CONNELL and BETH SHUSTER and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As elected officials in Los Angeles and communities up and down the state launch legal challenges to Proposition 187, an angry groundswell of criticism has arisen over use of public funds to undo what the measure's backers see as a clear mandate from the voters.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa thanked President Ernesto Zedillo here Tuesday for helping defuse Proposition 187, saying the Mexican leader played a key role in scuttling the controversial state measure that denied benefits to illegal immigrants. "As leader of the state Assembly, I say President Zedillo had great impact in defeating Proposition 187," Villaraigosa told a news conference after he and a state delegation met the Mexican chief executive.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Gilbert Cedillo seems to be the last person who would budge in his opposition to Proposition 187. Before the Los Angeles Democrat became a legislator, he helped orchestrate a 1994 march that drew 150,000 protesters against the initiative to restrict education and health care for illegal immigrants. After voters approved Proposition 187, Cedillo joined a legal challenge that resulted in a federal judge ruling most of the measure unconstitutional.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading architect of California's Proposition 187, which called for the removal of illegal immigrants from public schools, told lawmakers Monday that he now opposes including similar restrictions in a national immigration bill now before Congress. Ronald S. Prince, a Tustin accountant who was co-chairman of the Proposition 187 campaign, telephoned Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and other congressional offices to explain that he had changed his mind on the public schooling issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proponents of a new state initiative to deny illegal immigrants most public services abandoned their effort this week, saying they couldn't gather enough signatures to place the measure on the November ballot. Supporters blamed the development on lack of backing from California's GOP leaders and the long legal battle that eventually smothered the first such effort, Proposition 187. That proposition, approved by nearly 60% of the voters in 1994, died in July after Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County grass-roots organization that launched the nation's most controversial attack on illegal immigration in 1994--polarizing California in the process--is pushing another statewide initiative in a bid to deny illegal immigrants most public services. Proposition 187, approved by 60% of California voters, barred the state from providing public services such as health care and education to illegal immigrants.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
The long court fight over Proposition 187, which sought to bar illegal immigrants from receiving public benefits and services, was ended Monday by the federal judge who first found most of the initiative unconstitutional in 1994. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer approved a July agreement between the state and civil rights groups to drop remaining challenges to her rulings that Proposition 187 violated the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Sponsors of Proposition 187 asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to allow enforcement of the voter-approved ban on education and public services for illegal immigrants because Gov. Gray Davis failed to defend it. Davis announced last week that he had settled a lawsuit by immigrant rights groups by agreeing to drop the state's appeal of a federal judge's ruling that declared most of Proposition 187 unconstitutional.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa thanked President Ernesto Zedillo here Tuesday for helping defuse Proposition 187, saying the Mexican leader played a key role in scuttling the controversial state measure that denied benefits to illegal immigrants. "As leader of the state Assembly, I say President Zedillo had great impact in defeating Proposition 187," Villaraigosa told a news conference after he and a state delegation met the Mexican chief executive.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days since Proposition 187 was laid to rest last week have passed in the slow, lazy rhythms of high summer with nothing moving much quicker than a trickle of condensation down a glass of iced tea. California, 1999, fat and happy in the glow of economic recovery, seems a far cry from the roiling, blood-boiling place that gave rise to Proposition 187 five years ago.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days since Proposition 187 was laid to rest last week have passed in the slow, lazy rhythms of high summer with nothing moving much quicker than a trickle of condensation down a glass of iced tea. California, 1999, fat and happy in the glow of economic recovery, seems a far cry from the roiling, blood-boiling place that gave rise to Proposition 187 five years ago.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after a federal judge issued a preliminary injunction barring implementation of key portions of Proposition 187, opponents statewide were mobilizing to get the word out that the hotly debated ballot measure on immigration is on hold indefinitely. From the San Fernando Valley to the governor's office, supporters of the proposition reacted with both anger and strategic acceptance.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | DAVE LESHER and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a federal court Thursday ratified Gov. Gray Davis' agreement ending official efforts to preserve Proposition 187, the governor faced the threat of a new legal challenge and the outrage of critics who said he has "set himself up as a monarch" by ignoring voters.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fix was in. The mediation process billed as a fight between the opponents of Proposition 187 and Gov. Gray Davis turned out to be a largely one-sided affair. The governor, stuck with the task of defending Proposition 187, had few choices in the negotiations that ended in an agreement Thursday, effectively killing the landmark 1994 ballot initiative, according to interviews with mediation participants and observers, as well as a review of documents and correspondence.
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