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Proposition 187 Illegal Immigration

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In politics, as in theater, there are dress rehearsals where the plot and the players are displayed before a small audience before moving to the larger arena. Take Proposition 187, now center stage from Eureka to San Ysidro. If California is Broadway for this political-social-cultural drama, then Encinitas was New Haven.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles City Council, with three members absent, delayed a vote Friday on whether to soften its decision to fight Proposition 187 in the courts, but the roiling ill will that has characterized council debate on the divisive initiative continued in full bloom. Councilman Joel Wachs, who wants the city to limit its role in the legal dispute over implementation of the initiative, said there were not enough members present to approve his motion.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Proposition 187 mandate that police question arrestees about their legal residence status would violate constitutional guarantees of privacy, according to a state advisory opinion released Tuesday, but provisions barring illegal immigrants from receiving social and health services generally conform with existing law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | AMY PYLE and SIMON ROMERO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The student walkouts that have disrupted schools in Los Angeles in recent weeks have their roots in a televised speech by Gov. Pete Wilson last spring that offended Angel Cervantes. Cervantes did not like the governor's tough stance against illegal immigrants, and now the 22-year-old graduate student from San Fernando finds himself a somewhat reluctant leader of efforts to channel youthful energy against Proposition 187, the Wilson-backed measure that would deny them public services.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | CATHLEEN DECKER and GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Campaigning the length of California, the four major candidates for U.S. Senate and governor readied their final pitches Sunday, the two Republicans appearing at an Orange County rally and all expressing a politician's confidence in their chances for election 48 hours hence. Gubernatorial candidates Kathleen Brown and Pete Wilson continued their angry back-and-forth about illegal immigration, Proposition 187 and crime, issues that have dominated their campaign in recent weeks.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
Gov. Pete Wilson is rested, relaxed and ready for Washington--not as a wanna-be President, but as a newly empowered Republican seeking help in implementing Proposition 187. Normally a workaholic, the governor celebrated his lopsided, come-from-behind reelection victory last weekend by just hanging around the house and going out to a movie ("Clear and Present Danger").
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California flag hangs upside-down in Glenn Spencer's hilltop home, the international SOS sign and the symbol, he says, of a state with its priorities topsy-turvy. Until now, that is. Spencer said last week's passage of Proposition 187 has given California a chance to survive--by barring illegal immigrants from most government services. Passage of the ballot initiative culminates two years of effort that began on the patio of his two-story home overlooking the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It wasn't an altruistic impulse that led Rocio Fregoso last month to the Santa Ana campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Brown. Fregoso was there to fulfill a high school government class assignment. She figured she would work for one day and then leave. But the Brown campaign needed volunteer workers, and the 17-year-old student wanted to earn extra credit for her class.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Election Day a week away, Los Angeles school administrators acknowledged Monday they are unable to keep students from leaving campus to protest Proposition 187 and can do little besides mark them truant. But parents say they consider the walkouts potentially dangerous and believe administrators should find ways to control students. "Parents are terrified about kids leaving campuses," said Harriet Sculley, president of the 31st District Parent Teacher Student Assn.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | MARK I. PINSKY and DEBBIE KONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Protests against Proposition 187 continued Friday throughout Orange County, ranging from student demonstrations in Tustin, Santa Ana, Anaheim and Costa Mesa to a hunger strike launched by more than a dozen doctors in Orange. The members of California Hispanic Medical Group in Orange said they plan to continue their liquid only fast until Election Day and predicted other physicians would join.
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