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Proposition 187 Illegal Immigration

NEWS
November 7, 1994 | CATHLEEN DECKER and GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Campaigning the length of California, the four major candidates for U.S. Senate and governor readied their final pitches Sunday, the two Republicans appearing at an Orange County rally and all expressing a politician's confidence in their chances for election 48 hours hence. Gubernatorial candidates Kathleen Brown and Pete Wilson continued their angry back-and-forth about illegal immigration, Proposition 187 and crime, issues that have dominated their campaign in recent weeks.
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NEWS
November 17, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
Gov. Pete Wilson is rested, relaxed and ready for Washington--not as a wanna-be President, but as a newly empowered Republican seeking help in implementing Proposition 187. Normally a workaholic, the governor celebrated his lopsided, come-from-behind reelection victory last weekend by just hanging around the house and going out to a movie ("Clear and Present Danger").
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California flag hangs upside-down in Glenn Spencer's hilltop home, the international SOS sign and the symbol, he says, of a state with its priorities topsy-turvy. Until now, that is. Spencer said last week's passage of Proposition 187 has given California a chance to survive--by barring illegal immigrants from most government services. Passage of the ballot initiative culminates two years of effort that began on the patio of his two-story home overlooking the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It wasn't an altruistic impulse that led Rocio Fregoso last month to the Santa Ana campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Brown. Fregoso was there to fulfill a high school government class assignment. She figured she would work for one day and then leave. But the Brown campaign needed volunteer workers, and the 17-year-old student wanted to earn extra credit for her class.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Election Day a week away, Los Angeles school administrators acknowledged Monday they are unable to keep students from leaving campus to protest Proposition 187 and can do little besides mark them truant. But parents say they consider the walkouts potentially dangerous and believe administrators should find ways to control students. "Parents are terrified about kids leaving campuses," said Harriet Sculley, president of the 31st District Parent Teacher Student Assn.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | MARK I. PINSKY and DEBBIE KONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Protests against Proposition 187 continued Friday throughout Orange County, ranging from student demonstrations in Tustin, Santa Ana, Anaheim and Costa Mesa to a hunger strike launched by more than a dozen doctors in Orange. The members of California Hispanic Medical Group in Orange said they plan to continue their liquid only fast until Election Day and predicted other physicians would join.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | MIMI KO
Should voters decide next week to pass Proposition 187, which would deny education and other public services to undocumented immigrants, opponents of the measure plan a demonstration Wednesday to urge educators, health-care providers and social workers to refuse to comply with its mandates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Debate on the best way to stem illegal immigration into California split along party lines Saturday at a gathering of most of the county's congressional candidates at Rancho Santiago College. Republicans backed Proposition 187 to end social services, education and all but emergency health care to illegal immigrants. Democrats favored military patrols of the U.S.-Mexico border and vigorous enforcement of employer sanctions. But Victor A. Wagner Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Proposition 187 would cost the Capistrano Unified School District as much as $12.5 million in new expenses and lost revenue if approved, according to a report prepared by the district. Trustees on Monday asked Supt. James A. Fleming to publicize the predicted impact that the controversial state ballot initiative would have on the school district of 33,000 students. The $12.5 million figure takes into consideration any savings the initiative would have on the district, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District officials predicted Friday that 10,000 teachers would lose their jobs and some campuses would be closed if Proposition 187 passes and is enforced. Board of Education President Mark Slavkin warned that all schools and students would be affected by the initiative and that the system stands to lose up to $628 million in federal funds. "This is very real for all students," Slavkin said. "Citizen children . . . will be hurt by a loss of funds.
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