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Proposition 215 Marijuana Decriminalization

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February 11, 2007 | Michael Goldstein, Michael Goldstein has written for the New York Daily News, Sunset and other publications. His 2004 Los Angeles Times Magazine story, "Sheer Lunacy," won a feature writing award from the Los Angeles Press Club.
Do you medicate? I do. I'm not talking about Xanax or Prozac or Vicodin or their siblings. I have a "recommendation" (not a prescription, a recommendation) for pot. This puts me in a legally and socially problematic condition. The state of California says I can ingest marijuana for medicinal purposes, but the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration thinks I'm a criminal if I do.
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MAGAZINE
February 11, 2007 | Michael Goldstein, Michael Goldstein has written for the New York Daily News, Sunset and other publications. His 2004 Los Angeles Times Magazine story, "Sheer Lunacy," won a feature writing award from the Los Angeles Press Club.
Do you medicate? I do. I'm not talking about Xanax or Prozac or Vicodin or their siblings. I have a "recommendation" (not a prescription, a recommendation) for pot. This puts me in a legally and socially problematic condition. The state of California says I can ingest marijuana for medicinal purposes, but the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration thinks I'm a criminal if I do.
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NEWS
November 2, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The human face of Proposition 215, the medical marijuana initiative on Tuesday's ballot, is benign and sympathetic. It's right there in the backers' TV commercials: A breast cancer survivor who uses marijuana to ease nausea, a doctor who prescribes it to ailing patients, the widow of a cancer patient who used marijuana. But opponents say those compassionate images mask the real force behind Proposition 215--a handful of wealthy out-of-state supporters unified by a mutual distaste for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The county Board of Supervisors filed a lawsuit in federal court Friday to overturn Proposition 215, the voter-approved measure that allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes in California. The supervisors, noting that federal law outlaws marijuana, have refused to issue medical marijuana identification cards as required by Proposition 215.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their most specific response yet to California's marijuana initiative, federal officials warned Thursday that under federal law a doctor's prescription does not excuse pilots, engineers or bus or truck drivers who test positive for drugs. "If you are entrusted with the safety of the traveling public and you test positive, these propositions don't mean a thing," said Transportation Secretary Federico Pena. "You will be removed." The initiative makes marijuana legal for medicinal purposes.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | DAVID FERRELL and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call him one of the, ah, grass-roots campaigners. He sings and tells jokes for pocket change. His sign--"World's Greatest Wino"--features a bumper sticker supporting Proposition 215, in no small part because Clarence Bobby Brown has been treating himself with pot for some time now. "I'm nearly blind," Brown, 59, said Wednesday on the Venice boardwalk, proudly sporting an "I voted" sticker. "Therapeutic purposes is what I use marijuana for. When I want to get high, this is what I use."
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal appeals court created a potentially major opening in federal drug laws Monday, ruling that medical marijuana centers may be allowed to distribute cannabis if they can prove that the drug is needed to protect patients against imminent medical harm. In its decision, the three-judge panel of the 9th U.S.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
The City Council says that medical pot users may keep 1 1/2 pounds of marijuana on hand, defying a limit set by state Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren. The policy, approved unanimously Tuesday, is believed to be the state's most liberal and permissive since implementation of Proposition 215, the medical marijuana initiative approved in 1996. Lungren has set a limit of two plants, or 1 ounce of marijuana, for a 30-day supply.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than two dozen sheriff's deputies swooped down on San Francisco's largest medical marijuana club and closed it during a predawn raid Monday. Four days after San Francisco Superior Court Judge William Cahill declared the club a public nuisance, a locksmith let a busload of deputies in through a back door of the Cannabis Healing Center at 6 a.m. They evicted seven people staying there, changed the locks and took inventory of the building's contents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man at the lectern said his message would be brief. And as the five Orange County supervisors leaned back in their chairs, Steve Kubby, articulate and well-dressed in a business suit, came right to the point. "Hi, I'm Steve Kubby. I'm a cancer patient and I use marijuana to stay alive." Kubby urged the board to enforce the state's medical-marijuana initiative and also to provide "safe houses" where the seriously ill can use the drug without fear of arrest or harassment by law enforcement.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Pot politics have invaded upscale Marin County, with the top prosecutor facing recall amid claims she's trampling on California's new medical marijuana law. The May 22 election forced on Marin County Dist. Atty. Paula Kamena is the latest salvo in the war over pharmaceutical pot and one that may be repeated; organizers have a list of five other county prosecutors they would like to turn out of office. "This could be the start of something," says Chuck Thomas, spokesman for the Washington D.C.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even for the trend-setting California ballot, this was a bold proposition--to take marijuana, a long-demonized drug, and make it medicine. Supporters said Proposition 215 would ease the ills of thousands. Foes predicted chaos for cops, big problems for prosecutors. Both sides, in the end, were right.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between the red brick walls of a cramped courtroom here, a long-running show trial of sorts over the medical use of pot is near its climax. The defendant is a 1998 Libertarian Party gubernatorial candidate and early backer of Proposition 215, the landmark 1996 medical marijuana measure. The case features big-name defense attorneys, accusations of a political witch hunt and countercharges of Rambo-style defense tactics.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Supreme Court on Tuesday barred Californians from legally giving marijuana to people who are sick and in pain. The emergency order halts, at least for now, a San Francisco judge's decree handed down last month that cleared the way for distributing cannabis to those for whom it is a "medical necessity."
NEWS
July 15, 2000 | Associated Press
With $25 and a doctor's note, a sick person can get an official city ID card permitting use of medicinal marijuana, San Francisco's maverick district attorney proudly announced Friday. "This represents another stone in the foundation we're building to make people recognize that cannabis is a legitimate medicinal agent," Terence Hallinan said. "I'm not really worried we won't be able to work things out with the federal government."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man at the lectern said his message would be brief. And as the five Orange County supervisors leaned back in their chairs, Steve Kubby, articulate and well-dressed in a business suit, came right to the point. "Hi, I'm Steve Kubby. I'm a cancer patient and I use marijuana to stay alive." Kubby urged the board to enforce the state's medical-marijuana initiative and also to provide "safe houses" where the seriously ill can use the drug without fear of arrest or harassment by law enforcement.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of doctors and patients filed a lawsuit Tuesday to block the federal government from punishing physicians who recommend marijuana for sick people in their care. The suit, filed in federal court in San Francisco, is a response to Clinton Administration plans to fight implementation of California's medical marijuana initiative, approved by voters in November.
NEWS
May 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
A judge on Monday denied a motion to dismiss charges against Cannabis Buyers' Club founder Dennis Peron. Defense attorneys had argued that the case was politically motivated. They also said it became moot when voters approved Proposition 215, the initiative that permits the medicinal use of marijuana. But Alameda County Superior Court Judge Larry Goodman rejected those arguments and said defendants had failed to prove that the state attorney general's office is selectively prosecuting them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of the state law allowing the use of marijuana for medical purposes are urging Orange County supervisors to follow their "constitutional duty" and uphold the 3-year-old voter-approved initiative. "Now is the time for our elected officials to show good faith and uphold the law," Steve Kubby of Laguna Beach told supervisors at last week's board meeting. Kubby and other residents appeared before the board for the second time in two weeks.
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