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Proposition 56 Budget Accountability Act

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2004 | Evan Halper and Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writers
At a Fresno town hall discussion of the $15-billion state deficit-reduction bond that will appear on the March ballot, Controller Steve Westly announced that he and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger stood together in supporting "the budget accountability initiative." Whoops. The controller didn't mean to say that. The Budget Accountability Act is a different ballot measure that would make it easier for lawmakers to raise taxes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2004 | George Skelton
California is a backwater in the presidential primaries. And the Republican Senate race seems a runaway. So the hottest items on Tuesday's statewide ballot are three proposition questions. I say three because two ballot propositions -- 57 and 58 -- are really one question: Do we trust Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and his budget borrowing-and-balancing scheme? Or tell him to look at other options? Another question is whether to make it easier for the Legislature to pass budgets and tax increases.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered a political consultant on Thursday to try to stop the Postal Service from sending out 1.6 million illegal campaign mailers opposing Proposition 56, a measure that would make it easier for state lawmakers to pass budgets and raise taxes. Judge David P. Yaffee ruled that the mailers violated the Political Reform Act because they failed to disclose that the "No on 56" campaign had paid to put its message on them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Proposition 56 is pitched by supporters as an antidote to years of state budget gridlock that has wreaked havoc on the finances of local governments, schools and social service programs caught in the cross-fire. But, opponents say, making it easier for lawmakers to reach consensus on a spending plan means making it easier for them to raise taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
As next week's election approaches, supporters of Proposition 56 are seeking to stop distribution of mailers they call deceptive. The mailers, published by Larry Levine and Associates, urge voters to cast ballots for other propositions but not 56. The measure would make it easier for the Legislature to approve a budget and new taxes. Proposition 56 supporters say the mailers do not disclose that Levine received payments from opponents of the initiative, and want a court order to stop it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2004 | George Skelton
California is a backwater in the presidential primaries. And the Republican Senate race seems a runaway. So the hottest items on Tuesday's statewide ballot are three proposition questions. I say three because two ballot propositions -- 57 and 58 -- are really one question: Do we trust Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and his budget borrowing-and-balancing scheme? Or tell him to look at other options? Another question is whether to make it easier for the Legislature to pass budgets and tax increases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2004
The political committee Californians Against Higher Taxes has begun a television advertising campaign opposing Proposition 56. That March 2 ballot measure, called the Budget Accountability Act, would make it easier for the Legislature to pass the state budget and other financial measures by lowering the threshold of votes needed from two-thirds of both houses to a 55% majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2004 | George Skelton
OK, the most important item for Californians on the March 2 ballot is: Not Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's $15-billion Sacramento bailout bond, Prop. 57. Nor his budget-balancing requirement, Prop. 58. They're only the most ballyhooed and the most important to Schwarzenegger politically. If that bond fails, there's a smaller backup available with a shorter payback at less interest. Not the $12.3-billion school bond. That could be resubmitted to voters in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | Dan Morain and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
Public employee unions are spending millions to promote a ballot measure that would make it easier for state lawmakers to raise taxes, while tobacco interests, alcohol companies and other potential tax targets are waging a multimillion-dollar campaign against it. The fight is over Proposition 56, an initiative on the March 2 ballot that would lower the Legislature's threshold for approving the annual state budget and any tax increases to 55%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2004
The political committee Californians for Budget Accountability -- Yes on 56 has added a new spot to its TV advertising campaign in support of Proposition 56. The March 2 ballot measure, called the Budget Accountability Act, would make it easier for the state Legislature to pass a budget and other financial measures by lowering the threshold of legislative votes needed from two-thirds of both houses to a 55% majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered a political consultant on Thursday to try to stop the Postal Service from sending out 1.6 million illegal campaign mailers opposing Proposition 56, a measure that would make it easier for state lawmakers to pass budgets and raise taxes. Judge David P. Yaffee ruled that the mailers violated the Political Reform Act because they failed to disclose that the "No on 56" campaign had paid to put its message on them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
As next week's election approaches, supporters of Proposition 56 are seeking to stop distribution of mailers they call deceptive. The mailers, published by Larry Levine and Associates, urge voters to cast ballots for other propositions but not 56. The measure would make it easier for the Legislature to approve a budget and new taxes. Proposition 56 supporters say the mailers do not disclose that Levine received payments from opponents of the initiative, and want a court order to stop it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
One group promises Proposition 56 would bring an end to the delay tactics and partisan games that freeze the Legislature in budget gridlock year after year. Another warns it would be a disaster, greasing the way for all kinds of tax hikes, resulting in a mass migration of businesses from the state. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2004
The political committee Californians for Budget Accountability -- Yes on 56 has added a new spot to its TV advertising campaign in support of Proposition 56. The March 2 ballot measure, called the Budget Accountability Act, would make it easier for the state Legislature to pass a budget and other financial measures by lowering the threshold of legislative votes needed from two-thirds of both houses to a 55% majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | Dan Morain and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
Public employee unions are spending millions to promote a ballot measure that would make it easier for state lawmakers to raise taxes, while tobacco interests, alcohol companies and other potential tax targets are waging a multimillion-dollar campaign against it. The fight is over Proposition 56, an initiative on the March 2 ballot that would lower the Legislature's threshold for approving the annual state budget and any tax increases to 55%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2004 | Evan Halper and Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writers
At a Fresno town hall discussion of the $15-billion state deficit-reduction bond that will appear on the March ballot, Controller Steve Westly announced that he and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger stood together in supporting "the budget accountability initiative." Whoops. The controller didn't mean to say that. The Budget Accountability Act is a different ballot measure that would make it easier for lawmakers to raise taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Proposition 56 is pitched by supporters as an antidote to years of state budget gridlock that has wreaked havoc on the finances of local governments, schools and social service programs caught in the cross-fire. But, opponents say, making it easier for lawmakers to reach consensus on a spending plan means making it easier for them to raise taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
One group promises Proposition 56 would bring an end to the delay tactics and partisan games that freeze the Legislature in budget gridlock year after year. Another warns it would be a disaster, greasing the way for all kinds of tax hikes, resulting in a mass migration of businesses from the state. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2004 | George Skelton
OK, the most important item for Californians on the March 2 ballot is: Not Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's $15-billion Sacramento bailout bond, Prop. 57. Nor his budget-balancing requirement, Prop. 58. They're only the most ballyhooed and the most important to Schwarzenegger politically. If that bond fails, there's a smaller backup available with a shorter payback at less interest. Not the $12.3-billion school bond. That could be resubmitted to voters in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2004
The political committee Californians Against Higher Taxes has begun a television advertising campaign opposing Proposition 56. That March 2 ballot measure, called the Budget Accountability Act, would make it easier for the Legislature to pass the state budget and other financial measures by lowering the threshold of votes needed from two-thirds of both houses to a 55% majority.
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