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Proposition 66 Sentencing Reform

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NEWS
October 24, 2004
Summary: The measure would change the state's three-strikes law, which provides sentences of 25 years to life for a person convicted of a third felony, regardless of its seriousness, if the person has two convictions for serious or violent felonies. Under Proposition 66, the third strike also would have to be a serious or violent felony. The proposition would redefine which crimes are considered strikes and would increase punishment for certain sex crimes against children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 24, 2004
Summary: The measure would change the state's three-strikes law, which provides sentences of 25 years to life for a person convicted of a third felony, regardless of its seriousness, if the person has two convictions for serious or violent felonies. Under Proposition 66, the third strike also would have to be a serious or violent felony. The proposition would redefine which crimes are considered strikes and would increase punishment for certain sex crimes against children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
In an echo of a political battle he won 10 years ago, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bill Jones traveled here Wednesday to defend the three-strikes measure he wrote as a member of the California Assembly -- a law that would be partially rewritten under a November ballot initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
In an echo of a political battle he won 10 years ago, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bill Jones traveled here Wednesday to defend the three-strikes measure he wrote as a member of the California Assembly -- a law that would be partially rewritten under a November ballot initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2004 | Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writer
Half a dozen tombstone-shaped placards stood on easels at the front of a South Los Angeles meeting hall this month, each bearing the photo of a convict incarcerated under the state's 1994 three-strikes law. Filling the row of folding chairs and standing in the aisles were community activists, relatives of convicted felons and a few repeat offenders who had served their time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2004 | Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writer
Half a dozen tombstone-shaped placards stood on easels at the front of a South Los Angeles meeting hall this month, each bearing the photo of a convict incarcerated under the state's 1994 three-strikes law. Filling the row of folding chairs and standing in the aisles were community activists, relatives of convicted felons and a few repeat offenders who had served their time.
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