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Proposition 71 Stem Cell Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2004 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Half of the $19 million raised by backers of Proposition 71, the stem cell research initiative, has come from venture capitalists who invest in promising young companies. The number and size of the donations have prompted opponents to accuse the investors of lining up to profit from an initiative that would send $3 billion in taxpayer money to scientists in search of medical breakthroughs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2007 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court gave final clearance Wednesday to California's landmark $3-billion stem cell research effort, declining to hear an appeal of two lower court rulings upholding the constitutionality of 2004's Proposition 71. "This is the end of the road," said Dana Cody, executive director of the Life Legal Defense Foundation, which represents two of the taxpayer and religious groups that sued.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik, Golden State appears every Monday and Thursday. You can reach Michael Hiltzik at golden.state@latimes.com.
The California Council on Science and Technology, a group of highly experienced and well-informed professionals, has discovered a painful fact of life: Nobody likes a spoilsport. Last week, the council issued a report explaining why the state shouldn't count on a quick shower of wealth from the $6-billion Proposition 71 investment in embryonic stem cell research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2007 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Stanford University will build a center for stem cell research in the heart of its campus with the help of a $33-million gift announced Tuesday. The donation from Lorry I. Lokey, the founder of Business Wire and a 1949 Stanford graduate, came a day after a California appeals court upheld the constitutionality of Proposition 71, a $3-billion bond measure for stem cell research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2004 | Joe Mathews and Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger endorsed a $3-billion measure Monday to fund embryonic stem cell research, a move that could be pivotal in one of the year's most closely watched initiative campaigns. The decision was one of two that put the Republican governor at odds with his party, statewide and nationally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A trial that could determine the fate of the state's $3-billion stem cell research initiative concluded Thursday in Alameda County Superior Court, but the judge will not issue a ruling until later this month at the earliest. Opponents contend that the institute, which voters created in November 2004, is unconstitutional because it operates without direct state control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
California's $3-billion foray into stem cell research, approved by voters more than a year ago, will not begin in earnest for perhaps 15 more months because of legal challenges to the initiative, officials said Friday. "It will be the spring of 2007 before we will be able to pursue stem cell research on the scale that the voters of Prop. 71 expect," Zach Hall, president of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, told his board of directors Friday.
NEWS
October 24, 2004
Summary: The measure would provide for the sale of $3 billion in bonds to pay for embryonic stem cell research in California. It would allow about $300 million in grants in each of the next 10 years. With interest payments, the bonds would cost about $6 billion over 30 years. Many scientists believe that embryonic stem cells have great potential for the study and treatment of conditions such as juvenile diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and spinal cord injuries.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
The Now-They-Tell-Us Department, best known for the nonexistent WMDs in Iraq, has a surprise for California voters who approved the $3-billion embryonic stem cell research bond in the last election: Don't expect state officials to have much oversight of how the money gets spent. This realization emerges from a spat that has erupted between two supporters of the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2004 | Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writer
With the passage of a $3-billion stem cell bond measure, California moves into uncharted territory, becoming the first state to create a massive program to fund a single field of scientific research. The approval of billions in new state spending -- a tough sell even when the state is not deeply in debt -- was a sign of Californians' deeply rooted optimism about science, said Jack Pitney, a professor of government at Claremont McKenna College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Court of Appeal in San Francisco heard oral arguments Wednesday in the 2-year-old dispute that has kept the state's voter-created stem cell institute from issuing any of the $3 billion in bonds approved under Proposition 71, the 2004 stem cell research initiative. The plaintiffs in the two consolidated lawsuits are appealing a decision by the Alameda County Superior Court last April that upheld the constitutionality of the institute and its citizen oversight committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2006 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
The scientist credited with making California's voter-created stem cell institute a reality and recasting its often-hyped promises into realistic goals announced his retirement Wednesday as its first president. Neuroscientist Zach W. Hall was named interim president of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine in March 2005, four months after voters passed Proposition 71, authorizing $3 billion in bonds to fund stem cell research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2006 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
The meeting was almost over when Roman Reed steered his wheelchair to the microphone. On the table before him sat a 149-page book of budget charts and timetables, the first concrete outline of what California's voter-approved stem cell institute plans to accomplish in its 10-year lifespan. "I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart," Reed said to the institute's staff and 29-member oversight board in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
The state attorney general asked a California appellate court Wednesday to expedite lawsuits that have paralyzed the voter-approved $3-billion stem cell research initiative, after plaintiffs confirmed that they will appeal. Proposition 71, passed in November 2004, aimed to circumvent federal restrictions on embryonic stem cell research and channel more money into the science than any other U.S. effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Legal challenges to the state's $3-billion stem cell initiative were rejected Friday by an Alameda County Superior Court judge in a strongly worded ruling. The lawsuits by taxpayer and religious groups have blocked the state's ability to issue the bonds that will allow it to hand out an estimated $300 million a year over a decade for stem cell research. Challengers vowed to appeal to the California Supreme Court -- a move certain to extend the legal battle until at least next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A trial that could determine the fate of the state's $3-billion stem cell research initiative concluded Thursday in Alameda County Superior Court, but the judge will not issue a ruling until later this month at the earliest. Opponents contend that the institute, which voters created in November 2004, is unconstitutional because it operates without direct state control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2004 | George Skelton
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has not taken a position on arguably the most unique, intriguing measure on the Nov. 2 state ballot. That's Proposition 71: a $3-billion bond issue for embryonic stem cell research. But he did recently make a compelling argument for the initiative without mentioning it. "Our state is busy writing the next chapter of its economic success story," Schwarzenegger told his Council of Economic Advisors. "We are already the world's undisputed leader in biotechnology.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
President Bush may have unwittingly done the stem cell research community a big favor in 2001 when he outlawed federal funding for all but a very limited category of work in the field. For all that scientists bemoan Bush's ideologically inspired hobbling of a highly promising biomedical discipline, stem cell research has since acquired a gratifyingly high profile. Nancy Reagan and Ron Reagan Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of the $3-billion stem cell research initiative approved by California voters characterized it Monday as fraught with conflicts of interest and so unaccountable to the state and taxpayers that it is unconstitutional. A deputy attorney general countered that the legal challenges that have held up public spending by the state stem cell institute are "tortured interpretations of the constitution."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
California's $3-billion foray into stem cell research, approved by voters more than a year ago, will not begin in earnest for perhaps 15 more months because of legal challenges to the initiative, officials said Friday. "It will be the spring of 2007 before we will be able to pursue stem cell research on the scale that the voters of Prop. 71 expect," Zach Hall, president of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, told his board of directors Friday.
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