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Proposition 78 Pharmaceutical Industry Drug Discounts

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
The nation's drug makers have given hundreds of thousands of dollars to political leaders and civil rights groups that have endorsed the industry's initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot. The measure, Proposition 78, would avert state caps on the price of prescription drugs. Those embracing it while taking the industry's money include the conservative Traditional Values Coalition, an emergency-room physician in Los Angeles, the California arm of the NAACP and the Mexican American Political Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2005 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
A drug industry-supported campaign, which has been criticized for giving money to people who endorsed its ballot measure, is now under fire for misrepresenting the positions of black politicians. A mailer paid for by the campaign and headlined "The Black Woman's Guide to California Politics" urges voters to support Proposition 78. The measure would allow drug companies to voluntarily cap prices and avert mandatory caps.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
The nation's drug makers, shattering spending records on California initiative campaigns, have poured $76.5 million into television ads, mail and other activities to persuade voters to embrace their cause on the Nov. 8 ballot, reports filed with the state Thursday show. The pharmaceutical industry's spending exceeds the $65 million that Indian tribes spent in 1998 in an effort to legalize gambling on their reservations. And it approaches the $84.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
The nation's drug makers have given hundreds of thousands of dollars to political leaders and civil rights groups that have endorsed the industry's initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot. The measure, Proposition 78, would avert state caps on the price of prescription drugs. Those embracing it while taking the industry's money include the conservative Traditional Values Coalition, an emergency-room physician in Los Angeles, the California arm of the NAACP and the Mexican American Political Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2005 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
California voters narrowly favor an initiative on Tuesday's ballot to bar abortions for minors unless parents are notified, but are leaning against two prescription-drug discount measures, according to a new Los Angeles Times poll. Likely voters also tilt strongly against Proposition 80, which would impose new rules on the electric power industry, the survey found. The abortion, drug and electricity measures have been eclipsed for months by initiatives sponsored by Gov.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
The pharmaceutical industry's campaign to turn California's voter initiative process into its wholly owned subsidiary is moving into full gear. With the statewide appearance of two television ads financed by a war chest pegged at $60 million (and counting) and aimed at two ballot initiatives concerned with prescription drug prices, it's timely to consider what we're getting for the drug companies' money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2005 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
A drug industry-supported campaign, which has been criticized for giving money to people who endorsed its ballot measure, is now under fire for misrepresenting the positions of black politicians. A mailer paid for by the campaign and headlined "The Black Woman's Guide to California Politics" urges voters to support Proposition 78. The measure would allow drug companies to voluntarily cap prices and avert mandatory caps.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Propositions 78 and 79 both would create drug discount programs for low-income Californians, but they differ in scope and enforcement clout. If both pass, the one with the larger number of votes will take effect. Proposition 78 would create a program open to individuals who do not have insurance coverage for prescriptions and who make no more than $29,000 a year. Families of four that make no more than $58,000 would be eligible, according to the legislative analyst's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2005 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
California voters narrowly favor an initiative on Tuesday's ballot to bar abortions for minors unless parents are notified, but are leaning against two prescription-drug discount measures, according to a new Los Angeles Times poll. Likely voters also tilt strongly against Proposition 80, which would impose new rules on the electric power industry, the survey found. The abortion, drug and electricity measures have been eclipsed for months by initiatives sponsored by Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
The nation's drug makers, shattering spending records on California initiative campaigns, have poured $76.5 million into television ads, mail and other activities to persuade voters to embrace their cause on the Nov. 8 ballot, reports filed with the state Thursday show. The pharmaceutical industry's spending exceeds the $65 million that Indian tribes spent in 1998 in an effort to legalize gambling on their reservations. And it approaches the $84.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Propositions 78 and 79 both would create drug discount programs for low-income Californians, but they differ in scope and enforcement clout. If both pass, the one with the larger number of votes will take effect. Proposition 78 would create a program open to individuals who do not have insurance coverage for prescriptions and who make no more than $29,000 a year. Families of four that make no more than $58,000 would be eligible, according to the legislative analyst's office.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
The pharmaceutical industry's campaign to turn California's voter initiative process into its wholly owned subsidiary is moving into full gear. With the statewide appearance of two television ads financed by a war chest pegged at $60 million (and counting) and aimed at two ballot initiatives concerned with prescription drug prices, it's timely to consider what we're getting for the drug companies' money.
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